How psychiatry Perpetuates Unemployment

Reference:
United Nations Promoting Sustainable Development
Resolution adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on 25 September 2015 “Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

Sustainable: Of, relating to, or being a method or lifestyle for using resources so that the resources can be maintained and continued, and are not depleted or permanently damaged.

[from Old French sustenir (French: soutenir), from Latin sustineo, sustinere, from sub– (under) + teneo (hold, uphold, possess, guard, maintain)]

The U.N. Sustainable Development Goals

The 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) and their 169 associated targets adopted in 2015 and accepted by all Member States seek to realize the human rights of all and balance economic, social and environmental factors towards peace and prosperity for all.

To this end we examine some of the existing factors which block or inhibit the realization of these goals, and which must be eliminated so that the goals can be achieved in practice.

SDG 8: Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all.

Target 8.5: By 2030, achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all women and men, including for young people and persons with disabilities, and equal pay for work of equal value.

How Psychiatry Obstructs Target 8.5

As an example, take the St. Louis Independence Center, a nonprofit organization which “helps adults with mental illness access services to live and work in the community, independently and with dignity.”

The Independence Center works to find employment and housing for vulnerable people. While this is a laudable goal, their “path to restoring lives” has one major troublesome aspect: the vulnerable person must see a psychiatrist to start a psychiatric treatment plan and get psychiatric drugs.

No one denies that people can have difficult problems in their lives, that at times they can be mentally unstable, subject to unreasonable depression, anxiety or panic. Mental health care is therefore both valid and necessary. However, the emphasis must be on workable mental healing methods that improve and strengthen individuals and thereby society by restoring people to personal strength, ability, competence, confidence, stability, responsibility and spiritual well–being. Psychiatric drugs and psychiatric treatments are not workable.

The larger problem is that the biological drug model (based on bogus mental disorders) is a disease marketing campaign which prevents governments from funding real medical solutions for people experiencing difficulty. There is a great deal of evidence that medical conditions can manifest as psychiatric symptoms, and that there are non–harmful medical treatments that do not receive government funding because the psychiatric/pharmaceutical industry spends billions of dollars on advertising and lobbying efforts to counter any medical modality that does not support the false biological drug model of mental disorders as a disease.

Because the general public, the government and the multitude of funding organizations have all been so misled by the psychiatric and pharmaceutical industries about the actual dangers of psychotropic drugs and other psychiatric treatments, they have bought into the lie that the rehabilitation of the unemployed must be accompanied by psych drugs.

One study showed that, compared with normal children, children taking psychotropic drugs for so-called ADHD had lower academic attainment, higher rates of unauthorized absence from school, and were more likely to be unemployed.

Psychiatric fraud and abuse must be eradicated so that SDG 8 can occur.
Unemployed

How psychiatry Perpetuates Itself Through Environmental Psychology

Reference:
United Nations Promoting Sustainable Development
Resolution adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on 25 September 2015
Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

Sustainable: Of, relating to, or being a method or lifestyle for using resources so that the resources can be maintained and continued, and are not depleted or permanently damaged.

[from Old French sustenir (French: soutenir), from Latin sustineo, sustinere, from sub– (under) + teneo (hold, uphold, possess, guard, maintain)]

The U.N. Sustainable Development Goals

The 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) and their 169 associated targets adopted in 2015 and accepted by all Member States seek to realize the human rights of all and balance economic, social and environmental factors towards peace and prosperity for all.

To this end we examine some of the existing factors which block or inhibit the realization of these goals, and which must be eliminated so that the goals can be achieved in practice.

SDG 7: Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy
for all.

Target 7.a: By 2030, enhance international cooperation to facilitate access to clean energy research and technology, including renewable energy, energy efficiency and advanced and cleaner fossil-fuel technology, and promote investment in energy infrastructure and clean energy technology.

How Psychiatry Obstructs Target 7a

Joel Stephen Kovel (1936–2018) was an American psychiatrist known as a founder of “eco-socialism”. He ran for the Green Party’s presidential nomination in 2000.

