Supporting and Treating Officers In Crisis Act of 2019

Introduced by Republican Missouri Senator Josh Hawley, the “Supporting and Treating Officers In Crisis Act of 2019” (S. 998) was signed into law by President Trump on July 25, 2019.

This bill reauthorizes and expands certain Department of Justice grant programs to provide mental health, stress reduction, psychological services, suicide prevention services, and training for identifying, reporting, and responding to officer mental health crises and suicide, for law enforcement officers and their families. The bill authorizes up to $7,500,000 in appropriations each year for fiscal years 2020 to 2024, a maximum total of $37.5 million.

This sounds eminently socially acceptable, and indeed the bill was widely supported by Congress and various national advocacy groups.

The Real Crisis in Mental Health

While society certainly owes significant consideration and support to law enforcement officers (LEOs) and their families, we can’t help noting that in today’s environment, “mental health and suicide prevention services” really means psychiatric drugs and other harmful psychiatric treatments.

The real crisis in mental health care today is not officer stress, but psychiatric fraud and abuse.

While the bill specifically calls for evidence-based programs, the evidence actually shows that psychiatrists don’t know what causes mental trauma, are unable to predict violence or suicide, and cannot cure any mental disorder they claim to treat.

Psychiatric Fraud

By their own admission psychiatrists cannot predict violence or suicide, and often release violent patients from facilities, claiming that they are not a threat. In 1979, an American Psychiatric Association’s task force admitted in its Brief Amicus Curiae to the U.S. Supreme Court that psychiatrists could not predict dangerousness. It informed the court that “‘dangerousness’ is neither a psychiatric nor a medical diagnosis, but involves issues of legal judgment and definition, as well as issues of social policy.” In addition to not being able to predict violent behavior, psychiatrists certainly have no cures for it, a fact that even they admit.

Psychiatric diagnoses are not based on science, but opinion. Psychiatrists do not have any scientific or medical test to diagnose a person’s mental condition and rely upon faulty observation and opinion of behavior. They admit to not knowing the cause of a single mental disorder or how to cure them. The error in their opinions is enormous — they condemn the innocent, release the dangerous, induce violence in others through drugs and commit people who are not in need of help or turn those away who may genuinely be in need of it.

Recommendations

Rather than training psychiatrists and psychologists about LEO mental health, the grants should be used to train LEOs, security personnel, teachers, coroners, and other professionals to recognize that irrational, violent and suicidal behavior could be caused by psychiatric drugs.

Click here to download and read the CCHR report “Psychiatric Drugs Create Violence & Suicide — School Shootings & Other Acts of Senseless Violence.”

Click here to download and readPsychiatrists Cannot Predict or Cure Violence.

It’s All In Your Brain (Not!)

The Year of the Brain

President Obama announced The BRAIN Initiative (Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies) on April 2, 2013. The White House wanted to spend $100 million taxpayer dollars in 2014 on brain research.

We had little faith that $100 million would be used for developing anything but more abusive psychiatric drugs or more torturous devices such as Vagus Nerve Stimulation or Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation.

The problem is that the biological brain drug model based on bogus mental disorders in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) prevents governments from funding real medical solutions for people experiencing difficulty.

Despite the billions of government and pharmaceutical company funding in support of psychiatry’s brain chemical imbalance theory, this psychiatric “disease” model has been thoroughly debunked. The whole theory was invented to push drugs for profit.

The Brain of the Year

But it’s not just a matter of psychiatric drugs. The entire psychiatric and psychological industries are oriented on the brain. They have a number of names for it: neuropsychology, neuropsychiatry, neurocomputation, neurological psychology, neurological psychiatry — it all just means that psychiatry and psychology, in another attempt to make their pseudosciences seem more scientific, have joined up with the legitimate neuroscience field, in another attempt to blame it all on the brain. You might as well just blame it on the Bossa Nova.

One research paper claims that perception is often biased, selective, and malleable, and it all happens in the brain with neural activity.

