Posts Tagged ‘Misdiagnosis’

More About the ADHD Hoax

Monday, October 10th, 2022

In 1987, “Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder” (ADHD) was literally voted into existence by a show of hands of American Psychiatric Association members and included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). Within a year, 500,000 children in America alone were diagnosed with this fraudulent “disease”.

Sarah Durston, Professor of Developmental Disorders of the Brain at the University Medical Center Utrecht in Utrecht, Netherlands, spent 13 years (between 2003-2018) and over 2.5 million euros searching for the source of ADHD in the brain, and did not find it.

She concluded in a 2021 article about ADHD in Scientific American that, “Calling the condition a disorder falsely implies we know of a cause located in the brains of people diagnosed with it—and we don’t.” She says, “The most common psychiatric handbooks (DSM-5 and ICD-11) are clear on the status of their classifications: they are purely descriptive and are not based on underlying causes” and that “ADHD does not cause attention problems any more than low socioeconomic status causes poverty.”

Trying in vain to find a biological cause is not unique to ADHD; this deficiency exists for virtually all 541 disorders in DSM-5. The DSM says, “in the absence of clear biological markers or clinically useful measurements of severity for many mental disorders it has not been possible to completely separate normal and pathological.”

Moreover, the symptoms used to “diagnose” ADHD are typical of the side effects of central nervous system stimulants (such as methylphenidate [e.g. Ritalin, Concerta]) used to “treat” ADHD. This confusion is not so surprising because much ADHD research is done on children who are already taking stimulants.

All stimulants work by increasing levels of the neurotransmitter dopamine in the brain. The body must strictly regulate dopamine levels since both an excess and a deficiency can be very problematic. Thus drugs which mess with dopamine play Russian Roulette with your brain.

Methylphenidate is often referred to as “amphetamine-like” or “cocaine-like.” It has hallucinogenic properties as well as being a stimulant. It binds to the same sites in the brain as cocaine, thus producing effects that are indistinguishable from cocaine; in fact, it is more potent than cocaine. For this reason it is also called “kiddie cocaine.”

Why do people who take amphetamine-like drugs such as methylphenidate say that their attention and concentration improves? One explanation is that this drug can cause psychosis, and compulsive-psychotic behavior may make the person less likely to be distracted by external stimuli. This is called “tunnel-focus”, and prompts the additional moniker of “chemical straightjacket.” Long-term use increases the likelihood of addiction and psychosis.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has this to say about methylphenidate: “There is neither specific evidence which clearly establishes the mechanism whereby Ritalin produces its mental and behavioral effects in children, nor conclusive evidence regarding how these effects relate to the condition of the central nervous system;” and “Treatment emergent psychotic or manic symptoms, e. g., hallucinations, delusional thinking, or mania in children and adolescents without a prior history of psychotic illness or mania can be caused by stimulants at usual doses.”

Furthermore, there is no evidence that stimulants result in any long-term improvement in either behavior or academic achievement.

The ADHD diagnosis does not identify a genuine biological or psychological disorder. The diagnosis is simply a list of behaviors that may appear unwanted, disruptive or inappropriate.

Meanwhile, a former nurse practitioner who ran psychiatric clinics in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, admitted October 4, 2022 to writing illegal Adderall prescriptions while suspended for other drug charges. He continued to prescribe Adderall despite his suspension and submitted claims to Medicare for office visits under a co-worker’s license. Adderall is another habit-forming stimulant amphetamine drug prescribed for ADHD.

Any medical doctor who takes the time to conduct a thorough physical examination of a child or adult exhibiting signs of what a psychiatrist calls ADHD can find undiagnosed, untreated physical conditions. Any person labeled with so-called ADHD needs to receive a thorough physical examination by a competent medical—not psychiatric—doctor to first determine what underlying physical condition is causing the manifestation.

No one denies that people can have difficult problems in their lives, that at times they can be mentally unstable, subject to unreasonable depression, inattention, anxiety or panic. Mental health care is therefore both valid and necessary. However, the emphasis must be on workable mental healing methods that improve and strengthen individuals and thereby society by restoring people to personal strength, ability, competence, confidence, stability, responsibility and spiritual well-being. Psychiatric diagnosis, drugs and other psychiatric treatments are not workable.

