Posts Tagged ‘psychiatric hoax’

Logic, Superstition, and Psychiatry

Monday, February 15th, 2021

Effective Definitions
Logic — the subject of reasoning; the ability to think clearly and reach correct conclusions. [ultimately from Greek logos “speech, reason, word”]
Superstition — an irrational attitude or notion maintained despite evidence to the contrary. [ultimately from Latin super- “over” + stare “to stand”]

What Is Logic?

Logic is a process of observation and thought that leads to correct conclusions. This process is called “reasoning.” Reason depends upon data. When data is faulty or unobserved the conclusions are unreasonable (i.e. illogical.)

What Is Superstition?

Superstition is the substitution of false or faulty data for correctly observed data leading to incorrect, unreasonable or illogical conclusions.

One of the primary ways superstition takes hold is by having fixed ideas. A fixed idea is something accepted without personal inspection or agreement. It may appear normal or reasonable, but on close observation and inspection can be shown to be faulty.

Sanity and Insanity

It can be seen that sanity is one’s reasoning toward optimum survival. Specifically it is one’s ability to recognize differences, similarities and identities. This is a necessary ability one must have to be logical.
[Sanity: Soundness of judgment or reason; derives ultimately from Latin sanus “healthy”.]

The opposite of sanity is insanity, which can be seen to be faulty reasoning leading toward nonsurvival, or the inability to recognize differences, similarities and identities. The result of this is to be illogical.

Cause and Effect

No amount of logic can replace some good, solid, imaginative superstition, which is the assignment of cause to something or someone other than the person themself.

By this we mean that in the absence of a person’s ability to be responsible and cause things to happen — that is, the person is only being the effect of others — logic is ineffective and superstition will take its place.

Notice that one of the main uses of both logic and superstition in this case is to covertly justify how one is not responsible and has not caused anything. It’s always something or someone else — i.e. “The Why Is God!” syndrome.
Thus, someone will say “It’s only logical” when on close inspection it isn’t logical at all. This red herring leads to no end of superstition and failures.

Psychiatry Is Superstition

In the case of psychiatry, the Why is the Brain. Insanity is all the brain’s fault; and they justify this with both (faulty) logic and (imaginative) superstition. They’ve got it covered.

In the case of psychiatry, neither logic nor superstition is sanity. In fact, psychiatrists do not know what sanity or insanity is, since it is clear that psychiatry cannot distinguish the sane from the insane. This, psychiatrists when pressed about it, readily admit.

We do not know the causes [of any mental illness]. We don’t have the methods of ‘curing’ these illnesses yet.” —Dr. Rex Cowdry, psychiatrist and director of National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), 1995

As a result, all psychiatric diagnoses and treatments are based on superstition, which is called a “pseudoscience.”

The only thing the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is good for is to bill insurance for bogus treatments.

In short, the whole business of creating psychiatric categories of ‘disease,’ formalizing them with consensus, and subsequently ascribing diagnostic codes to them, which in turn leads to their use for insurance billing, is nothing but an extended racket furnishing psychiatry a pseudo-scientific aura. The perpetrators are, of course, feeding at the public trough.” [Dr. Thomas Dorman, Member of the Royal College of Physicians of the United Kingdom and Canada]

Recommendations

Government, criminal, educational, judicial and other social agencies should not rely on the DSM and no legislation should use this as a basis for determining the mental state, competency, educational standard or rights of any individual.

The Missouri Revised Statutes (RSMo) contains several explicit mentions of the DSM in Chapter 376 on Life, Health and Accident Insurance. Contact your Missouri State legislators and ask them to remove all references to the DSM from Missouri State Law.

Individual Results May Vary

Monday, May 11th, 2020
We noticed that many pharmaceutical ads carry the phrase “individual results may vary”, or words to that effect. Since we are already skeptical about results claimed by psychiatric drug manufacturers and prescribers, we thought we’d investigate this more thoroughly.

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) makes rules and recommendations about such claims in advertising. FTC 16 CFR 255Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising” is the reference. [CFR = Code of Federal Regulations]

The FTC calls an ad which touts the results of using a product an “endorsement.” It expects that any claims made for the product can be supported by a recognized expert in the field who has examined actual results for safety and efficacy.

The advertiser must either depict the generally expected consumer experience, or clearly and conspicuously disclose the typical experience a consumer can reasonably expect.

The use of the phrase “individual results may vary” is an attempt by the advertiser to “get off the hook” if the product does not produce the claimed results, and the FTC discourages the usage of this or similar qualifications.

Examining manufacturers’ fine print for their psychiatric drugs, we always see words to the effect that “we don’t really know how this drug works,” or “the exact mechanism of action is unknown.” Since they don’t know how the drug really “works”, there is no sure way to guarantee its safety and efficacy; they’re just guessing. Their “experts” then must of necessity use a “safe harbor” in their advertisements, since they cannot actually claim that the drugs work for everyone.

Of course, the drugs are just the tip of the deception. Psychiatrists must first make a diagnosis before they can prescribe a drug. The real problem, then, is that psychiatrists fraudulently diagnose life’s problems as an “illness”, and stigmatize unwanted behavior or study problems as “diseases” or “mental disorders.”

Psychiatry’s stigmatizing labels, programs and treatments are harmful junk science; their diagnoses of “mental disorders” are a hoax – unscientific, fraudulent and harmful. The psychiatric billing bible, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), is a fraudulent hoax designed to sell harmful and addictive drugs in order to keep vulnerable patients coming back for more treatments.

Contact your local, state and federal representatives and let them know what you think about this.
Results May Vary

Profiting from mental ill-health

Sunday, March 4th, 2012

Profiting from mental ill-health

There’s a reason psychiatrists prescribe drugs rather than talking therapy: the latter makes no money for pharmaceutical firms

Psychotherapist Harriet Fraad of New York City lambasts psychiatric drugs:

“Do these psycho pharmaceuticals work to restore mental health? Actually, the evidence is overwhelming that they fail. Antidepressants, the most popular psycho-pharmaceuticals, work no better than placebos. They work 25% of the time and stop working when the user stops taking them. In addition, they may actually harm patients in the long run. They disrupt brain neurotransmitters and may usurp the brain’s organic soothing functions.

“All 30 of the available antidepressants have suffered lawsuits within five years of their appearance on the market. These suits are often settled with large payments and gag clauses. … Every major company selling anti-psychotics – Bristol Meyers Squibb, Eli Lilly, Pfizer, Johnson and Johnson and AstraZeneca – has either settled investigations for healthcare fraud or is currently being investigated for it.

“Experts agree that there is no long-term improvement in children’s lives from taking anti-psychotic drugs. In fact, these drugs have a substantiated pattern of metabolic problems and rapid weight gain that often leads to diabetes. The use of bipolar diagnoses and bipolar medications is one small example of how market-driven mental healthcare works in the United States. It illustrates the transformation of US healthcare into a system dominated by some of the richest corporations in the world.

“Caring about profit is first, and that is why psychiatry has turned to drug therapy.”


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Of course, we do not recommend psychiatric treatment of any kind, drugs or talk therapy. There are good reasons why we do not recommend psychiatric treatment. We do recommend informed consent, and sound medical diagnosis and treatment. For more information, download and read the free CCHR booklet, “Psychiatric Hoax — The Subversion of Medicine.”