Granted, the brain does play a role in perception. The brain might even be fooled by a trompe l’oeil, a visual illusion. But if you buy in to the cry that “it’s all brain” then you have abandoned your humanity, and your spirit, in favor of chemistry; you have bought into the reductio ad absurdum argument that there is no objective reality, it’s all in your brain.

Of course, once the psychopharmaceutical industry gives all its attention to the brain, then the brain is miraculously transformed into the seat of consciousness, and altering consciousness with drugs becomes commonplace. And we get the disastrous psychedelic psychiatric movement, where magic mushrooms will lead you to a better life.

Apparently enough time has passed that the public has forgotten what happened when psychedelics gained notoriety in the 1960s, when LSD pushed by psychiatrists spread into society as a recreational drug and started destroying lives with induced psychosis.

Brain Dead

Knowing nothing about the underlying causes of serious mental disturbance, psychiatry still sears the brain with electroshock, tears it with psychosurgery and deadens it with dangerous drugs.

Next time you are told that a psychiatric condition is due to a biochemical imbalance in the brain, ask if you can see the lab test results. There won’t be any.

The true resolution of many mental difficulties begins, not with a checklist of symptoms, but with ensuring that a competent, non-psychiatric health care professional completes a thorough physical examination.

If It’s Not The Brain, What Is It?

Rather than get all metaphysical, let’s just observe that for many questions, there is not just one answer. That’s a particularly relevant observation for psychiatric, brain and drug based research — the search for the One Thing that answers “Why did this happen?” This attitude only leads to a list of things, a list of symptoms, say, in the DSM.

Using the DSM, a psychiatrist need only label the patient with a single “mental disorder”, prescribe a drug and bill the patient’s insurance. The psychiatrist with the DSM in hand can try various diagnostic labels on the patient as if they were different sizes of apparel until he finds one that either fits the patient’s symptoms or comes close enough to allow him to bill the patient’s insurance. It’s the One Answer, you see, to all the patient’s problems. At least, it’s the only one needed to submit an insurance claim.

But the question, “Why is the patient behaving this way?” does not have just one answer; it can have many, many answers.

Let’s give an example, the classic Country Blues one.
Question: “Why do I feel so blue?”
Answer: My dog ran away. My wife left me. My husband left me. (We’re not sexist here.) My truck died. I’m broke. I’m broken hearted. I’ve been betrayed. No one really cares. No one ever listens to me. I did you wrong and now you’re gone.

You see, there’s more than one answer, and it isn’t “you’re depressed and need to take an antidepressant.”

It wasn’t the brain, you see. It was the dog, the wife, and the truck. It all piled on until the stress of it overwhelmed. You get the idea.

So what is the resolution of mental trauma? Well, each answer would have it’s own resolution. Get another dog, get another wife, get another truck, listen to others so they listen to you. Whatever it takes. You get the idea, again. An antidepressant makes the feeling go away, for a time (it makes ALL feelings go away, the good and the bad); but the dog is still gone, the wife is still gone, and the truck is still broken. And you can be sure your psychiatrist isn’t listening to you, except to hear for which DSM symptom he can prescribe a drug and bill your insurance.

So of course one’s perception can be biased, selective and malleable. It isn’t, however, the brain. It’s Life. Get Over It!

Psychiatric Destruction of Justice

We still see regular news stories about one criminal or another being sentenced to the state’s mental health system after pleading mental incompetence.

“Not Guilty by Reason of Insanity” (NGRI) is an aspect of criminal procedure, defined in the Missouri Revised Statutes Chapter 552 Section 30 as “A person is not responsible for criminal conduct if, at the time of such conduct, as a result of mental disease or defect such person was incapable of knowing and appreciating the nature, quality, or wrongfulness of such person’s conduct.”

The normal result of the court’s acceptance of an NGRI plea is the involuntary commitment of the accused to the Department of Mental Health for custody in a secure state mental health facility.