Reference
The Hidden Horrors of Psychiatry by C.F. van der Horst (Per Veritatem Vis Foundation, 2022)

The Hidden Horrors of Psychiatry

Monday, September 19th, 2022

Book Review
The Hidden Horrors of Psychiatry
Infiltrating the school system, businesses and your home
C.F. van der Horst
© 2022 Per Veritatem Vis Foundation
All rights reserved.
http://www.psychhorrors.com/
https://www.amazon.com/Hidden-Horrors-Psychiatry-Infiltrating-Businesses/dp/9082177250/

The Hidden Horrors of Psychiatry addresses several significant and shocking issues related to psychiatry that have been rarely exposed or are altogether unknown. 

Everyone involved with mental health care—and especially caregivers such as physicians, psychologists, nurses, social workers, as well as psychiatrists themselves—should be well aware of these issues. And, because of their far-reaching impact, public representatives, legislators, judges, forensic doctors, lawyers, members of police forces, and employers should also be familiar with this data. 

With a chapter dedicated to the current education crisis and increasing illiteracy rates, this book is indispensable for remedial educators, teachers and parents.

Although The Hidden Horrors of Psychiatry focuses on ADHD and shows how arbitrary diagnoses are used to medicalize child behavior, it goes far beyond ADHD. Indeed, it pertains to any mental health issue. The general pattern of medicalizing, diagnosing, and drugging or otherwise treating is very similar to the treatment of ADHD.

The well-documented and sometimes horrifying data presented in this book shed new light on medicine and psychiatry, their alliance with the pharmaceutical industry, and the scientific underpinnings of psychiatric diagnoses and potentially very dangerous psychiatric treatments.

These facts show that the hidden horrors of psychiatry can affect you too, professionally or privately, and perhaps sooner than you might think.

The Hidden Horrors of Psychiatry

Obedience Pills: ADHD and the Medicalization of Childhood

Monday, July 25th, 2022

[Book Review by Jim Gottstein of PsychRights]

“I just finished Obedience Pills by Patrick Hahn, the latest book to be published by Samizdat Health Writer’s Co-operative.  It is a very comprehensive, very readable, account of the invention of ADHD and the total lack of any scientific support for the drugs given to suppress childish behavior by children.  And, how the diagnosis and drugs absolve parents and the other adults in their children’s lives from responsibility for raising them, as well as teaching the diagnosed they are not responsible for their behavior.  There is much more and Obedience Pills has a lot of commonsense as well as being meticulously supported.

“There are a lot of books critical of the ADHD diagnosis and ADHD drugs and I can’t say I have read that many of them, but I would put Obedience Pills on the top of the list.   I recommended Hahn’s Prescription for Sorrow about so-called antidepressants a year and a half ago and after reading Obedience Pills I plan to take out a loan to purchase his Madness and Genetic Determinism.  I am hoping it will make the genetics understandable.”

[Patrick D. Hahn is a free-lance writer and independent scholar with a long-standing interest in iatrogenic harm and the medicalization of everyday life.]

Read more about ADHD here: https://www.cchrstl.org/adhd.shtml

ADHD newborn

Titration Titillation

Monday, January 10th, 2022

Titration is the process of adjusting the dose of a drug for the maximum benefit that can be obtained without any adverse effects. When a drug’s recommended dosage has a narrow therapeutic range, titration is especially important, because the range between the dose at which a drug is effective and the dose at which side effects occur is small. The starting dose is very low, and then increased regularly until the symptoms subside, or the recommended maximum dose is achieved, or side effects occur.

[Titrate ultimately derived from Latin titulus, “inscription, label, title”.]

When changing to a different medication, sometimes one can be stopped and the other then started without overlap. However, with some there needs to be overlap, called cross-titration.

Since some psychiatric drugs may take weeks or months to demonstrate an effect (or an adverse reaction), titration is pretty much just guesswork. There is a general lack of evidence regarding the impact of titration rate on clinical outcomes. There are no specific recommendations on what titration rate is optimal for achieving rapid response while minimizing adverse effects.

