Posts Tagged ‘DSM’

Are You Schizophrenic? More About the Condition

Monday, November 8th, 2021

If you talk to God, you are praying; If God talks to you, you have schizophrenia.

When I was a child in school, it was a common taunt to call someone “schiz.”

I realize now that was cruel; but I also understand that it was a byproduct of misunderstanding the condition. And I believe now that it was also one result of the fraudulent psychiatric labeling of the condition as a “mental illness.”

The German term “schizophrenie” was introduced as another term for “dementia praecox” by the Swiss psychiatrist Eugen Bleuler in 1908.

Schizophrenia is commonly defined as a mental illness with delusional symptoms. As psychiatrists don’t really know what it is, definitions usually include long lists of symptoms, making its diagnosis a matter of opinion rather than fact, but usually defined so vaguely that it is often applied to almost any kind of behavior of which the speaker disapproves.

[schizo from Greek schizein “to split, part, separate”; phren from Greek “mind, wits”; ia from Greek “a suffix forming feminine nouns”]
[dementia from Latin dement “mad”, from de “away” and ment “mind”; praecox from Latin “premature”]

The original definition, referring to a split mind, was in observation of a shift of identity, such that a person may appear to be multiple personalities. It can certainly be triggered by various medical or spiritual conditions. For more information about medical causes, download and read the report “Twenty-Nine Medical Causes of Diagnosis of Schizophrenia.

There are nine separate symptomatic entries in the psychiatric billing bible DSM-5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) with some form of the term, further showing that its etiology is unknown. Psychiatrists remain committed to calling “schizophrenia” a mental disease despite, after a century of research, the complete absence of objective proof that it exists as a physical brain abnormality. So, too, is the absence of any generally effective psychiatric cure.

The Use of Antipsychotics

Psychiatry clings tenaciously to antipsychotics as the “treatment” for so-called “schizophrenia,” despite their proven risks and studies which show that when patients stop taking these drugs, they improve.

11 million Americans (of which over 829,000 are aged 0-17) take antipsychotics. Tardive dyskinesia (TD), a debilitating side effect causing irreversible damage, occurs in 20%-50% of patients taking antipsychotics. Potentially between 2.23 and 5.57 million Americans can be permanently damaged by antipsychotic drugs.

“The person who walks the street having a spirited conversation with himself, his body jerking and tongue lolling about, is in the grip of TD—prescription drug-induced bodily damage,” Rev. Fred Shaw, spokesperson for CCHR International and president of the NAACP Inglewood-South Bay branch, said. He has long spoken out against the over-representation of African Americans prescribed antipsychotics and founded an educational website Task Force Against Racism and Modern-Day Eugenics.

Antipsychotics and Foster Care Children

Antipsychotic drugs are among Medicaid’s most costly and commonly prescribed drugs, particularly for foster children.

State Medicaid programs spent over $2.8 billion on antipsychotics for all ages in 2007, the single largest drug expenditure category for Medicaid. A decade later it was reported to be $3.5 billion—a 25% increase. Nationally, about 12% of all the nation’s 500,000 foster care children had received Medicaid-paid antipsychotics at some point.

In Missouri, roughly 13,000 children under age 18 are in the foster care system, with about 25% of them prescribed harmful psychiatric drugs. On December 5, 2019, United States District Court Judge Nanette Laughrey granted final approval to a Joint Settlement Agreement regarding children in Missouri foster care and the overuse of harmful psychotropic drugs.

Recommendation

No one denies that people can have difficult problems in their lives, that at times they can be mentally unstable, subject to unreasonable depression, anxiety or panic. Mental health care is therefore both valid and necessary. However, the emphasis must be on workable mental healing methods that improve and strengthen individuals and thereby society by restoring people to personal strength, ability, competence, confidence, stability, responsibility and spiritual well–being. Psychiatric drugs and psychiatric treatments are not workable.

Metaphoric Disease

The Anatomy of Thought

Monday, October 25th, 2021

Logic is the subject of reasoning. It is the ability to think clearly, make appropriate connections, and reach correct conclusions.