CCHR has documented many thousands of individual cases that demonstrate that psychiatric drugs and other brutal psychiatric practices actually create insanity and cause violence. Particularly, the neuroleptic [nerve seizing] drugs forced onto patients in institutions and in the community not only create the sort of violence or mental incompetence that would give apparent cause for involuntary incarceration, they also place the patient at greater risk mentally and physically.

When psychiatry entered the justice and penal systems, it did so under the subterfuge that it understood man, that it knew not only what made man act as he did, but that it knew how to improve his lot. This was a lie. Psychiatry has had opportunity to prove itself. The experiment has been a miserable failure.

In the 1940s, psychiatry’s leaders proclaimed their intention to infiltrate the field of the law and bring about the “re-interpretation and eventually eradication of the concept of right and wrong.”
[Canadian Psychiatrist G. Brock Chisholm]

A 1954 decision by the Federal Court of Appeals in Washington, D.C. held that a mentally defective person is not criminally responsible for unlawful acts. This, and the psychiatric industry jumping on the NGRI bandwagon, has lead to a massive erosion of public confidence in the justice system’s ability to mete out swift and equitable justice.

Once there was the idea that a person is responsible for his own actions; so how is it that we face the absurd situation of psychiatrists testifying to excuse the wrongdoers’ actions?

It all started in 1812, when psychiatrist Benjamin Rush claimed that crime was a mental disease, curable by psychiatry.

Today, psychiatric “expert witnesses” are paid an average of $3,600 per day to testify for whomever is willing to foot the bill.

The late Dr. Thomas Szasz said, “Crimes are acts we commit. Diseases are biological processes that happen to our bodies. Mixing these two concepts by defining behaviors we disapprove of as diseases is a bottomless source of confusion and corruption.” If a dangerous offense is committed by a person, then the fact remains criminal statutes exist to address this. As Szasz also said, “All criminal behavior should be controlled by means of the criminal law, from the administration of which psychiatrists ought to be excluded.”

Compassion decrees that the criminal must be given the opportunity to face up to what he has done and reform himself to become a productive member of the group. In this way justice benefits the individual and society.

Psychiatry’s attempt to eradicate the concept of right and wrong and thereby destroy personal responsibility by inventing excuses for the most flagrant misconduct, undermines the justice system.

Recommendations

1. First and foremost it should be recognized that every person is responsible for his or her own actions and must be held accountable for their actions.

2. State and federal legislators should repeal any laws permitting the insanity defense and diminished capacity pleas.

3. Judges, attorneys and law enforcement officers need to ensure that psychiatric evidence is removed from the courts and that psychiatrists and psychologists are no longer afforded “expert” status.

4. Remove psychiatrists and psychologists as advisors or as counselors from police forces, prisons and criminal rehabilitation and parole services. Because psychiatrists have no scientific foundation for their claims, do not permit them to render opinions about or to treat drug addiction, criminal behavior and delinquency, or to probe for alleged dangerous behavior.

5. Prosecute as a criminal offense any and all cases of physical damage caused through psychiatry’s use of electroshock, brain surgery or abusive drug “treatment.”

For more information and the full history of psychiatry’s corruption of justice, download and read the CCHR bookletEroding Justice – Psychiatry’s Corruption of Law – Report and recommendations on psychiatry subverting the courts and corrective services“.

Missouri Settlement Changes Psychiatric Drug Use in Foster Kids

A class action federal lawsuit [Case No. 2:17-cv-04102-NKL] against the Missouri Department of Social Services alleging the overdrugging of foster children with harmful and addictive psychotropic drugs was given preliminary approval for settlement by U.S. District Court Judge Nanette Laughrey (Western District of Missouri) on Monday, July 15, 2019.

The case was first filed in June 2017 by national non-profit organizations Children’s Rights and the National Center for Youth Law (NCYL), the Saint Louis University School of Law Legal Clinics, and pro-bono counsel Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP.

The lawsuit claimed that children in Missouri foster care are at increased risk of being improperly or unnecessarily administered psychotropic drugs, leaving the children vulnerable to various serious adverse effects, including hallucinations, self-harm and suicidal thoughts.