The half-life of a drug is the time it takes for the amount of a drug’s active substance in the body to reduce by half. Psychiatric drugs are metabolized in the liver by Cytochrome P450 enzymes in order to be eliminated from the body. A person genetically deficient in these enzymes, or who has an ultrarapid drug metabolism, or who is taking other (legal or illegal) drugs that diminish CYP450 enzyme activity, is at risk of a toxic accumulation of the drug leading to more severe side effects.

Most antipsychotics have an average half-life of 1 day or longer; it can take up to 5 days or more for patients to reach steady-state concentrations with the same daily dose. One would not generally want to titrate the dose until a relatively steady-state concentration was reached.

One recent retrospective study of 149 hospitalized patients on antipsychotics was relatively inconclusive; it was unclear to what extent titration rate either improved symptoms or reduced length of hospital stay. Patients who continued to have their dose increased were less likely to adhere to treatment, due to increasing adverse reactions. Also, delayed adverse effects may occur if dose increases occur sooner than necessary.

Since the 1960s, there has been a large push for patients in psychiatric hospitals to be discharged as quickly as possible. In such an inpatient setting, pressure may be put on prescribers to titrate antipsychotics quickly with the hopes of reducing length of stay and hospitalization costs.

All this goes to show the general lack of predictability in the administration of psychiatric drugs, although it doesn’t even begin to address the fact that these drugs are generally addictive and harmful, and that they are prescribed for fraudulent diagnoses.

One must also keep in mind that the psychiatric industry generally pushes psychotropic drugs without regard to these considerations. This is the direct result of the unscientific psychiatric diagnoses perpetrated by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) which fraudulently justifies prescribing these harmful drugs for profit in the first place.

The real problem is that psychiatrists fraudulently diagnose life’s problems as an “illness”, and stigmatize unwanted behavior or study problems as “diseases.” Psychiatry’s stigmatizing labels, programs and treatments are harmful junk science; their diagnoses of “mental disorders” are a hoax – unscientific, fraudulent and harmful. All psychiatric treatments, not just psychiatric drugs, are dangerous because they preclude finding out the real causes of mental trauma and treating those.

At best one might consider psychotropic drugs as “first aid”; they never have and never will cure any mental trauma. While the patient may be lulled into a temporary sense of wellness, whatever condition has caused the symptom is still present and often growing worse. Psychiatrists have deceived millions into thinking that the best answer to life’s many routine problems and challenges lies with the “latest and greatest” psychiatric drug.

Find Out! Fight Back!

Marketing of Madness
Marketing of Madness

Inflation – What it Really is

Monday, November 22nd, 2021

Why are balloons so expensive? Inflation!

There are those whose vested interests encourage them to obfuscate all with which they tamper. Their livelihoods, so they figure, depend on the masses not understanding their manipulations.

So it is that the whole subject of economics has been compromised with large words, so that these vested interests can manipulate the money supply to their advantage and to the disadvantage of everyone else.

Inflation is really a simple thing, when you come right down to it, in spite of massive efforts to keep it confusing.

So what is it?

Inflation occurs when the amount of money in the country exceeds the amount of things there are to buy. This upsets the whole field of economics. You have a cheapening of money, and that’s inflation — a shortage of goods compared to available money, so money won’t buy what it used to buy.

Inflation is an increase in the volume of money and credit relative to the available goods, resulting in a substantial and continuing rise in the general price level.

There are only two ways out of this situation. One is to do our jobs better and make more money; and the other is to increase production so there is more to buy. Oh, and stop pumping extra money into the economy without increasing production, and stop the political harassment keeping everyone on edge.

When the facilities to produce things are lacking, or when the populace is continuously being disturbed by political machinations, you get inflation.

It really isn’t any more complicated than that. And anyone who tells you differently has something personal to gain out of it.

The opposite situation, or deflation, is equally debilitating. Deflation occurs when the amount of products to buy exceed the amount of money there is to buy things.

The best scenario then is a balance between inflation and deflation. There’s enough money to buy what people want, and there’s enough product to buy with it.

Psychiatric Inflation

This idea extends to other, non-economic fields, such as psychiatry. This is called “diagnostic inflation” — the apparent broadening of the definitions of mental disorders, meaning that more people in the society can be diagnosed with mental disorders, giving the false appearance of increasing mental trauma in society. Diagnoses become less stringently defined, as with the fraudulent diagnoses in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), and their prevalence in society increases as a result. Notable examples of diagnostic inflation include Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), autism, eating disorders, and substance dependence.