When an individual’s reasoning is sane, they are able to recognize the differences, similarities and identities between the things they observe.

When an individual’s reasoning is insane, they are unable in greater or lesser degree to recognize differences, similarities and identities.

One common failing is someone’s inability to tell the difference between a fact and an opinion. Wherever you have these kinds of thought confusions, everyone around is at risk, since misunderstandings tend to pile up and create hostilities.

Logical Reasoning

Logical reasoning is a form of thinking in which premises and relations between premises are used in a rigorous manner to infer conclusions that are entailed (or implied) by the premises and their relations.
Here are three interesting ways to attempt to solve a logical problem:

1. The Full Sweep
Examine each and every possible combination of factors and outcomes.

2. The Fell Swoop
Come to a realization of the final solution all at one time, in one sudden leap of insight. “Fell” in this sense means “fierce” or “vigorous.”

3. The Frail Swipe
A half-hearted attempt, likely failing to reach a fully satisfactory conclusion.

Faulty psychiatric Reasoning

The psychiatric biological, medical model is the view that mental illness is a medical disease of the brain. It is faulty reasoning because it is not generally true. This faulty reasoning leads to an inability to cure insanity and restore sane and logical thought to those whose thought processes have been compromised.

The only evidence that makes mental illness a disease are the symptoms used by psychiatrists to label someone mentally ill. But the symptoms used to diagnose someone as mentally ill (such as despair, hopelessness, sadness, or guilt) are not biological markers. There is no evidence that these expressions are physical in nature. There is however ample evidence that such symptoms are educational, emotional, ethical, or spiritual in nature.

As the ultimate in irony and arrogance, psychiatry’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) includes religion as a category of mental illness: “Religious or spiritual problem.”

Unlike medical diagnoses that convey a probable cause, appropriate treatment and likely prognosis, the disorders listed in the DSM are terms arrived at through peer consensus — a vote by American Psychiatric Association (APA) committee members. In other words, there is no objective science to them.

While it is true that people can have serious problems in life, psychiatrists turn these unwanted emotions and behaviors into brain diseases, without a shred of proof, which psychiatrists readily admit.

To re-define Man’s problems and criminal conduct in medical or biological terms is a trick to substitute illogic for logic, making it virtually impossible to come up with effective treatments for insanity — meaning that the psychiatric industry has a permanent pool of patients and is forever dependent upon government funding to keep it going.

It’s time to solve the problems of mental trauma with a Full Sweep or a Fell Swoop, instead of the psychiatric Frail Swipe.

Recommendation

Persons in desperate circumstances must be provided proper and effective medical care. Medical — not psychiatric — attention. Good nutrition, a healthy, safe environment, activity that promotes confidence and effective education will do far more for a troubled person than drugging, electric shocks, brain surgery, involuntary commitment, restraints, and other psychiatric atrocities.

Is That Going To Be A Problem?

Monday, July 12th, 2021

Problems are huge now. Everyone has one or more of them. Seems like everyone accuses someone else of them. They are therefore a ripe subject for our blog. There’s a lot to know about the subject.

Some things to know about Problems

A problem is as important as it is related to survival.
The human mind’s basic purpose is the posing and resolving of problems related to survival.
Problems begin with an unpredictability.
Problems are a necessary component of games.
One might say that the best problem is one that never solves.
The old maxim “If you want something done, give it to a busy person to do,” expresses the idea that a person suffers if they do not have enough problems. A person chafes and grows bored when there is a total lack of problems. Giving a busy person one more thing to do adds to their problems, and thus they suffer less.
On the other hand, enough unsolved problems add up to a huge confusion. The balance between too few problems and too many of them is critical, and varies from person to person and time to time.

Some definitions of the word

Problem:
— A question or puzzle raised for inquiry, consideration, or solution.
— A source of perplexity, distress, or vexation.
— Something or someone difficult to achieve, deal with, or control.
— A matter or situation regarded as unwelcome or harmful and needing to be dealt with and overcome.

[From Greek problema, “obstacle”, from proballein “to throw forward”, from pro- “forward” + ballein “to throw”.]