Roughly 13,000 children are in Missouri’s foster care system. More than 30% of them are prescribed these harmful drugs, and 20% are taking two or more drugs at the same time. Medicaid pays for a majority of the healthcare services that children in foster care receive, including psychotropic drugs.

Most psychotropic drugs have not been FDA approved to treat children, who are at great risk of serious harm from these drugs because the drugs play Russian Roulette with neurotransmitters in the brain.

The settlement calls for multiple reforms, although without any of the defendants admitting any liability concerning any of the claims or allegations in the complaint. Objections, support, or comments by Class members or their legal representatives (or other interested parties) can be provided by October 23, 2019 per the “Notice of Proposed Class Action Settlement in M.B., et al. v. Tidball, et al.

The Missouri Department of Social Services, on behalf of the Missouri Children’s Division of the Department of Social Services, has contracted with the University of Missouri-Columbia to constitute a Center for Excellence within its Department of Psychiatry to undertake various responsibilities regarding this settlement, for roughly $3.8 million through July 31, 2021, although this contract is not specifically part of the settlement. While we applaud the Missouri government for taking action to address the abuse of foster children in their care, we must note that having psychiatrists oversee psychiatric abuse is like putting the fox in charge of the henhouse.

Specific commitments of the settlement include (these provisions are only briefly summarized here; refer to the actual settlement for full details):
1. Children’s Division (CD) shall maintain a full-time employee responsible for overseeing the implementation of policies and procedures concerning the use of psychotropic drugs for children in CD foster care.
2. Provisions for CD Case Management Staff Training.
3. Provisions for Resource Provider Training.
4. Provisions for training in the child welfare community serving children in Missouri.
5. CD shall maintain sufficient Case Management Staff to perform functions of the agreement.
6. Every child shall have a mental health assessment prior to being prescribed a psychotropic drug.
7. Every child prescribed a psychotropic drug shall have medical examinations.
8. Every child prescribed a psychotropic drug for ongoing use shall have monitoring appointments.
9. Every child prescribed a psychotropic drug shall receive concurrent nonpharmacological treatment.
10. Defendants are committed to developing and operating one or more statewide systems for maintaining medical records and/or medical information of each child in the custody of CD.
11. Defendants are committed to developing and operating one or more systems whereby pertinent medical records and/or medical information of the child will be made available to appropriate members of the child’s treatment team.
12. CD will implement and maintain a system for conducting secondary reviews of prescriptions of psychotropic drugs prescribed to children in the legal custody of CD.
13. CD shall maintain a policy governing informed consent and informed assent for psychotropic drugs, including a process for parental disagreement. The difference between consent and assent is basically that consent comes from the case manager and assent comes from the child.
14. Provisions for emergency administration of psychotropic drugs.
15.Defendants will appoint and maintain a psychotropic drug Advisory Committee to provide professional and technical consultation and policy advice.
16. Provisions for excessive dosage guidelines.

There are other provisions for data validation, enforcement, reporting, and exit criteria from the agreement. Refer to the actual agreement for these details.

Go here for more information about psychiatric abuse in the foster care system.

More About Psychiatric Drugs Causing Violence and Suicide

Reference:

Antidepressant-induced akathisia-related homicides associated with diminishing mutations in metabolizing genes of the CYP450 family
by Yolande Lucire and Christopher Crotty
Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine, 1 August 2011
[doi: 10.2147/PGPM.S17445]

This research paper details patients who had been referred to Dr. Lucire’s practice for expert opinion or treatment. More than 120 subjects were diagnosed with akathisia [a neurotoxic psychosis often characterized by a feeling of inner restlessness and inability to stay still] or serotonin toxicity [extremely high levels of serotonin causing toxic and potentially fatal effects] after taking psychiatric drugs that had been prescribed for psychosocial distress. Akathisia has been known to be associated with suicide since the 1950s and with homicide since 1985.

