Individual Results May Vary

We noticed that many pharmaceutical ads carry the phrase “individual results may vary”, or words to that effect. Since we are already skeptical about results claimed by psychiatric drug manufacturers and prescribers, we thought we’d investigate this more thoroughly.

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) makes rules and recommendations about such claims in advertising. FTC 16 CFR 255Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising” is the reference. [CFR = Code of Federal Regulations]

The FTC calls an ad which touts the results of using a product an “endorsement.” It expects that any claims made for the product can be supported by a recognized expert in the field who has examined actual results for safety and efficacy.

The advertiser must either depict the generally expected consumer experience, or clearly and conspicuously disclose the typical experience a consumer can reasonably expect.

The use of the phrase “individual results may vary” is an attempt by the advertiser to “get off the hook” if the product does not produce the claimed results, and the FTC discourages the usage of this or similar qualifications.

Examining manufacturers’ fine print for their psychiatric drugs, we always see words to the effect that “we don’t really know how this drug works,” or “the exact mechanism of action is unknown.” Since they don’t know how the drug really “works”, there is no sure way to guarantee its safety and efficacy; they’re just guessing. Their “experts” then must of necessity use a “safe harbor” in their advertisements, since they cannot actually claim that the drugs work for everyone.

Of course, the drugs are just the tip of the deception. Psychiatrists must first make a diagnosis before they can prescribe a drug. The real problem, then, is that psychiatrists fraudulently diagnose life’s problems as an “illness”, and stigmatize unwanted behavior or study problems asĀ “diseases” or “mental disorders.”

Psychiatry’s stigmatizing labels, programs and treatments are harmful junk science; their diagnoses of “mental disorders” are a hoax – unscientific, fraudulent and harmful. The psychiatric billing bible, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), is a fraudulent hoax designed to sell harmful and addictive drugs in order to keep vulnerable patients coming back for more treatments.

Contact your local, state and federal representatives and let them know what you think about this.
Results May Vary
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