Eco-socialism is an ideology merging aspects of socialism with that of green politics, generally believing that the expansion of the capitalist system is the cause of social exclusion, poverty, war and environmental degradation through globalization and imperialism.

Kovel believed it is more important to restructure societies to reduce energy use before relying on renewable energy technologies alone. As a staunch socialist he was vehemently anti-capitalism and anti-globalization. We imagine this would have made him antagonistic to the United Nations and its Sustainable Development Goals.

Environmental Psychology

Apparently, though, one of the primary influences of environmental psychology is not a direct attack on renewable clean energy, but rather a profusion of psychological research and publications detailing the psychological trauma leading to mental health problems due to environmental concerns and effects, which of course can be profitably managed by expanding the funding and influence of psychologists and psychiatrists.

The United Nations also recognizes that achieving SDG 7 is related to the promotion of mental health. The unfortunate aspect of this is that the current international model for promoting mental health involves psychiatric and psychological services which are also known to be harmful.

Psychiatrists and psychologists proclaim a worldwide epidemic of mental health problems and urge massive funding increases as the only solution — funding that should rather be given, for example, to promoting access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all. Decades of psychiatric monopoly over mental health has only lead to upwardly spiraling mental illness statistics and continuously escalating funding demands.

The claim that only increased funding will cure the problems of psychiatry has lost its ring of truth. Psychiatry and psychology should be held accountable for the funds already given them, and irrefutably and scientifically prove the physical existence of mental disorders they claim should be treated and covered by insurance in the same way as physical diseases are.

The many critical challenges facing societies today reflect the vital need to strengthen individuals through workable, viable and humanitarian alternatives to harmful psychiatric options.

Psychiatric fraud and abuse must be eradicated so that SDG 7 can occur.
Eco-Anxiety

How psychiatry Perpetuates Drug Side Effects

Reference:
United Nations Promoting Sustainable Development
Resolution adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on 25 September 2015
“Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

Sustainable: Of, relating to, or being a method or lifestyle for using resources so that the resources can be maintained and continued, and are not depleted or permanently damaged.

[from Old French sustenir (French: soutenir), from Latin sustineo, sustinere, from sub– (under) + teneo (hold, uphold, possess, guard, maintain)]

The U.N. Sustainable Development Goals

The 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) and their 169 associated targets adopted in 2015 and accepted by all Member States seek to realize the human rights of all and balance economic, social and environmental factors towards peace and prosperity for all.

To this end we examine some of the existing factors which block or inhibit the realization of these goals, and which must be eliminated so that the goals can be achieved in practice.

SDG 6: Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all.

Target 6.3: By 2030, improve water quality by reducing pollution, eliminating dumping and minimizing release of hazardous chemicals and materials, halving the proportion of untreated wastewater and substantially increasing recycling and safe reuse globally.

How Psychiatry Obstructs Target 6.3

Pharmaceuticals are increasingly prevalent in our drinking water. Here are some quotes from PBS Nova:
“In 1999, Christian Daughton, an environmental chemist from the Environmental Protection Agency, wrote a paper along with Thomas Ternes of ESWE-Institute for Water Research and Water Technology in Germany that called attention to the persistence of pharmaceuticals in the freshwater cycle.”

“One study found several pharmaceuticals in treated tap water, including … meprobamate (an antianxiety medication).”

Here is another quote:
“In 2017, a study published by Rio de Janeiro State University found that both treated wastewater and untreated wastewater had the same concentration of psychoactive drugs. Traditional treatment methods aren’t getting the job done.”

And another:
“…researchers have identified traces of pharmaceutical drugs in the drinking water supplies of some 40 million Americans. … And antidepressants … can ‘alter the behavior and reproductive functions of fish and mollusks.'”

