Captured Teen Terrorist Spills The Secret On ISIS

The drug that makes you lose your mind

The Independent Journal Review recently carried a chilling article on ISIS and terrorism.

In an interview with CBS News, a captured teen terrorist opened up about life as an ISIS fighter. When the Islamic State invaded 15-year-old Kareem Mufleh’s village, he was given two awful options: join the jihadists or experience the horror of being beheaded.

He claims that ISIS gave him the anti-anxiety drug Zolam before he went in to battle. “That drug makes you lose your mind,” he said. “If they give you a suicide belt and tell you to blow yourself up, you’ll do it.”

Xanax (generic Alprazolam), also known as Zolam outside the U.S., is a benzodiazepine often prescribed for anxiety. Patients taking one Xanax tablet each day for several weeks could become addicted. Further, after a patient stops taking Xanax, it takes the brain six to eighteen months to recover from severe withdrawal effects.

Known side effects include exreme anger, hostile behavior, and violence, with suicidal tendencies.

Terrorism is created; it is not human nature. Suicide bombers are made, not born. Ultimately, terrorism is the result of madmen bent on destruction, and these madmen are typically the result of psychiatric or psychological techniques aimed at mind and behavioral control. Suicide bombers are not rational—they are weak and pliant individuals psychologically indoctrinated to murder innocent people without compassion, with no concern for the value of their own lives. They are manufactured assassins. Part of that process involves the use of mind–altering psychiatric drugs.

Click here for more information about psychiatry and terrorism.

More About Elliot Rodger and Xanax

More About Elliot Rodger and Xanax

Based on interviews with Elliot’s parents, Peter and Li Chen, the Santa Barbara Sheriff’s Department is being told that he was likely addicted to Xanax (generic name alprazolam), an anti-anxiety drug known to cause psychosis, rage, hostility, and suicide.

Rodger on May 23 killed six people and then himself, in the college town of Isla Vista, California, adjacent to the University of California Santa Barbara campus.

Daily use of therapeutic doses is associated with physical dependence. Addiction can occur after 14 days of regular use. The typical consequences of withdrawal are anxiety, depression, sweating, cramps, nausea, psychotic reactions and seizures. There is also a “rebound effect” where the individual experiences even worse symptoms than they started with as a result of chemical dependency.

Drug experts say that Xanax is more addictive than most illegal drugs, including cocaine or heroin, and once someone is hooked, getting off it can be a tortuous and deadly experience.

Email the Santa Barbara County Sheriff and request that they investigate the role of psychiatric drugs such as Xanax in the violence and suicide of Elliot Rodger.

For more information about violence and suicide caused by psychiatric drugs, download and read the free CCHR booklet Psychiatric Drugs Create Violence and Suicide.

Pill Mill Psychiatrist Disciplined

Effective February 1, 2013, the Medical Board of California placed psychiatrist Nathan Brian Kuemmerle on seven years’ probation, with an actual one year suspension beginning February 17, 2013.

Kuemmerle, who formerly practiced in West Hollywood, was charged with operating a “pill mill” out of his office: writing thousands of narcotics prescriptions for cash, without examining patients.

On May 18, 2011, Nathan Kuemmerle was sentenced in Los Angeles federal court to time served and three years probation, following his January conviction on one charge of distribution of a controlled substance—specifically, 180 tablets of Xanax.

Investigations revealed that Kuemmerle was the number one prescriber of the most powerful dosage of the stimulant drug Adderall in the state of California and the second-highest prescriber of Schedule II controlled substances (the designation used by the federal Drug Enforcement Administration for drugs of greatest danger, addiction and abuse).

Kuemmerle is reported to have written prescriptions for cash, without legitimate medical purposes, to make money to pay for his addiction to methamphetamine.

The Medical Board of California placed conditions on Kuemmerle upon his return to practice: He is prohibited from supervising physician assistants, engaging in the solo act of medicine, and shall not order, prescribe, dispense, administer, furnish, or possess any controlled substances; and, shall not issue an oral or written recommendation or approval to a patient for possession or cultivation of marijuana for personal medical purposes.