Even better definitions, ones which lead to methods of resolution, are:
— Two or more opposed purposes; also expressed as Purpose versus Counter-purpose.
— Intention versus Counter-intention.
— Postulate versus Counter-postulate.
— Something that persists because it contains a lie or altered facts, since if it were totally truth it wouldn’t be a problem.

Problems and Creativity

Creation is a primary ability of a person. Unfortunately when a person loses their ability to create, about the only thing they can create is a problem. So somebody comes along and says, “Let’s all be happy and healthy.” Next thing you know, all you can see are problems about being happier or healthier. When the problems get too great to do something about, what happens then? One creates lies, because the lowest order of creation is lying, and the problem will then persist because it contains a lie.

Problems and Psychiatry

Problems are no stranger to psychiatrists. In fact, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is full of problems. (While the DSM itself is a problem, here we mean that many different problems are described in the DSM as mental disorders.)

Let’s give some examples. These are problem-related mental disorders listed in the DSM-5 for which psychiatrists can prescribe harmful and addictive psychotropic drugs:

— Academic or educational problem
— Other problem related to employment
— Other problem related to psychosocial circumstances
— Parent-child relational problem
— Phase of life problem
— Problem related to current military deployment status
— Problem related to lifestyle
— Problem related to living alone
— Problem related to living in a residential institution
— Problems related to multiparity [i.e. five or more childbirths]
— Problems related to other legal circumstances
— Problems related to release from prison
— Problems related to unwanted pregnancy
— Religious or spiritual problem
— Sibling relational problem
— Unspecified housing or economic problem
— Unspecified problem related to social environment
— Unspecified problem related to unspecified psychosocial circumstances

The Problem of Psychiatry

Psychiatry itself is a problem of magnitude. While psychiatry claims to be the arbiter of good and bad mental health, it has demonstrated over many years that it cannot cure any mental problems.

In fact, psychiatry invents the very problems that it then fraudulently claims to handle. Mental “disorders” are voted into and out of existence based on factors that have nothing to do with medicine. Psychiatry admits that it has not proven the cause or source of a single “mental illness;” the DSM is simply a list of symptoms.

Recommendations

The DSM should be removed from use in all government agencies, departments and other bodies including criminal, educational and justice systems. None of the mental disorders in the DSM should be eligible for insurance coverage because they have no scientific, physical validation. Provide funding and insurance coverage only for proven, workable treatments that verifiably and dramatically improve or cure mental health problems.

Contact your local, state and federal officials and representatives to express your viewpoints about this.

Style Is As Style Does

Monday, May 31st, 2021

Style is the FORM of something.

The word “style” means:
— a distinctive manner of expression or behavior or conduct
— a distinctive quality, form, or type of something
[from Latin stilus, “spike, stem, stylus”]

FASHION is a prevailing style.

A LIFESTYLE is the typical way of life of an individual, group, or culture.

Style In Psychiatry

“Style” appears in the psychiatric billing bible Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) as “Problem related to lifestyle.” With no discussion other than its indication as a billable medical diagnosis, it leaves its interpretation and treatment solely to the opinion of the psychiatrist.

There are suggestions that this diagnosis may be related to problems with physical exercise, diet and eating habits, sexual behavior, gambling, and sleeping patterns; although these have evolved to their own entries in the DSM or ICD (the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Diseases).

Other psychiatric discussions name such things as “parenting style” or “attachment style” when dealing with people’s relationships with others. And psychiatric debates have occurred over whether compulsive shopping for the latest styles should be considered a sign of mental illness.

Now we see that “lifestyle” is being re-defined by the psychiatric industry as a mental illness.

Psychiatric Redefinition of Terms

There is a long history of psychiatry redefining terms to create more advantage for their industry. In their anxiety to keep their failures explained while they lobby governments for more funds, psychiatry continually redefines key words relating to the mind and mental trauma. Psychiatry tries to describe instead of cure; witness the DSM, which is all description and no cures. As a matter of fact, Norman Sartorius, president of the World Psychiatric Association in 1994 said, “The time when psychiatrists considered that they could cure the mentally ill is gone. In the future the mentally ill have to learn to live with their illness.”

