Posts Tagged ‘Mental Health’

The Cloward-Piven Strategy

Wednesday, December 10th, 2014

The Cloward-Piven Strategy

The Cloward–Piven strategy is a political strategy outlined in 1966 by American sociologists and political activists Richard Cloward and Frances Fox Piven that called for overloading the U.S. public welfare system in order to precipitate a crisis that would lead to a replacement of the welfare system with a national system of a guaranteed annual income and thus “an end to poverty.”

[Cloward, Richard; Piven, Frances (May 2, 1966). “The Weight of the Poor: A Strategy to End Poverty”. (Originally published in The Nation)]

You heard that right. The idea is to drastically increase the ranks of people on government welfare, crash the welfare system and force it to be replaced by — another government welfare system for everyone.

As Cloward and Piven put it, the ultimate objective of this strategy is to wipe out poverty by establishing a guaranteed annual income. In order to precipitate this crisis, the poor must obtain more and more welfare benefits until the system is overloaded.

This is just another suppressive way of redistributing income through the federal government.

Another part of the strategy is that welfare advocacy “must be supplemented by organized demonstrations to create a climate of militancy that will overcome the invidious and immobilizing attitudes which many potential recipients hold toward being ‘on welfare.'”

In other words, let’s create a dangerous environment so that people lose their natural inclination to be self-sufficient and hook them on government welfare.

“To generate an expressly political movement, cadres of aggressive organizers would have to come from the civil rights movement and the churches, …” Are you starting to see a pattern here with recent riots and demonstrations, largely fomented by people sent in from outside the affected community?

They go on to say, “By crisis, we mean a publicly visible disruption in some institutional sphere. Crisis can occur spontaneously (e.g., riots) or as the intended result of tactics of demonstration and protest which either generate institutional disruption or bring unrecognized disruption to public attention.”

Are you getting it yet? Do we really need to name Ferguson? Roughly a quarter of those rioters arrested were not residents of Missouri. One report has it that, “The real story out of Ferguson is that a national network of agitators is ready, on a moment’s notice, to arrive on the scene to cause violence and mayhem.”

Do you know how much “mental health care” and psychiatric drugs are a part of this plot, given that these drugs incite violence and aggression as a “side effect?” Hint — the Missouri Department of Mental Health’s budget is over $1.8 billion per year. Medicaid claims for psychotropic drugs are well over 60 million per year, over 2 million claims per year in Missouri; Medicaid payments for psychotropic drugs are over $6 billion per year, and over $174 million per year in Missouri.

Missouri Medicaid (called MO HealthNet) covers 1 out of every 7 Missourians and 38% of Missouri’s children. Roughly 30% of Missouri’s total annual budget goes to Medicaid; but this only covers 50% of Medicaid spending — the other 50% comes from the federal government. 15% of the Medicaid budget goes to pharmacy services; 15% goes to mental health services. And of course the Affordable Care Act allows for the expansion of eligibility for Medicaid — a key part of Cloward-Piven, expanding access to welfare; although at this time Missouri has not yet expanded MO HealthNet eligibility.

Psychotropic drugs represent roughly 30% of all pharmaceutical spending, and the cost appears to increase roughly 20% per year.

The implementation of the Affordable Care Act is expected to add 2.7 percent, or $7.3 billion, to the level of Mental Health and Substance Abuse spending in 2020, as an expected 25 million people who were previously uninsured gain health insurance coverage.

Well, as we looked back on these statistics, we nearly fell off of our soapbox in shock. What to do? Contact your local, state and federal officials and express your alarm. Write a Letter to the Editor. Contact your employer, your school, your church, your family, friends, and associates. Show them a CCHR DVD documentary (we’ll mail you one if you promise to show it around.) Forward this newsletter and suggest they subscribe. Vote!

Find Out! Fight Back!

Ferguson and Human Rights

Saturday, December 6th, 2014

Ferguson and Human Rights

Most people have never heard of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in 1948. And almost no one can name more than a few of the 30 rights it includes — if they even know what “human rights” are.

Yet the protection of individual rights is vital to the stability of communities and the very survival of our culture. Education at all levels is the solution.

If you are an educator or civil rights activist, order your free Bring Human Rights to Life information kit from United For Human Rights here: http://www.humanrights.com/freeinfo.html

Human: noun
A member of the Homo sapiens species; a man, woman or child; a person.

Rights: noun
Things to which you are entitled or allowed; freedoms that are guaranteed.

Human Rights: noun
The rights you have simply because you are human.

Human rights are based on the principle of respect for the individual. Their fundamental assumption is that each person is a moral and rational being who deserves to be treated with dignity. They are called human rights because they are universal. Whereas nations or specialized groups enjoy specific rights that apply only to them, human rights are the rights to which everyone is entitled—no matter who they are or where they live—simply because they are alive.