The ultimate reason for diagnostic inflation is the fraudulent nature of the DSM, which is not backed by any clinical laboratory measure.

Here are some specific examples of diagnostic inflation in the DSM.

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder has 6 separate entries.
Eating disorder has 4 separate entries.
Various forms of substance abuse have 100 separate entries.
Various forms of sleep disorder have 60 separate entries.

A psychiatrist would be hard-pressed not to find some disorder to fit anyone sitting in front of them, if only the supreme catch-all diagnosis of “Unspecified mental disorder”.

But unlike with monetary inflation, a psychiatric diagnosis is not a product anyone wants to buy.

Recommendations

Educate Yourself – Find Out About psychiatric Fraud and Abuse.

Take Action – Fight Back Against psychiatric Fraud and Abuse.

Report Adverse psychiatric Drug Reactions to the FDA

Report Any Mental Health Abuse to CCHR

Volunteer Some Time

Donate Some Funds

Lawsuit Alleging Missouri Family Court Corruption

Monday, October 4th, 2021

The Eastern District Court of Missouri recused every one of its judges from a lawsuit alleging shocking corruption in the Missouri family court system.

Attorney Evita Tolu originally filed the lawsuit in the 21st Judicial Circuit Court of St. Louis against guardian ad litem Elaine Pudlowski, psychologist Dr. James Reid, and therapist Jennifer Webbe VanLuven, alleging that the trio conspired to diagnose her with a fraudulent mental disorder and use her custody dispute as an opportunity to get rich while sentencing her children to life with their abuser.

The lawsuit alleges a repeating pattern with the psychologist diagnosing a parent with a rare personality disorder they don’t have, which keeps them fighting in court and paying for various services while the guardian declares them unfit.

After Tolu filed the lawsuit, hundreds of Missouri citizens came forward alleging similar stories involving many of the same players.

The ongoing investigation into family court corruption in Missouri is catalogued here.

Psychiatric Fraud in the Justice System

There is a hidden influence in our courts, one which, while loudly asserting its expertise and desire to help, has instead betrayed our most deeply held values and brought us a burgeoning prison population at soaring public costs. That influence is psychiatry and psychology.

When psychiatry and psychology entered the justice and penal systems, they did so under the subterfuge that they understood Man, that they knew not only what made Man act as he did, but that they knew how to improve his lot. This was a lie. The experiment has been a miserable failure.

In the 1940’s, psychiatry’s leaders proclaimed their intention to infiltrate the field of the law and bring about the “re–interpretation and eventually eradication of the concept of right and wrong.” And they did, with the consequence that today, because of their influence, the justice system is failing.

Because of the complete lack of scientific validity, legal and medical experts recommend eliminating psychiatric and psychological testimony from the courts.

Download and read the CCHR report “Eroding Justice—Psychiatry’s Corruption of Law — Report and recommendations on psychiatry subverting the courts and corrective services.

Psychiatrists Redefine “Recovery”

Monday, August 2nd, 2021

Because psychiatry doesn’t work, psychiatrists have had to redefine the idea of “recovery” to ensure their own survival.

The lexicon of psychiatry engenders a false view of the human condition. When such words are used, one should be warned that psychiatry borrows from the language of medicine to look legitimate, but this is only to disguise its utter lack of claim to any authority. An example is the term “mental illness,” a fraudulent usage that implies a medical condition, when psychiatrists know that there is no valid medical, clinical test for any psychiatric diagnosis.

Would you go to a practitioner to treat an illness if you knew that practitioner couldn’t cure that illness? Likely not.

Such is the case with psychiatry – their treatments are not cures. Psychiatric drugs are more akin to over-the-counter cold remedies. They seek to minimize the symptoms of the so called “illness” without ever addressing its cause.

For psychiatrists and pharmaceutical companies, long term treatment of symptoms is far more profitable than a cure. After all, a person with an infection can be cured in very short order with a small regimen of relatively inexpensive antibiotic medications. A person taking expensive new generation antidepressants is a long term customer and far more profitable.