The first version of the DSM in 1952 listed 112 disorders. DSM-IV in 1994 listed 374 disorders. The current revision DSM-5 from 2013 has 955 line items.

With the DSM, anyone can be said to have some form of insanity just by saying a big word, leaving the psychiatrist as an “authority” who can only label and not cure. The government billions given to psychiatry bought no cures but only a lot of big words and how they are all incurable.

One should certainly prefer a cure rather than a label. A cure is “Patients recovering and being sent, sane, back into society as productive individuals.” A label leads to no cure, topped off with harmful and addictive psychotropic drugs, or barbaric and damaging “treatments” such as electroconvulsive therapy or psycho-surgery.

Recommendations

1. Mental health homes must be established to replace coercive psychiatric institutions. These must have medical diagnostic equipment, which non-psychiatric medical doctors can use to thoroughly examine and test for all underlying physical problems that may be manifesting as disturbed behavior. Government and private funds should be channeled into this rather than abusive psychiatric institutions and programs that have proven not to work.

2. Establish rights for patients and their insurance companies to receive refunds for psychiatric treatment which did not achieve the promised result or improvement, or which resulted in proven harm to the individual, thereby ensuring that responsibility lies with the individual practitioner and psychiatric facility rather than with the government or its agencies.

3. Government, criminal, educational, judicial and other social agencies should not rely on the DSM and no legislation should use this as a basis for determining the mental state, competency, educational standard or rights of any individual.

The Latest Style
The Latest Style

A Truly Great Library Contains Something To Offend Everyone

Monday, May 3rd, 2021

“He who takes offense when offense was not intended is a fool, yet he who takes offense when offense is intended is an even greater fool for he has succumbed to the will of his adversary.” –Brigham Young

Offense and Offend, two related words of wide contemporary usage. Here are a few different meanings (we take wide liberties with grammar):

– something that outrages
– the act of displeasing or affronting
– the state of being insulted or morally outraged
– to transgress
– to violate a law or rule
– to cause difficulty, discomfort, or injury
– to cause dislike, anger, or vexation

[Ultimately from Latin offendere “to strike against, displease” from of- “on account of” + -fendere “to hit”.]

We mention these words because we notice a large amount of social commentary and speculation about those taking or giving offense.

In particular, we notice an apparent spike in instances where someone has taken offense at another, or at another’s opinion, or at least remarking on such; whether such offense was intended or not.

We’ve noticed this tendency more and more frequently over the last few years, and wondered what possible relation this could have with psychiatric and psychological infiltration into society.

We’re not the only ones who have noticed this phenomenon. Psychology Today published various articles about it, although we don’t think they accurately attributed its cause.

Sensitivity Training Destroys Personal Responsibility

Psychiatry’s deliberate infiltration of religion and pastoral counseling provides some clues. Psychiatrists first sought to replace religion with their “soulless science” in the late 1800’s. In 1940, psychiatry openly declared its anti-religion plans when British psychiatrist John Rawling Rees, a co–founder of the World Federation for Mental Health (WFMH), spoke of psychiatry infiltrating the Church.

Another co–founder of the WFMH, Canadian psychiatrist G. Brock Chisholm, reinforced this master plan in 1945 when he spoke about freeing the race from crippling religious values.

As a result of psychiatry’s subversive plan for religion, the concepts of good and bad behavior, right and wrong conduct and personal responsibility have taken such a beating that people today have few or no guidelines for checking, judging or directing their behavior. The consequences have been devastating for both society and religion.

Sensitivity Training developed by psychologists in the 1950’s spread rapidly to religious leaders and churches, invalidating personal responsibility in favor of lowered moral standards, leaving a confused populace open to being morally outraged, i.e. offended, by nearly anything.

Since 1967, morals have been usurped through the education system with the implementation of “Values Clarification.” Part of the Outcome-Based Education (OBE) package of techniques, “Values Clarification” emerged from Germany and was introduced into the U.S. classroom under various names, including Sensitivity Training, Self-Esteem training, Anger Management and Conflict Resolution, to name a few. None are any more than mental techniques designed to modify behavior – or more bluntly, alter beliefs and lower personal responsibility.