They were tested for variant alleles in cytochrome P450 (CYP450) genes, which play a major role in the metabolism of all antidepressant and many other drugs, indicating ultrarapid metabolism due to allele duplications. This seems to be strongly associated with a large number of deaths from intoxication and suicide. High or fast-changing levels of psychotropic substances can cause unpredictable toxicity leading to violent behavioral effects, including akathisia. [An allele is one of two or more alternative forms of a gene that arise by mutation and are found at the same place on a chromosome.]

Psychiatric drugs are metabolized in the liver by cytochrome P450 enzymes in order to be eliminated from the body. Abnormal CYP450 metabolism, either ultrarapid and/or diminished, can lead to the drug or its metabolites reaching a toxic level in hours or days, correlating with the onset of intense dysphoria [unease or generalized dissatisfaction with life] and akathisia. A person genetically deficient in these enzymes, or who has an ultrarapid drug metabolism, or who is taking other (legal or illegal) drugs that diminish CYP450 enzyme activity, is at risk of a toxic accumulation of the drug leading to more severe side effects.

Eight of these cases had committed homicide and many more became extremely violent or suicidal while on antidepressants. Ten representative case histories involving serious violence are presented in great detail in the paper. None of the ten subjects described had any history of mental illness; none had been violent before. All recovered from akathisia after stopping the medication without assistance or supervision and, frequently, against medical advice.

Akathisia suicides and homicides, particularly when they involved children, gave rise to the first antidepressant suicide advisories by the FDA in 2004.

Personal, medical, and legal problems can arise from using psychiatric drugs and experiencing the resulting toxicity from these metabolic effects. The results presented in this paper demonstrate the grave extent to which the psychiatric industry has expanded its influence beyond its ability to cure.

As the authors state, “In all of the cases presented here, the subjects were prescribed antidepressants that failed to mitigate distress emerging from their predicaments, which encompassed psychosocial stressors such as bereavement, marital and relationship difficulties, and work-related stress. Every subject’s emotional reaction worsened while their prescribing physicians continued the “trial and error” approach, increasing from standard to higher dose and/or switching to other antidepressants, with disastrous consequences. In some cases the violence ensued from changes occasioned by withdrawal and polypharmacy. In all of these cases, the subjects were put into a state of drug-induced toxicity manifesting as akathisia, which resolved only upon discontinuation of the antidepressant drugs.”

“It is the authors’ contention that prescribing antidepressants without knowing about CYP450 genotypes is like giving blood transfusions without matching for ABO groups [the classification of human blood].”

In general, the psychiatric industry pushes psychotropic drugs without regard to these CYP450 cautions, but this is the direct result of the unscientific psychiatric diagnoses perpetrated by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) which fraudulently justifies prescribing these harmful drugs for profit in the first place.

Recommendations

1. Practice Full Informed Consent by asking your doctor for information about possible side effects and benefits, ways to treat side effects, and risks of other conditions, as well as information about alternative treatments.

2. If your doctor diagnoses a mental disorder and prescribes a psychiatric drug, ask to see the clinical lab tests proving the diagnosis. (There won’t be any.)

3. All treatment options should include checking for real underlying medical conditions that could cause a patient’s mental or emotional duress.

4. Write your state and federal legislators to establish rights for patients and their insurance companies to receive refunds for mental health treatment which did not achieve the promised result or improvement, or which resulted in proven harm to the individual, thereby ensuring that responsibility lies with the individual practitioner and psychiatric facility rather than the government or its agencies.

5. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), psychiatry’s billing manual for mental disorders, is the key to false escalating mental illness statistics and psychiatric drug prescriptions and usage worldwide. Untold harm and colossal waste of mental health funds occur because of it. It is imperative that the DSM diagnostic system be abandoned before real mental health reform can occur.

6. Patients, doctors and insurance companies should report all instances of adverse side effects from psychiatric drugs to the FDA.

7. The pernicious influence of psychiatry has wreaked havoc throughout society, especially in hospitals, educational systems and prisons. Citizens groups and responsible government officials should work together to expose and abolish psychiatry’s hidden manipulation of society for profit.