According to the President’s New Freedom Commission on Mental Health (Final Report July 22, 2003), “The discovery of effective treatments using medications currently on the market is also encouraging. However, since these medications are treatments and not cures, some individuals with chronic illnesses, including children, are expected to use these medications over an extended period of time.”

So, psychiatry has had a problem. How do you attract patients if you can’t cure them? The solution to this problem is Public Relations (PR), a careful selection of words and the redefinition of the concept of “recovery”.

Psychiatric front groups openly promote that mental trauma is “treatable” but will never say that it is curable.

Psychiatric proponents believe that people don’t seek psychiatric care because of their negative attitudes about mental trauma and treatments. One of the main negative attitudes is that psychiatric disorders are not curable. To counter public fear and negative attitudes the psychiatric PR machines heavily promote the idea of “recovery”.

We think it is important that you know exactly what psychiatrists mean when they say, “recovery”.

Traditional (allopathic) medical science says, “You’re ill. There is a pathogen or source of your illness. By identifying the cause of the illness we will give you treatment (e.g. medicine or surgery) to eliminate the illness at its source and you will no longer be ill.”

Psychiatry says “You’re ill. We don’t know what causes “mental illness”. We can randomly give you some medications which are known to minimize your symptoms in some people, some of the time. Although we cannot cure your condition there is some hope that over time with adherence to your medication that you may feel not as bad. When you have learned to come to terms with your condition, accept it and function in life despite it, we will consider that you have recovered.”

According to A. Kathryn Power, former Director for the Center for Mental Health Services in the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, “Recovery does not necessarily mean a cure. Recovery is a process, sometimes lifelong, through which a person achieves independence, self-esteem, and a meaningful life in the community.”

Certainly no one will disagree that people should have hope, independence, self-esteem, and a meaningful life in the community. We would wish these things for anyone. But by changing the very nature of the word “recovery” from “cured” to “has hope and is able to live despite a mental condition” we have moved psychiatry even farther away from a science and into the realm of a philosophy or even a religion. One could get the idea of a mental health consumer struggling his whole life to achieve this mythical state called, “recovery”.

You may see a number of public service announcements in the media showing mental health consumers who have “recovered.” Recognize them for what they are. They have not been cured. It’s debatable if they were even ill in the first place. They are however, life-long customers of the psychiatric industry and followers of the new religion of “recovery”.

Recognize that the real problem is that psychiatrists fraudulently diagnose life’s problems as an “illness”, and stigmatize unwanted behavior or study problems as “diseases”.

Psychiatry’s stigmatizing labels, programs and treatments are harmful junk science; their diagnoses of “mental disorders” are a hoax — unscientific, fraudulent and harmful. All psychiatric treatments, not just psychiatric drugs, are dangerous.

Contact your local, state and national officials and tell them what you think about this.

Style Is As Style Does

Monday, May 31st, 2021

Style is the FORM of something.

The word “style” means:
— a distinctive manner of expression or behavior or conduct
— a distinctive quality, form, or type of something
[from Latin stilus, “spike, stem, stylus”]

FASHION is a prevailing style.

A LIFESTYLE is the typical way of life of an individual, group, or culture.

Style In Psychiatry

“Style” appears in the psychiatric billing bible Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) as “Problem related to lifestyle.” With no discussion other than its indication as a billable medical diagnosis, it leaves its interpretation and treatment solely to the opinion of the psychiatrist.

There are suggestions that this diagnosis may be related to problems with physical exercise, diet and eating habits, sexual behavior, gambling, and sleeping patterns; although these have evolved to their own entries in the DSM or ICD (the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Diseases).

Other psychiatric discussions name such things as “parenting style” or “attachment style” when dealing with people’s relationships with others. And psychiatric debates have occurred over whether compulsive shopping for the latest styles should be considered a sign of mental illness.

Now we see that “lifestyle” is being re-defined by the psychiatric industry as a mental illness.

Psychiatric Redefinition of Terms

There is a long history of psychiatry redefining terms to create more advantage for their industry. In their anxiety to keep their failures explained while they lobby governments for more funds, psychiatry continually redefines key words relating to the mind and mental trauma. Psychiatry tries to describe instead of cure; witness the DSM, which is all description and no cures. As a matter of fact, Norman Sartorius, president of the World Psychiatric Association in 1994 said, “The time when psychiatrists considered that they could cure the mentally ill is gone. In the future the mentally ill have to learn to live with their illness.”