Psychiatric Folly

If a person acts in ways that annoy, upset or offend psychiatrists, they may be diagnosed as mentally ill and treated against their will.

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) has an entry called “Intermittent explosive disorder”, which means repeated, sudden episodes of impulsive, aggressive, violent behavior or angry verbal outbursts which are out of proportion to the situation.

In other words, psychiatrists can call you mentally ill and prescribe harmful and addictive psychotropic drugs if you give or take offense. This should act as a warning not to call your psychiatrist names.

Then again, some of these drugs have side effects which look to an outsider as if the person does have such a disorder. Aggressive or hostile behavior is a side effect of psychostimulants, newer antidepressants, antipsychotics, and anti-anxiety drugs. Of course, if you experience such side effects, you can also be diagnosed with the mental disorder “Other adverse effect of medication”, so psychiatrists can label you mentally ill whether you are taking their drugs or not.

If you know of any psychiatrist or psychologist who has committed a legal offense, a sexual offense, financial irregularity, malpractice, fraud or any other crime, report this to the police and to CCHR.

You’re Not Paranoid, It’s Really Happening

Monday, April 26th, 2021

Paranoia is an unfounded or exaggerated distrust of others, sometimes reaching delusional proportions. The word comes from the Greek word paranous “distracted”, ultimately from para- “irregular” + nous “mind”.

It’s a popular psychiatric designation, occurring in the fraudulent Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) as “Paranoid personality disorder”. As “paranoid schizophrenic” it can also come under one of the several DSM headings related to schizophrenia, meaning “delusions of persecution”.

It’s also the subject of various jokes such as:

“The mental-disease-of-the-month club is being disbanded because during paranoia month all the members moved and left no forwarding address.”
“What does a paranoid have in common with the all-knowing master of time space and dimension that secretly controls all of our lives? … Right, like you don’t know.”

What is it really?

Paranoia is a dramatization, which is an irrational set of thoughts and actions coming about from the restimulation of past moments of pain and unconsciousness, often containing a phrase such as “You’re all against me.” Some drugs in particular can restimulate this type of behavior.

Various Other Restimulants of Paranoia

Newer antidepressants such as Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) may have a side effect of paranoia. Smoking crack cocaine, marijuana, or taking LSD, methamphetamines or ecstasy (MDMA) can also cause paranoid behavior. The ADHD drugs Adderall, Concerta, Strattera, and Ritalin all have a potential side effect of paranoia. The psychedelic dimethyltryptamine (DMT) has a side effect of paranoia.

Being bullied may lead to a feeling that people plan to harm you, which can be misconstrued by a psychiatrist as a “mental illness” and considered a psychotic symptom for which psychotropic drugs can be prescribed, some of which then also have more paranoia as a side effect.

Addressing a person’s difficulties with getting a good night’s sleep, or with getting proper nutrition, may lead to improvements in psychotic symptoms such as paranoia.

Hypothyroidism, an insufficient production of thyroid hormone, can lead to paranoia.

A deficiency of vitamin B12 or folic acid (vitamin B9) can produce paranoia.

An allergic response to wheat, corn, cow’s milk, or tobacco can produce paranoia.

Undiagnosed and unhandled infections such as pneumonia, urinary tract infection, sepsis, malaria, Legionnaire’s disease, syphilis, typhoid, diphtheria, HIV, rheumatic fever and herpes can all cause such devastating mental symptoms.

Recommendations

One can plainly see that the symptom of paranoia has many possible triggers which are unrelated to any so-called psychiatric “mental disorder”.

Any medical doctor who takes the time to conduct a thorough physical examination of a person exhibiting signs of what a psychiatrist calls paranoia can find undiagnosed, untreated physical conditions. Any person labeled as paranoid needs to receive a thorough physical examination by a competent medical—not psychiatric—doctor to first determine what underlying physical condition is causing the manifestation.

The use of various psychiatric drugs, since they can themselves trigger a paranoid response, should be specifically avoided.