Article 1. All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.

Article 3. Everyone has the right to life, liberty and security of person.

Article 7. All are equal before the law and are entitled without any discrimination to equal protection of the law.

Article 8. Everyone has the right to an effective remedy by the competent national tribunals for acts violating the fundamental rights granted him by the constitution or by law.

There are a lot more rights; Read the full text of the U.N. Universal Declaration of Human Rights here.

In seeking justice for perceived wrong-doings, look to which rights have been violated. Educate yourself and others about these rights.

Make your voice heard. Make human rights education in schools and universities part of the curriculum. You can help ensure human rights are learned and demanded by everyone by signing this petition.

Do you want to take an active role in initiating activities and forwarding the cause of human rights in your community? The most effective thing you can do is start a group!

Following the initial Ferguson protests, Amnesty International USA sent a delegation to Ferguson from Aug. 14-22. This briefing document outlines some of the human rights concerns witnessed by Amnesty International and a series of recommendations that need to be implemented with regards to the use of lethal force by law enforcement officers and the policing of protests.

The City of Ferguson Human Rights Commission hears complaints related to human rights violations and advises the City Council on possible legislative or policy changes to prevent discrimination. [Pam Hylton, Assistant City Manager, 314-524-5158.]

Be aware that every mental health group in the area, and indeed in the country, is going to be offering “support and counseling” to Ferguson residents for their “anger and grief.” Since we already know that the psychiatric and psychological mental health care industry is an affront to human rights, special care is needed to avoid getting sucked into the mental health treatment mill.

Through CCHR’s diligence, thousands of victims of psychiatric human rights abuse have been rescued; patients have regained their legal and civil rights; mental health acts around the world have prohibited the arbitrary use of electroshock treatment and psychosurgery.

However, psychiatrists’ power to coerce patients into putting themselves and their children on very dangerous psychotropic drugs condemns us all to a deepening drug culture and the subversion of the family unit. Seventeen million children worldwide are prescribed antidepressants that cause violent and suicidal behavior. Millions more of our young are prescribed stimulants that are more potent than cocaine.

By depicting those they label mentally ill as a danger to themselves or others, psychiatrists have convinced governments and courts that depriving such individuals of their liberty is mandatory for the safety of all concerned. Wherever psychiatry has succeeded in this campaign, extreme abuses of human rights have resulted.

The right to have a thorough, physical and clinical examination by a competent registered general practitioner of one’s choice, to ensure that one’s mental condition is not caused by any undetected and untreated physical illness, injury or defect, and the right to seek a second medical opinion of one’s choice, is provided for in CCHR’s Declaration of Mental Health Rights.

For more information about psychiatric violations of human rights, download and read this free CCHR publication: Citizens Commission on Human Rights – The International Mental Health Watchdog.

Ferguson Missouri Mental Health Tips

Wednesday, December 3rd, 2014

Ferguson Missouri Mental Health Tips

It seems that nearly everyone – newspapers, radio, TV, bloggers, tweeters, facebookers – has been proclaiming about events in Ferguson, Missouri.

Not to be left out, we thought we would find some way to relate these events to the CCHR mission of exposing psychiatric abuse of human rights.

Find it we did, on a website called twitchy.com: “For those feeling stressed over the situation in Ferguson, Mo., State Senator Maria Chappelle-Nadal has shared some tips for anyone suffering from Ferguson-related Post Traumatic Stress Disorder: ‘Get outside’ may or may not be the best advice at certain times.” While this comes across as a joke (apparently the Senator tweeted her advice [@MariaChappelleN]), it is no joke that the Senator is pushing psychiatric mental health care on the community.

Apparently, the Senator has been outspoken about citizens in Ferguson suffering from PTSD as a result of the Michael Brown shooting in August. She’s quoted here on CBS news: “What should have happened since day one is we should have had counselors out in the streets and psychologists because this community is experiencing PTSD right now and frankly, I think some officers are, too.”

This only serves to punch up the observation that PTSD has become blurred as a catch-all diagnosis for some 175 combinations of symptoms, becoming the label for identifying the impact of adverse events on ordinary people. This means that normal responses to catastrophic events have often been interpreted as mental disorders, “treatable” with psychotropic drugs.

Expect the entire mental health care industry to jump on this bandwagon, much as Paul Gionfriddo, President/CEO of Mental Health America, has done when he said, “We can give people in affected neighborhoods access to relief services and mental health professionals to help them work through their feelings and concerns. … We can give them screening tools to monitor their mental health.”