And one more recent quote:
“Psychoactive drugs – including antidepressants – are altering the reproductive behaviour, anxiety levels, and anti-predator responses of fish in the wild, according to Australia’s Monash University.”

Google reports about 818,000 results when searching for the phrase “psychotropic drugs in the water supply.” It’s obviously a serious and current consideration, since there can be horrific side effects from psychiatric drugs

And if people are experiencing mental or physical ill effects for no apparent reason, it is that much more difficult to diagnose and treat the symptoms. When was the last time you were given a blood test to see if there were traces of psychiatric drugs in your body? 

The U.S. Food & Drug Administration’s MedWatch program for Adverse Event Reporting cannot help protect consumers from the risk of drug side effects if no one is reporting side effects because they cannot attribute them to any specific drug, particularly if they are only ingesting the drug in their drinking water.

Recognize that the real problem is that psychiatrists fraudulently diagnose life’s problems as an “illness”, and stigmatize unwanted behavior or study problems as “diseases,” then compound the abuse by fraudulently prescribing harmful and addictive mind-altering psychiatric drugs which can then make their way into the water supply.

Psychiatric fraud and abuse must be eradicated so that SDG 6 can occur.
Psych drugs are now being detected in the water supply.

How psychiatry Perpetuates Gender Inequality

Reference:
United Nations Promoting Sustainable Development
Resolution adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on 25 September 2015
“Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

Sustainable: Of, relating to, or being a method or lifestyle for using resources so that the resources can be maintained and continued, and are not depleted or permanently damaged.

[from Old French sustenir (French: soutenir), from Latin sustineo, sustinere, from sub– (under) + teneo (hold, uphold, possess, guard, maintain)]

The U.N. Sustainable Development Goals

The 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) and their 169 associated targets adopted in 2015 and accepted by all Member States seek to realize the human rights of all and balance economic, social and environmental factors towards peace and prosperity for all.

To this end we examine some of the existing factors which block or inhibit the realization of these goals, and which must be eliminated so that the goals can be achieved in practice.

SDG 5: Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls.

Target 5.1: End all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere.

How Psychiatry Obstructs Target 5.1

According to the European Union Parliament “Report on improving the mental health of the population” (A6-0249/2006), “women … are prescribed twice as many psychotropic drugs as men … [and] pharmacokinetic studies have shown that women have less tolerance to such products”.

So, apparently psychiatrists know that women react more negatively to psychotropic drugs than men, but are given twice as many harmful and addictive psychotropic drugs as men.

Furthermore, the same report “Criticises the growing medicalisation of the processes and stages of development of women’s and girls’ bodies, as a result of which puberty, pregnancy or menopause are increasingly being defined as ‘illnesses’ or ‘disorders’ …”

Much of the expansion of psychiatry in the past few decades has been based on a fraudulent brain model that encourages psychiatric drug treatment as a panacea for multiple problems, many of which are actually real medical, social, ethical or spiritual conditions and not mental illnesses or brain abnormalities.

The general term “medicalization” (or the equivalent spelling “medicalisation”) means that non-medical problems, such as normal life events, become defined and treated as medical problems, usually as illnesses or disorders, so that they can be “treated” by psychiatrists with psychotropic drugs, instead of finding out their etiology and appropriately treating the real issues.

Here are some examples of medicalization:
— Various forms of addiction are medicalized so that they can be suppressed with psychotropic drugs, rather than handling the root physical, social and ethical aspects of the addiction.

— As referenced here, gender-related issues are being considered as mental illnesses and suppressed with psychotropic drugs instead of determining the actual medical, social, ethical, or spiritual underlying causes and addressing those.

Gender Discrimination in the DSM

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) labels some specific gender-related behaviors as mental illnesses. There are four entries in DSM-5 of “Gender dysphoria” [dysphoria: a state of unease or generalized dissatisfaction with life, from Greek dusphoros “hard to bear”]. There are four DSM entries specifically for female issues: “Premenstrual dysphoric disorder”, “Female orgasmic disorder”, “Female sexual interest/arousal disorder”, and “Genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorder”. Not to mention that the DSM considers that being a victim of sexual abuse is a mental disorder (“Personal history (past history) of sexual abuse”). And, as always, the catch-all category for everyone else, “Unspecified sexual dysfunction.”