They say TD is Manageable; They Lie

A recent spate of TV ads points to a new public relations campaign by the psychopharmaceutical mental health industry masquerading as a public service in an attempt to downplay the disastrous side effects of psychiatric drugs.

The tag line is “TD is Manageable“; TD being Tardive Dyskinesia [tardive, “late appearing” and dyskinesia, “abnormal muscle movement”], in which the muscles of the face and body contort and spasm involuntarily.

It has been known for a long time that the use of antipsychotics and other psychiatric drugs, prescribed for so-called schizophrenia and other fraudulent psychiatric diagnoses, may lead to tardive dyskinesia which causes random muscle movements that a person can’t control, and in some cases are permanent and cannot be cured.

Some research has also shown that TD may precipitate cognitive impairment.

On Feb. 11, 2014, a Chicago jury awarded $1.5 million to an autistic child who developed a severe case of irreversible tardive dyskinesia while being treated by psychiatrists with Risperdal and then Zyprexa between 2002 and 2007.

Since there is no known cure for TD, this public relations campaign is designed to make people feel that it isn’t so bad after all when the body jerks around for no reason. The best they can suggest is to talk to your doctor about it, reduce stress, and oh! by the way! you can also take this new psychiatric drug Ingrezza (generic valbenazine).

So, we finally see that this PR campaign is not really a public service, it’s about selling more psychiatric drugs.

Ingrezza from Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc. is believed to reduce dopamine release in the brain (they don’t really know how it “works”.)

The body must strictly regulate dopamine levels since both an excess and a deficiency can be problematic. Drugs which mess with dopamine play Russian roulette with your brain. And of course this drug has the usual range of adverse reactions, including akathisia (a movement disorder that makes it hard to stay still) which is just another form of TD.

The only real way to “manage” TD is not to get it in the first place by not taking any psychiatric drugs. Recognize that the real problem is that psychiatrists fraudulently diagnose life’s problems as an “illness”, and stigmatize unwanted behavior as “diseases,” so that they can make a buck selling drugs whose side effects make you a patient for life. Psychiatry’s stigmatizing labels, programs and treatments are harmful junk science; their diagnoses of “mental disorders” are a hoax — unscientific, fraudulent and harmful.

Cratered by Kratom

Kratom is an increasingly popular drug of abuse and readily available on the “recreational” drug market. Between 3 million and 5 million people in the U.S. use kratom, and reported poisonings from people taking it have soared.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has warned against using Mitragyna Speciosa, commonly known as kratom, a tree in the coffee family which grows naturally in Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, Philippines, Vietnam, Myanmar, and Papua New Guinea. The concern is that kratom leaves, which affect the same opioid brain receptors as morphine, appear to have properties that expose users to the risks of addiction, abuse, and dependence.

There are no FDA-approved uses for kratom because there is no scientific evidence to support its medical use, and the FDA urges consumers to report any adverse reactions to the FDA’s MedWatch program.

The race is on to get patents for synthetics and derivatives of Mitragyna Speciosa. Doctors and mental health workers need to be aware of the psychopathological effects of these substances.

Because kratom is still legal in the U.S., it has become a go-to drug for individuals with chronic pain, promoted anecdotally by some psychiatrists both to mitigate pain and to ease withdrawal from other opioids.

Some other psychiatrists are convinced of kratom’s mental health benefits as a potential therapeutic agent.

Here again we see psychiatry, with its long history of harmful drug pushing, justifying and promoting the latest in a long line of such harmful, addictive and psychedelic drugs.

Similar to the dose-dependent characteristics of any drug, in relatively small amounts kratom acts as a stimulant; in relatively larger amounts it causes sedation; and when overdosed it can cause death.

Kratom’s psychoactive compounds, mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine, are opioid-receptor agonists, which means they are chemicals that bind to the same receptors in the brain to which opioids bind, thus acting in the brain similar to other opioids like morphine and codeine.

Side effects of taking (or withdrawing from) kratom may include dependence, nausea, vomiting, aggression, hallucinations, delusions, psychosis, seizures, thyroid problems, increased risk of suicide, trouble breathing, brain swelling, seizures, liver damage, or death.