They are even suggesting that the black community needs mental health care more than the white community, as if racial tensions are not high enough: “The Affordable Care Act has improved access to mental healthcare services for many Americans but surprisingly, the demand remains much lower than the supply, especially in racial & ethnic minority groups. African American and Hispanic Americans use mental health services at about one-half the rate of their Caucasian counterparts.”

Let’s not leave out the Missouri Department of Mental Health, jumping into the fray with both its feet with a Ferguson web page devoted to “Tips for Talking With and Helping Children and Youth Cope After a Disaster or Traumatic Event.”

Many people are not only convinced that the environment is dangerous, but that it is steadily growing more so. The fact of the matter is, however, that the environment is made to appear much more dangerous than it actually is. A great number of people are professional dangerous environment makers. This includes professions which require a dangerous environment for their existence such as the psychiatric mental health industry. They need a dangerous environment to convince people to buy their drugs and other treatments.

The psychiatric propaganda machine is working hard to convince everyone to buy their lies, particularly those vulnerable people most in need of workable help. Are you going to let them continue to promote how dangerous it is to live in Ferguson? Are you going to let them move in on Ferguson and other suffering communities with their harmful and addictive psychotropic drugs? Or are you going to do something about it? Contact your local, state and federal officials and express your opinion. Become a member of CCHR STL so that we can spread this word.

The mental health monopoly has practically zero accountability and zero liability for its failures. Psychiatry has never cured anything. Instead, as a consequence of its extensive use of dangerous drugs, it has created most of the mental ill health that it claims it can treat. No one can deny that many children and other individuals today are faced with very real problems. But to propagandize that they are a widespread mental disease when there is no scientific evidence substantiating this, is fraudulent.

Find Out! Fight Back!

Typical or Troubled? School Mental Health Education Program

Sunday, October 26th, 2014

Typical or Troubled?

School Mental Health Education Program

The American Psychiatric Foundation (APF), the philanthropic and educational arm of the American Psychiatric Association (APA), provides grants to fund the implementation of the Typical or Troubled?™ mental health education program in schools throughout the United States. Contributors to the funding include Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson and Shire Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

They say that the curriculum has been presented so far in 2,000 schools. It is available in English and Spanish; it includes APA mental health disinformation and role-playing exercises — pushing the typical psychiatric misinformation about warning signs, mental disorders, treatments, and referrals for mental health treatment. One of its aims, of course, is connecting teens to “treatment.”

The “educational” program spouts the fraudulent psychiatric party line: “1 in 5 children has a mental health disorder;” “1 in 10 kids have ADHD;” and a dissection of the “teen brain” that looks like this:

Close to home, this program has been done in the Rockwood School District (Eureka, Missouri).

If you have young children or teens in school, you might want to check if this program is in your school and pull your children out of the program. Contact your school Board of Education, your state Board of Education, your Parent-Teacher organization, your school administrators and counselors, and let them know what you think about this.

We think this is just another way to get away with mental health screening in schools, and get more kids onto psychiatric drugs.

Mental health screening aims to get whole populations on drugs and thus under control. The kinds of drugs used create further medical and social problems, and these subsequent complications require additional taxes and laws to handle them. The net result is a sick and fearful population dependent on the government to “solve” all their problems.

Recognize that the real problem is that psychiatrists fraudulently diagnose life’s problems as an “illness”, and stigmatize unwanted behavior or study problems as “diseases.” Psychiatry’s stigmatizing labels, programs and treatments are harmful junk science; their diagnoses of “mental disorders” are a hoax – unscientific, fraudulent and harmful. All psychiatric treatments, not just psychiatric drugs, are dangerous, and can cause crime.

Psychiatrists, psychologists, psychotherapists, psychiatric institutions, and other medical doctors prescribing psychiatric drugs and treatments must be made fully accountable for their funding, practices and treatments, and their results, or lack thereof — including prescribing antidepressants whose only results are harmful side effects.

Click here for more information about mental health screening.

Crisis Intervention Teams and your mental health

Sunday, October 19th, 2014

Crisis Intervention Teams and your mental health

You may or may not be aware of a police function called a “Crisis Intervention Team” (CIT). There is a heavy ongoing push country-wide to train police officers to “handle” difficult situations involving “suspected mental illness.”

For example, someone calls 911 to report a domestic squabble. The police arrive. Tempers flair. Someone is going to be taken to a mental health facility for a “96-hour evaluation,” also called Involuntary Commitment or Civil Commitment.

Let us use the Saint Louis County Police CIT as an example, whose mission is “to deliver positive law enforcement crisis intervention service to people with mental illness in the St. Louis area.”

The CIT-trained officers are used primarily as a referral mechanism to local mental health hospitals and agencies. If they cannot defuse a potentially dangerous situation, they will forcibly transport the offending person to a local hospital emergency room and transfer the person into the mental health system, authorized by Missouri Statute 632.305 (“Detention for evaluation and treatment”.)