The first version of the DSM in 1952 listed 112 disorders. DSM-IV in 1994 listed 374 disorders. The current revision DSM-5 from 2013 has 955 line items.

With the DSM, anyone can be said to have some form of insanity just by saying a big word, leaving the psychiatrist as an “authority” who can only label and not cure. The government billions given to psychiatry bought no cures but only a lot of big words and how they are all incurable.

One should certainly prefer a cure rather than a label. A cure is “Patients recovering and being sent, sane, back into society as productive individuals.” A label leads to no cure, topped off with harmful and addictive psychotropic drugs, or barbaric and damaging “treatments” such as electroconvulsive therapy or psycho-surgery.

Recommendations

1. Mental health homes must be established to replace coercive psychiatric institutions. These must have medical diagnostic equipment, which non-psychiatric medical doctors can use to thoroughly examine and test for all underlying physical problems that may be manifesting as disturbed behavior. Government and private funds should be channeled into this rather than abusive psychiatric institutions and programs that have proven not to work.

2. Establish rights for patients and their insurance companies to receive refunds for psychiatric treatment which did not achieve the promised result or improvement, or which resulted in proven harm to the individual, thereby ensuring that responsibility lies with the individual practitioner and psychiatric facility rather than with the government or its agencies.

3. Government, criminal, educational, judicial and other social agencies should not rely on the DSM and no legislation should use this as a basis for determining the mental state, competency, educational standard or rights of any individual.

The Latest Style
The Latest Style

Depersonalization – Another Fake psychiatric Disorder

Monday, March 29th, 2021

Are you feeling unreal? Are you a stranger to yourself? You may have “Depersonalization Disorder”!

ROFL, forgive me. Like we don’t already have a surfeit of fake diseases in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)! Oh, wait! It’s already in the DSM-5, as “Depersonalization/derealization disorder” (DDD).

There is increasing evidence that psychotropic drugs evoke an unbearable state of mind, such as feeling unreal, feeling detached, feeling like a stranger to oneself, not having sensations, or feeling like a walking cadaver — so much so that the person opts for suicide or violence as a means of relief.

Oh, wait again! This sounds just like some of the side effects, or adverse reactions, of various psychiatric drugs! Note that derealization means that the perception of the world and of external reality are altered. Sounds like a hallucination or delusion, which are known side effects of antidepressants.

For example, newer antidepressants have reported side effects of: abnormal thoughts; agitation; akathisia (severe restlessness); anxiety; confusion; delusions; emotional numbing; hallucinations; mood swings; panic attacks; paranoia; suicidal thoughts or behavior; violent behavior; withdrawal symptoms including deeper depression.

And since DDD is in the DSM, a psychiatrist can prescribe additional harmful and addictive psychiatric drugs for this diagnosis.

Psychiatrists do not know what causes these symptoms or how to cure it, and there are no clinical tests which can diagnose it. Diagnosis is based solely on opinion. Treatment is generally an antidepressant or anti-anxiety drug, often in combination with cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) which is basically telling the patient what is wrong with them (evaluating for them).

There are whole organizations devoted just to DDD, providing a base for requesting research funds, getting articles published, and of course “treating” victims with more psychiatric drugs — when the actual treatment should include getting off the psychiatric drugs which are causing these side effects in the first place.

What about the person who experiences symptoms of so-called DDD without being on any drugs? Well, yes, Life can certainly include trauma needing some kind of relief; but it shouldn’t include drugs which can continue to cause these same symptoms, making the person a patient for life.

So What Actually Is The Condition Known As Depersonalization or Derealization?

A person’s inability to feel the reality of things stems directly from the introduction of some arbitrary consideration — something which has no basis in natural law or fact. This is often called “superstition.” For example, some person is feeling under the weather, and someone tells them “it’s all due to the lack of Prozac in your diet.” The person’s acceptance of this “solution” to their problem causes some unreality, since it is arbitrary and false. The introduction of any arbitrary thing into a problem or a solution invites further arbitraries to help “explain” it away. Eventually, one’s life becomes one exception after another, all arbitraries trying to correct the original misconception and on down the line.