Psychiatric fraud and abuse must be eradicated so that SDG 5 can occur.
Having an unpleasant feeling.

How psychiatry Perpetuates Illiteracy

Reference: United Nations Promoting Sustainable Development
Resolution adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on 25 September 2015: “Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

Sustainable: Of, relating to, or being a method or lifestyle for using resources so that the resources can be maintained and continued, and are not depleted or permanently damaged.
[from Old French sustenir (French: soutenir), from Latin sustineo, sustinere, from sub– (under) + teneo (hold, uphold, possess, guard, maintain)]

The U.N. Sustainable Development Goals

The 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) and their 169 associated targets adopted in 2015 and accepted by all Member States seek to realize the human rights of all and balance economic, social and environmental factors towards peace and prosperity for all.

To this end we examine some of the existing factors which block or inhibit the realization of these goals, and which must be eliminated so that the goals can be achieved in practice.

SDG 4: Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all 

Target 4.6: By 2030, ensure that all youth and a substantial proportion of adults, both men and women, achieve literacy and numeracy

How Psychiatry Obstructs Target 4.6

Children worldwide are under extremely dangerous assault. Parents and teachers are being deceived in the name of improved mental health and better education. The results are devastating.

In 1967, a group of psychiatrists met in Puerto Rico to discuss their objectives for psychotropic drug use on “normal humans” in the year 2000. Their plan included drugs to “enhance the learning capacity of the individual.” Today, with at least 17 million children worldwide consuming mind-altering drugs and the almost exclusive use of psychology-based curricula in many schools, literacy is fast becoming a thing of the past.

In the U.S. alone, 1.5 million children and adolescents on antidepressants are at risk of known, drug-induced violent or suicidal side effects; while education achievement standards have plummeted as a result of psychology-based education curricula.

According to educators, traditional academics have been jettisoned in favor of psychological behavior modification that places emotions above educational outcomes.

In Basic Principles of Curriculum and Instruction, Ralph Tyler, president of the Carnegie Foundation (provider of private funding for education and testing), wrote that the “real purpose of education is … to bring about significant changes in the students’ pattern of behavior.” It meant targeting the child’s emotions, feelings, beliefs, and as a secondary objective, his intellect.

The current psychiatric push for mandatory “mental illness screening” in schools funnels children directly into the mental health care system, leading to rising illiteracy, crime, drug abuse and suicide rates.

School mental health programs have been designed to channel the lives of children towards specific ideological objectives at the expense of their literacy and well-being. Instead of directing children toward genuine achievement and the demonstration of competence, the psychiatric “self-esteem” concept is to tell the child he has accomplished something whether he has or not.

Psychiatric drugs and programs in schools have been implicated in increasing child violence. Skyrocketing youth suicide rates have also followed in the wake of widespread psychiatric, drug-based, child programs and psychological school curricula.

Research analyst Diane Alden stated, “We have had years of counseling, therapy, drugs and touchy-feely non-academics, and what we have gotten for this is dumb kids who feel good about being dumb and violent.”

Ultimately, psychiatry and psychology must be eliminated from all education systems and their coercive and unworkable methods should never be funded by the State.

Find out more by downloading and reading the CCHR report “Harming Youth — Psychiatry Destroys Young Minds — Report and recommendations on harmful mental health assessments, evaluations, and programs within our schools.

Psychiatric fraud and abuse must be eradicated so that SDG 4 can occur.