YOU CAN HELP spread the word about psychiatric fraud and abuse. Watch the CCHR documentary DVDs and show them to your family, friends, and associates. The fraud is real, the abuse is real, and the truth is real scary – but something can always be done about it. Don’t wait for someone else to do something about it!

Whitney Houston and Xanax

According to Fox News, prescription drugs had been found in the Beverly Hills Hilton hotel room where Houston’s lifeless body was discovered Saturday afternoon just hours before a huge Grammy party she was to attend.

Police discovered a half dozen bottles of medication in Whitney Houston’s room, TMZ reported, adding that family members said Houston had been taking the prescription drug Xanax, which is often used to treat anxiety.

When combined with alcohol, Xanax can cause drowsiness. Houston was reportedly found in her bathtub — TMZ says her head was underwater — and could not be revived by paramedics after being removed from the tub.

No alcohol was found in the preliminary sweep of Houston’s room, TMZ reports, but there were multiple reports that Houston had been drinking with friends the night before at the hotel.

Xanax

The anti-anxiety drug Xanax (generic alprazolam), also called a minor tranquilizer, benzodiazepine, or sedative hypnotic, is associated with physical dependence. Addiction can occur after 14 days of regular use. Side effects can include violence, excessive sedation, decreased attention, and amnesia. After a person stops taking Xanax, it takes the brain six to eighteen months to recover. Drug experts say that Xanax is more addictive than most illegal drugs, including cocaine or heroin, and once someone is hooked, getting off it can be a tortuous and even deadly experience.

Not Xanax

Focusing on the drug, evil as it is, hides the real problem.

Recognize that the real problem is that psychiatrists fraudulently diagnose life’s problems and anxieties as an “illness”, and stigmatize unwanted behavior as  “diseases.” Psychiatry’s stigmatizing labels, programs and treatments are harmful junk science; their diagnoses of “mental disorders” are a hoax – unscientific, fraudulent and harmful.

Some doctor prescribed the Xanax and is not being held accountable.

Not a Fluke

Psychiatry has a long history of attacking and harming artists.

Artists are the individuals who dream our future and create the realities of tomorrow. It is the artist who lifts the spirit, makes us laugh and cry and can even shape the spiritual future of our culture. It is artists who make life. Artists are cherished human assets the world over.

Unfortunately, in many cases, they are assets we have lost too soon – losses that have left us poorer. In recent decades we have all mourned the untimely deaths of great artists who enriched our lives, yet left before their work was done. Luminaries of literature, the screen, the theater and the concert stage, names such as Ernest Hemingway, France’s great writer Antonin Artaud, jazz singer Billie Holiday, Judy Garland, Marilyn Monroe, Vivien Leigh, Kurt Cobain, Michael Hutchence, Phil Hartman and many, many more. And now, Whitney Houston.

Faced with even this partial list, it would be easy to form the impression that the lives of artists are unavoidably tumultuous and that for some, the pressures of success bring demands too great to be borne. It would also be easy to believe that to be a successful artist you must be neurotic or some sort of tragic figure.

None of this is true.

In each of the cases above, hidden influences worked to ensure the deadly outcome. The truth is, each of these great artists and many of the others who have left us were offered “help.” Instead they were betrayed and placed on a path which assured their destruction.

This betrayal came through the direct or indirect influence of psychiatrists or psychologists, who claimed they would help but were, in effect, a destructive influence that left these artists dreadfully damaged – or dead – after their foundations of strength and certainty were torn away.

Today there is an added urgency that this message be heard and understood, for the assault upon artists of every genre has only increased in both volume and efficiency. The weapons now include an array of deadly drugs that masquerade as therapeutic cures, just as the prefrontal lobotomy once did. In Hollywood, the mecca of the entertainment industry, those mind-altering and addictive psychotropic drugs are exacting too high a cost in creative lives.

Find out more about artists harmed by psychiatry by clicking here.