One resolution is to trace back these arbitraries throughout one’s life and get the original one corrected. Obviously, psychiatric drugs cannot do this, as they merely deaden the nervous system to suppress symptoms and can never actually correct any arbitrary.

Recognize that the real problem is that psychiatrists fraudulently diagnose life’s problems as an “illness”, and stigmatize unwanted behavior as “diseases.” Psychiatry’s stigmatizing labels, programs and treatments are harmful junk science; their diagnoses of “mental disorders” are a hoax – unscientific, fraudulent and harmful. All psychiatric treatments, not just psychiatric drugs, are dangerous.

Contact your public officials and tell them what you think about this.

Logic, Superstition, and Psychiatry

Monday, February 15th, 2021

Effective Definitions
Logic — the subject of reasoning; the ability to think clearly and reach correct conclusions. [ultimately from Greek logos “speech, reason, word”]
Superstition — an irrational attitude or notion maintained despite evidence to the contrary. [ultimately from Latin super- “over” + stare “to stand”]

What Is Logic?

Logic is a process of observation and thought that leads to correct conclusions. This process is called “reasoning.” Reason depends upon data. When data is faulty or unobserved the conclusions are unreasonable (i.e. illogical.)

What Is Superstition?

Superstition is the substitution of false or faulty data for correctly observed data leading to incorrect, unreasonable or illogical conclusions.

One of the primary ways superstition takes hold is by having fixed ideas. A fixed idea is something accepted without personal inspection or agreement. It may appear normal or reasonable, but on close observation and inspection can be shown to be faulty.

Sanity and Insanity

It can be seen that sanity is one’s reasoning toward optimum survival. Specifically it is one’s ability to recognize differences, similarities and identities. This is a necessary ability one must have to be logical.
[Sanity: Soundness of judgment or reason; derives ultimately from Latin sanus “healthy”.]

The opposite of sanity is insanity, which can be seen to be faulty reasoning leading toward nonsurvival, or the inability to recognize differences, similarities and identities. The result of this is to be illogical.

Cause and Effect

No amount of logic can replace some good, solid, imaginative superstition, which is the assignment of cause to something or someone other than the person themself.

By this we mean that in the absence of a person’s ability to be responsible and cause things to happen — that is, the person is only being the effect of others — logic is ineffective and superstition will take its place.

Notice that one of the main uses of both logic and superstition in this case is to covertly justify how one is not responsible and has not caused anything. It’s always something or someone else — i.e. “The Why Is God!” syndrome.
Thus, someone will say “It’s only logical” when on close inspection it isn’t logical at all. This red herring leads to no end of superstition and failures.

Psychiatry Is Superstition

In the case of psychiatry, the Why is the Brain. Insanity is all the brain’s fault; and they justify this with both (faulty) logic and (imaginative) superstition. They’ve got it covered.

In the case of psychiatry, neither logic nor superstition is sanity. In fact, psychiatrists do not know what sanity or insanity is, since it is clear that psychiatry cannot distinguish the sane from the insane. This, psychiatrists when pressed about it, readily admit.

We do not know the causes [of any mental illness]. We don’t have the methods of ‘curing’ these illnesses yet.” —Dr. Rex Cowdry, psychiatrist and director of National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), 1995

As a result, all psychiatric diagnoses and treatments are based on superstition, which is called a “pseudoscience.”

The only thing the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is good for is to bill insurance for bogus treatments.

In short, the whole business of creating psychiatric categories of ‘disease,’ formalizing them with consensus, and subsequently ascribing diagnostic codes to them, which in turn leads to their use for insurance billing, is nothing but an extended racket furnishing psychiatry a pseudo-scientific aura. The perpetrators are, of course, feeding at the public trough.” [Dr. Thomas Dorman, Member of the Royal College of Physicians of the United Kingdom and Canada]

Recommendations

Government, criminal, educational, judicial and other social agencies should not rely on the DSM and no legislation should use this as a basis for determining the mental state, competency, educational standard or rights of any individual.

The Missouri Revised Statutes (RSMo) contains several explicit mentions of the DSM in Chapter 376 on Life, Health and Accident Insurance. Contact your Missouri State legislators and ask them to remove all references to the DSM from Missouri State Law.