In spite of the American Kratom Association’s lobbying efforts to promote this harmful substance, and its repeated references to the American Psychiatric Association for support, we find that there is sufficient reason to be highly skeptical.

Click here for more information about kratom.

Psychiatric Inpatients Have Elevated Risks for Adverse Reactions

[Reference: “Multiple adverse outcomes following first discharge from inpatient psychiatric care: a national cohort study”, The Lancet Psychiatry, June 03, 2019]

People discharged from inpatient psychiatric care are at higher risk than the rest of the population for a range of serious fatal and non-fatal adverse outcomes.

These individuals are also more likely to perpetrate violent crimes, including homicide. Suicide risk is known to be especially raised soon after discharge.

Results were summarized from 62,922 Danish people who had been discharged from inpatient psychiatric services and 1,573,050 who had never been a psychiatric inpatient, examining these adverse outcomes over ten years post-discharge: mortality, suicide, accidental death, homicide victimization, homicide perpetration, non-fatal self-harm, violent criminality, and hospitalization following violence.

The risk of at least one of these adverse outcomes was highest in people using psychoactive drugs.

Although no detailed clinical information was available regarding what psychiatric treatments were given, it can be assumed that psychiatric (psychoactive) drugs were a major part of most treatments, since worldwide statistics show that a rapidly increasing percentage of every age group, from children to the elderly, rely heavily and routinely on psychiatric drugs in their daily lives. Worldwide sales of antidepressants, for example, were more than $14 billion in 2017, and expected to surpass $15 billion by 2023.

These statistics give one more result in a long line of significant research that concludes:

  • psychiatry cannot cure any so-called mental illness
  • psychiatric treatments cause violence and suicide
  • psychiatric treatments actually harm rather than help vulnerable people
  • psychiatry is junk science
  • psychiatric drugs can only chemically mask problems and symptoms; they cannot and never will be able to solve problems

People in desperate circumstances must be provided proper and effective medical care. Medical, not psychiatric, attention, good nutrition, a healthy, safe environment and activity that promotes confidence will do far more than the brutality of psychiatry’s treatments.

While life is full of problems, and sometimes those problems can be overwhelming, it is important for you to know that psychiatry, its diagnoses and its drugs are the wrong way to go.

The Psychiatric Opioid Connection

Current media abounds about the opioid addiction and overdose crisis, and often points to the Sackler brothers of Purdue Pharma as major enablers of this horrific epidemic.

Rarely, however, does the media point out that Arthur, Mortimer and Raymond Sackler, pushing OxyContin for profit, were each practicing psychiatrists.

Psychiatrists have a history of pushing addictive drugs as “treatments.” LSD, heroin, psilocybin, mescaline, peyote, cannabis, ecstacy, and other hallucinogens have all been pushed by various psychiatrists as treatments for mental symptoms. Today, drug regulatory agencies all over the world approve clinical trials for the use of hallucinogenic drugs to handle anything from anxiety to alcoholism, despite the drugs being known to cause psychosis.

Now that psychiatrists have been exposed as perpetrators of drug addiction, we find that the opioid crisis has been claimed by the psychiatric industry as a behavioral health problem, because psychiatry claims that addiction is now a mental illness. Unfortunately there is no science to support this.

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) and the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10) euphemistically call addiction a “use disorder.” To cement its control of addiction “treatments”, the DSM lists hundreds of “use disorders” for a wide range of substances (alcohol, amphetamines, caffeine, cannabis, cocaine, inhalants, opioids, hallucinogens, phencyclidines, sedatives, hypnotics, anxiolytics, stimulants, tobacco, and other, unknown, or unspecified substances or stimulants.) Not to mention other types of impulsive or compulsive behaviors such as anorexia, gambling, gaming, pyromania, kleptomania and promiscuity.