How psychiatry Perpetuates Mental Unhealthiness

Reference: United Nations Promoting Sustainable Development
Resolution adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on 25 September 2015: “Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

Sustainable: Of, relating to, or being a method or lifestyle for using resources so that the resources can be maintained and continued, and are not depleted or permanently damaged.
[from Old French sustenir (French: soutenir), from Latin sustineo, sustinere, from sub– (under) + teneo (hold, uphold, possess, guard, maintain)]

The U.N. Sustainable Development Goals

The 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) and their 169 associated targets adopted in 2015 and accepted by all Member States seek to realize the human rights of all and balance economic, social and environmental factors towards peace and prosperity for all.

To this end we examine some of the existing factors which block or inhibit the realization of these goals, and which must be eliminated so that the goals can be achieved in practice.

SDG 3: Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages

Target 3.4: By 2030, reduce by one third premature mortality from non-communicable diseases through prevention and treatment and promote mental health and wellbeing

How Psychiatry Obstructs Target 3.4

It’s the “promote mental health and wellbeing” that psychiatry fails at.

The psychiatric industry purports to be the sole arbiter on the subject of mental health. The facts, however, demonstrate otherwise.

In medicine, strict criteria exist for calling a condition a disease. Diseases are proven to exist by objective evidence and physical tests. Yet, no psychiatric “diseases” have ever been proven to medically exist, and there are no clinical tests for so-called mental illnesses.

Psychiatrists do not know the causes or cures for any mental disorder or what their “treatments” specifically do to the patient. They have only theories and conflicting opinions about the diagnoses and methods, and are lacking any scientific basis for these. As a past president of the World Psychiatric Association stated, “The time when psychiatrists considered that they could cure the mentally ill is gone. In the future, the mentally ill have to learn to live with their illness.”

One prevailing psychiatric theory (key to psychotropic drug sales) is that mental disorders result from a chemical imbalance in the brain. As with its other theories, there is no biological or other evidence to prove this. There are no tests available for assessing the chemical status of a living person’s brain.

The brain is not the real cause of life’s problems. People do experience problems and upsets in life that may result in mental troubles, sometimes very serious. But to represent that these troubles are caused by incurable “brain diseases” that can only be alleviated with dangerous pills is dishonest, harmful and often deadly. Such drugs are often more potent than a narcotic and capable of driving one to violence or suicide. They mask the real cause of problems in life and debilitate the individual, so denying him or her the opportunity for real recovery and hope for the future.

Of course, the real problem is that psychiatrists fraudulently diagnose life’s problems as an “illness”, and stigmatize unwanted behavior or study problems as “diseases.” Psychiatry’s stigmatizing labels, programs and treatments are harmful junk science; their diagnoses of “mental disorders” are a hoax — unscientific, fraudulent and harmful. All psychiatric treatments, not just psychiatric drugs, are dangerous.

Psychiatry must be eradicated so that SDG 3 can occur.

How psychiatry Perpetuates Hunger and Malnutrition

Reference:  United Nations Promoting Sustainable Development

Resolution adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on 25 September 2015

“Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development”

Sustainable: Of, relating to, or being a method or lifestyle for using resources so that the resources can be maintained and continued, and are not depleted or permanently damaged.

[from Old French sustenir (French: soutenir), from Latin sustineo, sustinere, from sub- (under) + teneo (hold, uphold, possess, guard, maintain)]

The U.N. Sustainable Development Goals

The 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) and their 169 associated targets adopted in 2015 and accepted by all Member States seek to realize the human rights of all and balance economic, social and environmental factors towards peace and prosperity for all.

To this end we examine some of the existing factors which block or inhibit the realization of these goals, and which must be eliminated so that the goals can be achieved in practice.

SDG 2: End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and
promote sustainable agriculture

Target 2.2: By 2030, end all forms of malnutrition, including achieving, by 2025, the internationally agreed targets on stunting and wasting in children under 5 years of age, and address the nutritional needs of adolescent girls, pregnant and lactating women and older persons.