Any person falsely diagnosed as paranoid which results in treatment that harms them should file a complaint with the police and professional licensing bodies and have this investigated. They should seek legal advice about filing a civil suit against any offending psychiatrist and his or her hospital, associations and teaching institutions seeking compensation.

Going On Hoping

Monday, April 5th, 2021

Hope is the desire that sometime in the future, one will cease to have something which is no longer wanted but one can’t seem to get rid of (like a chronic pain), or that one will acquire something wanted.

“Going On Hoping” is the condition where one continues to hope in spite of no possibility of realizing one’s goal, particularly when one is not actively involved in realizing the goal.

Giving something a lick and a promise and hoping it will somehow be all right stems from laziness and stupidity. I hope that doesn’t offend anyone.

The better alternative is to control one’s environment by doing things well and thoroughly, leading to one’s goals.

The Psychiatric Way

Psychiatrists speak about “adaptation to one’s environment” as the way to handle Life. One of the primary ways psychiatric treatment attempts to adapt one to one’s environment is with drugs, which reduce or block restimulative stimuli by deadening the perceptive abilities of the central nervous system.

Many psychiatric studies on the topic emphasize how one’s environment, over which one apparently has little control, influences or controls one’s troubles. Toxins and contaminants in the environment; stress in the environment; one’s genes; one’s community and its social factors; the climate; PTSD; crime and other violent or dangerous situations in the environment; endemic systemic pandemic polemics.

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), psychiatry’s billing bible, promotes these environmental factors against which one supposedly cannot fight back as the diagnostic criteria showing the presence of a “mental disorder”. One such is the diagnosis of “Victim of crime.”

Of course, one can certainly find situations where it is helpful to adapt to an environment. Think of wearing a protective suit in a hostile environment such as outer space or under water.

We don’t minimize these environmental factors, which have been found to be major contributors to mental stress and trauma. Rather, we point out that the common psychiatric point of view is to only find ways a person can adapt to such stress, when there might also be ways to exert more control over the environmental factors and adapt the environment to oneself. There are even terms to describe this psychiatric viewpoint, such as “stress-adapted children”; meaning that they have learned how to adapt to stress in their environments.

In fact, the data indicate that drug treatment is not usually necessary if a proper interpersonal environment and social context is provided as alternatives to psychiatry.

The Better Alternative

It has also been found that if one knows the technology of how to do something and can do it, and uses it, he cannot be the adverse effect of it. So for example in the matters under discussion here, the more one knows about something in the environment, and the more one can handle and control that, the less bad effects it can cause one. This leads to the insight that the more one can adapt the environment to oneself, instead of only adapting oneself to the environment, then the less the environment can harm one.

One may exclaim all kinds of ifs, ands and buts in the matter. But the fact remains that it behooves one to find out more about whatever the trouble is, and search diligently for ways to influence or control that.

Recommendations

CCHR recommends various strategies to proactively cope with psychiatric fraud or abuse, an environmental stress to which one may be subjected. For example:

The Motto here is “FIND OUT! FIGHT BACK!

Depersonalization – Another Fake psychiatric Disorder

Monday, March 29th, 2021

Are you feeling unreal? Are you a stranger to yourself? You may have “Depersonalization Disorder”!

ROFL, forgive me. Like we don’t already have a surfeit of fake diseases in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)! Oh, wait! It’s already in the DSM-5, as “Depersonalization/derealization disorder” (DDD).

There is increasing evidence that psychotropic drugs evoke an unbearable state of mind, such as feeling unreal, feeling detached, feeling like a stranger to oneself, not having sensations, or feeling like a walking cadaver — so much so that the person opts for suicide or violence as a means of relief.

Oh, wait again! This sounds just like some of the side effects, or adverse reactions, of various psychiatric drugs! Note that derealization means that the perception of the world and of external reality are altered. Sounds like a hallucination or delusion, which are known side effects of antidepressants.

For example, newer antidepressants have reported side effects of: abnormal thoughts; agitation; akathisia (severe restlessness); anxiety; confusion; delusions; emotional numbing; hallucinations; mood swings; panic attacks; paranoia; suicidal thoughts or behavior; violent behavior; withdrawal symptoms including deeper depression.