Then, to confuse the situation even more, psychiatrists recommend treating drug addictions with more addictive drugs; this is called “medication-assisted treatment,” an increasingly influential and controversial paradigm in the world of medicine that, among other things, considers addiction a chronic “brain disease” treated by more drugs, rather than a condition that can be treated by addressing the social and spiritual aspects underlying addiction.

The late Professor Thomas Szasz said, “If we recognize that ‘mental illness’ is a metaphor for disapproved thoughts, feelings, and behaviors, we are compelled to recognize as well that the primary function of Psychiatry is to control thought, mood, and behavior.” Coercive psychiatry is not about curing mental disorders; it’s about controlling behavior and “we know best what’s good for you.”

By the way, you can also become addicted to common psychiatric drugs such as antidepressants, psychostimulants, anti-anxiety drugs, and barbiturates. Addictive drugs should never be discontinued abruptly, since the withdrawal side effects can be severe. For more information about how to safely withdraw from these harmful and addictive drugs, download and read the booklet Coming Off Psych Drugs Harm Reduction Guide.

Psychiatrists Anxious to Treat All Child-bearing Women for Post-Partum Depression

The FDA approved the first drug treatment for post-partum depression (PPD) on March 19, 2019. Psychiatrists call this “peripartum depression”, which means depressive symptoms during pregnancy or after childbirth. While there is no  actual diagnostic test for this, the current revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V) labels this with various alternative wordings of “depressive disorder” or “bipolar disorder” or “anxiety disorder” or “stress disorder,” sometimes with the specifier “with peripartum onset“, depending on the circumstances.

The diagnosis is totally subjective, and is a justification for making money for prescribing an antidepressant. Psychiatrists do not typically perform any clinical tests to find out if there is a real medical reason for the symptoms, such as thyroid problems or vitamin deficiencies. Research suggests that rapid changes in hormones and thyroid levels during and after delivery have a strong effect on moods, yet this is mostly ignored by the psychiatric industry since it is easier and more profitable to prescribe a psychotropic drug.

The drug is Zulresso (generic brexanolone), an intravenous infusion administered continuously over 60 hours (2.5 days) and requiring constant monitoring. There is a risk of serious harm due to a sudden loss of consciousness during the treatment, the appearance of suicidal thoughts and behaviors, or hypoxia (loss of oxygen in the blood). The drug passes into breast milk, but there is no data on the safety of brexanolone while breastfeeding. The cost has currently been set at $34,000 per course of treatment.

Sage Therapeutics says that this neurosteroid, a derivative of allopregnanolone, affects GABAA (Type-A gamma-Aminobutyric acid) neurotransmitter receptors in the brain, although the actual mechanism of action of this drug with respect to PPD (or any other condition) is unknown.

Many people think that post-partum depression is a mental illness. However, this is very misleading for a mother who has experienced the trauma of just giving birth. To have them think the emotional roller coaster they may be experiencing is the result of a “chemical imbalance in the brain,” requiring mind-altering medication, is false and potentially very harmful.

This does not mean that serious emotional difficulties do not exist. But it does mean that psychiatrists and psychologists have used such difficulties to their advantage, promoting powerful drugs as a “solution” for vulnerable individuals. This has been for the sake of profit, often at the expense of people’s lives.

Quite apart from such drugs causing harm, they are also unnecessary. Any competent medical doctor who takes the time to conduct a thorough physical examination of someone exhibiting signs of what psychiatrists say are “mental disorders,” including post-partum depression, can find undiagnosed, untreated physical conditions.

Instead, psychiatrists prefer to tell young mothers that their condition is an “illness,” requiring “medication,” potentially endangering the life of the mother and her child.

Women may experience drastic drops in hormone levels after the birth of a child that can deliver a major shock to the woman’s body. Nutritional and mineral depletion or deficiencies as well as a lack of sleep while caring for a baby can also cause the symptoms psychiatrists say are a “mental disorder.” It can be treated nutritionally.

For more information, download and read the CCHR bookletThe Drugging of ‘Post Partum Depression’ – Clearing up Misconceptions About ‘Chemical Imbalances,’ Antidepressant Drugs and Non-Drug Solutions“.