How Psychiatry Obstructs Target 2.2

The possible side effects of common psychiatric drugs typically include adverse health and nutritional effects that would interfere with proper growth and digestion, particularly for children whose tolerance for adverse reactions may be lower than that of adults. There are approximately 8 million children in the U.S. who are regularly being given psychiatric drugs, and up to 20 million worldwide.

Here are some examples of such side effects.

Psychostimulants (such as ADHD drugs): anorexia, liver problems, loss of appetite, stomach pain, stunted growth, vomiting, weight loss.

Newer antidepressants (such as SSRIs): changes in ability to taste food, heartburn, loss of appetite, indigestion, nausea, problems with teeth, stomach pain, sudden upset stomach, vomiting, weight loss.

Older antidepressants: changes in appetite or weight, constipation, diarrhea, difficulty swallowing, gas, heartburn, jaw spasms, liver problems, nausea, stomach pain, vomiting, swelling of the throat or tongue, unusual taste in the mouth.

Antipsychotics (major tranquilizers or neuroleptics): birth defects, blood disorders, blood-sugar abnormalities, constipation, liver failure, diabetes, diarrhea, difficulty swallowing, excessive weight gain, heartburn, hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, indigestion, loss of appetite, nausea, pancreatitis, sore throat, vomiting.

Anti-anxiety drugs: susceptibility to infection, changes in appetite, constipation, diarrhea, seizures, heartburn, liver problems, nausea, stomach pain, swelling of the tongue or throat, upset stomach, vomiting, weight changes.

Barbiturates: kidney disease, liver disease, upset stomach.

Lithium: change in the ability to taste food, constipation, decreased appetite, diabetes, diarrhea, gas, indigestion, loss of appetite, nausea, seizures, stomach pain, swelling of the tongue or throat, thyroid problems, tongue pain, vomiting, weight gain or loss.

Of course, the real problem is that psychiatrists fraudulently diagnose life’s problems as an “illness”, and stigmatize unwanted behavior or study problems as “diseases.” Psychiatry’s stigmatizing labels, programs and treatments are harmful junk science; their diagnoses of “mental disorders” are a hoax — unscientific, fraudulent and harmful. All psychiatric treatments, not just psychiatric drugs, are dangerous.

Psychiatry must be eradicated so that SDG 2 can occur.

How psychiatry Perpetuates Poverty

Reference:  United Nations Promoting Sustainable Development
Resolution adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on 25 September 2015
“Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development”
Sustainable: Of, relating to, or being a method or lifestyle for using resources so that the resources can be maintained and continued, and are not depleted or permanently damaged.
[from Old French sustenir (French: soutenir), from Latin sustineo, sustinere, from sub- (under) + teneo (hold, uphold, possess, guard, maintain)]

The U.N. Sustainable Development Goals

The 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) and their 169 associated targets adopted in 2015 and accepted by all Member States seek to realize the human rights of all and balance economic, social and environmental factors towards peace and prosperity for all.

To this end we examine some of the existing factors which block or inhibit the realization of these goals, and which must be eliminated so that the goals can be achieved in practice.

SDG 1: End poverty in all its forms everywhere.

Target 1.5: By 2030, build the resilience of the poor and those in vulnerable situations and reduce their exposure and vulnerability to climate-related extreme events and other economic, social and environmental shocks and disasters.

How Psychiatry Obstructs Target 1.5

One-fourth of America’s children live in extreme poverty. Poor children are likelier to be given harmful and addictive antipsychotics, particularly children in the foster care system. Children covered by Medicaid are given powerful antipsychotic drugs at a rate four times higher than children whose parents have private insurance.

There is a clear psychiatric intention to keep poor people poor by inundating them with harmful psychotropic drugs by fraudulently diagnosing them with fake mental diseases. Contrary to psychiatric opinion, children are not “experimental animals,” they are human beings who have every right to expect protection, care, love and the chance to reach their full potential in life. They will only be denied this from within the verbal and chemical straitjackets that are psychiatry’s labels and drugs.

Psychiatry must be eradicated so that SDG 1 can occur.