And since DDD is in the DSM, a psychiatrist can prescribe additional harmful and addictive psychiatric drugs for this diagnosis.

Psychiatrists do not know what causes these symptoms or how to cure it, and there are no clinical tests which can diagnose it. Diagnosis is based solely on opinion. Treatment is generally an antidepressant or anti-anxiety drug, often in combination with cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) which is basically telling the patient what is wrong with them (evaluating for them).

There are whole organizations devoted just to DDD, providing a base for requesting research funds, getting articles published, and of course “treating” victims with more psychiatric drugs — when the actual treatment should include getting off the psychiatric drugs which are causing these side effects in the first place.

What about the person who experiences symptoms of so-called DDD without being on any drugs? Well, yes, Life can certainly include trauma needing some kind of relief; but it shouldn’t include drugs which can continue to cause these same symptoms, making the person a patient for life.

So What Actually Is The Condition Known As Depersonalization or Derealization?

A person’s inability to feel the reality of things stems directly from the introduction of some arbitrary consideration — something which has no basis in natural law or fact. This is often called “superstition.” For example, some person is feeling under the weather, and someone tells them “it’s all due to the lack of Prozac in your diet.” The person’s acceptance of this “solution” to their problem causes some unreality, since it is arbitrary and false. The introduction of any arbitrary thing into a problem or a solution invites further arbitraries to help “explain” it away. Eventually, one’s life becomes one exception after another, all arbitraries trying to correct the original misconception and on down the line.

One resolution is to trace back these arbitraries throughout one’s life and get the original one corrected. Obviously, psychiatric drugs cannot do this, as they merely deaden the nervous system to suppress symptoms and can never actually correct any arbitrary.

Recognize that the real problem is that psychiatrists fraudulently diagnose life’s problems as an “illness”, and stigmatize unwanted behavior as “diseases.” Psychiatry’s stigmatizing labels, programs and treatments are harmful junk science; their diagnoses of “mental disorders” are a hoax – unscientific, fraudulent and harmful. All psychiatric treatments, not just psychiatric drugs, are dangerous.

Contact your public officials and tell them what you think about this.

Logic, Superstition, and Psychiatry

Monday, February 15th, 2021

Effective Definitions
Logic — the subject of reasoning; the ability to think clearly and reach correct conclusions. [ultimately from Greek logos “speech, reason, word”]
Superstition — an irrational attitude or notion maintained despite evidence to the contrary. [ultimately from Latin super- “over” + stare “to stand”]

What Is Logic?

Logic is a process of observation and thought that leads to correct conclusions. This process is called “reasoning.” Reason depends upon data. When data is faulty or unobserved the conclusions are unreasonable (i.e. illogical.)

What Is Superstition?

Superstition is the substitution of false or faulty data for correctly observed data leading to incorrect, unreasonable or illogical conclusions.

One of the primary ways superstition takes hold is by having fixed ideas. A fixed idea is something accepted without personal inspection or agreement. It may appear normal or reasonable, but on close observation and inspection can be shown to be faulty.

Sanity and Insanity

It can be seen that sanity is one’s reasoning toward optimum survival. Specifically it is one’s ability to recognize differences, similarities and identities. This is a necessary ability one must have to be logical.
[Sanity: Soundness of judgment or reason; derives ultimately from Latin sanus “healthy”.]

The opposite of sanity is insanity, which can be seen to be faulty reasoning leading toward nonsurvival, or the inability to recognize differences, similarities and identities. The result of this is to be illogical.

Cause and Effect

No amount of logic can replace some good, solid, imaginative superstition, which is the assignment of cause to something or someone other than the person themself.

By this we mean that in the absence of a person’s ability to be responsible and cause things to happen — that is, the person is only being the effect of others — logic is ineffective and superstition will take its place.

Notice that one of the main uses of both logic and superstition in this case is to covertly justify how one is not responsible and has not caused anything. It’s always something or someone else — i.e. “The Why Is God!” syndrome.
Thus, someone will say “It’s only logical” when on close inspection it isn’t logical at all. This red herring leads to no end of superstition and failures.

Psychiatry Is Superstition

In the case of psychiatry, the Why is the Brain. Insanity is all the brain’s fault; and they justify this with both (faulty) logic and (imaginative) superstition. They’ve got it covered.

In the case of psychiatry, neither logic nor superstition is sanity. In fact, psychiatrists do not know what sanity or insanity is, since it is clear that psychiatry cannot distinguish the sane from the insane. This, psychiatrists when pressed about it, readily admit.

We do not know the causes [of any mental illness]. We don’t have the methods of ‘curing’ these illnesses yet.” —Dr. Rex Cowdry, psychiatrist and director of National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), 1995

As a result, all psychiatric diagnoses and treatments are based on superstition, which is called a “pseudoscience.”

The only thing the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is good for is to bill insurance for bogus treatments.

In short, the whole business of creating psychiatric categories of ‘disease,’ formalizing them with consensus, and subsequently ascribing diagnostic codes to them, which in turn leads to their use for insurance billing, is nothing but an extended racket furnishing psychiatry a pseudo-scientific aura. The perpetrators are, of course, feeding at the public trough.” [Dr. Thomas Dorman, Member of the Royal College of Physicians of the United Kingdom and Canada]

Recommendations

Government, criminal, educational, judicial and other social agencies should not rely on the DSM and no legislation should use this as a basis for determining the mental state, competency, educational standard or rights of any individual.

The Missouri Revised Statutes (RSMo) contains several explicit mentions of the DSM in Chapter 376 on Life, Health and Accident Insurance. Contact your Missouri State legislators and ask them to remove all references to the DSM from Missouri State Law.

Eroding Justice—Psychiatry’s Corruption of Law

Monday, January 4th, 2021

Reference:
United Nations Promoting Sustainable Development

Resolution adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on 25 September 2015
Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

Sustainable: Of, relating to, or being a method or lifestyle for using resources so that the resources can be maintained and continued, and are not depleted or permanently damaged.

[from Old French sustenir (French: soutenir), from Latin sustineo, sustinere, from sub– (under) + teneo (hold, uphold, possess, guard, maintain)]

The U.N. Sustainable Development Goals

The 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) and their 169 associated targets adopted in 2015 and accepted by all Member States seek to realize the human rights of all and balance economic, social and environmental factors towards peace and prosperity for all.

To this end we examine some of the existing factors which block or inhibit the realization of these goals, and which must be eliminated so that the goals can be achieved in practice.

SDG 16: Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels.

Target 16.3: Promote the rule of law at the national and international levels and ensure equal access to justice for all.

How Psychiatry Obstructs Target 16.3

When psychiatry entered the justice and penal systems, it did so under the subterfuge that it understood Man, that it knew not only what made Man act as he did, but that it knew how to improve his lot. This was a lie. Psychiatry has had opportunity to prove itself. The experiment has been a miserable failure.

In the 1940’s, psychiatry’s leaders proclaimed their intention to infiltrate the field of the law and bring about the “re–interpretation and eventually eradication of the concept of right and wrong.” And they did, with the consequence that today, because of their influence, the justice system is failing.

The psychiatric “insanity defense” and its derivatives have done the most damage. The psychiatric industry jumping on the “not guilty by reason of insanity” (NGRI) bandwagon has lead to a massive erosion of public confidence in the justice system’s ability to mete out swift and equitable justice.

Psychiatric “expert” witnesses are widely criticized for providing testimony to suit their clients’ purposes.

Psychiatry, using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), has warped the justice system to protect criminals instead of protecting society from criminals.

With each new failure to rehabilitate the criminally insane, psychiatry merely asks for more money since they are unable to cure anyone.

A major part of the “treatment” for prison inmates is a regimen of powerful psychotropic drugs, despite numerous studies showing that aggression and violence are tied to their use.

Because of the complete lack of scientific validity, legal and medical experts recommend eliminating psychiatric and psychological testimony from the courts.

Psychiatric fraud and abuse must be eradicated so that SDG 16 can occur.

Our Criminal Justice System