The CIT engages local hospitals, agencies and organizations in a cooperative effort (“community partnership”) to streamline this process. One of the primary goals of a CIT is to divert offenders from jail to the mental health system, reducing the burden on the criminal justice system.

In the St. Louis area, there are 20 cooperating mental health agencies, 9 cooperating hospital systems, and 58 local law enforcement agencies with CIT-trained personnel. There are 10 counties throughout Missouri with CIT programs.

In 1988, the Memphis Police Department joined in partnership with the Memphis Chapter of the Alliance for the Mentally Ill, mental health providers, and two local universities (the University of Memphis and the University of Tennessee) in organizing, training, and implementing a specialized unit for handling mental crisis events. This became the model Crisis Intervention Team subsequently exported to police departments across the country.

To be sure, no one disputes the need for police training, the safe and effective handling of potentially dangerous situations, and the temporary care for persons in crisis mode. One does, however, question the efficacy of mental health “treatment” in the current model of the psychiatric mental health system, where “treatment” generally means one or more abusive practices such as involuntary commitment, harmful and addictive psychotropic drugs, patient restraints, electroshock, and psycho-surgery.

Your mental health, and the mental health of your family, friends and associates, can be questioned by CIT-trained police. If this makes you uncomfortable, execute a Living Will (Letter of Protection from Psychiatric Incarceration and/or Treatment) and then express your opinion to your local, state and federal officials, and email the St. Louis Area Crisis Intervention Team Coordinating Council.

Behavioral Health in St. Louis

Monday, September 1st, 2014

Behavioral Health

It used to be called “mental health.”

The so-called “stigma” of mental health now prompts a name change, and they are starting to call it “behavioral health,” which just means how effectively one handles stress.

There isn’t any stigma, of course. Stigma is manufactured by the psycho-pharmaceutical industry so that there is a bad-sounding social issue for which research funds can be solicited and psychotropic drugs sold to unsuspecting victims, and for which reports can be written about how bad it all is.

We call it propaganda by redefinition of words, which is a way to mold public opinion by altering words to obtain a public relations advantage.

Behavior: The way in which one acts or conducts oneself, especially toward others, or in response to a particular situation [late Middle English from be-have in the sense of “have or bear (oneself) in a particular way”.]

The implication is that “behavior” is troublesome and must be corrected; one’s behavioral health, then, is amiss, requiring psychiatric treatment.

A primary strategy of behavioral health is the extension of services into the community — at home, school, workplace and other community settings.

Recently, the “crisis in Ferguson, Missouri” is a field day for behavioral health therapists. Misbehaving people (whether the police or the populace, take your pick) are thus desperately in need of treatment; and the stress of dealing with this misbehavior for the rest of us means we also need some “behavioral health” treatments.

One truly hopes you recognize tongue firmly in cheek here.

Misconduct or misbehavior exhibit a lack of environmental control by all parties concerned. Such control begins with the individual managing and controlling his own environment — his person, his things, his behavior. We usually just call this “competence.” When a group messes up to such an extent as witnessed in Ferguson, look to the sanity of their leaders, who have allowed those under their care to deteriorate to such an extent that they can no longer handle the stress of their environment.

Unfortunately, psychiatry does not have an answer here other than more drugs, further suppressing one’s ability to deal with stress in their environment.

What is the proper response? Put order into the environment. Locate and handle the insane ones who are provoking the stress, or just letting it happen. Locate and handle those pushing psychiatric solutions, such as the “behavioral health” people at local hospitals and universities who promote electro-convulsive therapy as a solution to behavior.

The Saint Louis Mental Health Board is a special tax district in the City of St. Louis as set forth by state statute, and consider themselves the mental health authority for the City of St. Louis, funding 48 different agencies with community programs, community projects, community partnerships and other initiatives that are supposed to help residents improve their behavioral health. Since their inception in 1992 they have proudly spent $111,769,998 on such programs. They financially support the publication of the Vision for Children at Risk “Children of Metropolitan St. Louis” report, which gathers statistics on 28 indicators of well-being for children under 18 by zip code; the primary zip code for Ferguson is 63135, in case you would like to review it.

Gee whiz, our children need a lot of behavioral health help!

Is it working?

Doesn’t appear to be.

But they sure know how to write reports!

Your task is to contact your local, state and federal officials and representatives, and let them know what you think about this. Provide your personal observations and experiences. Suggest that they stop funding failed psychiatric treatments, mental health programs, and behavioral health community initiatives — and do something effective, like teaching children to read.

California Medical Evaluation Field Manual

Sunday, August 17th, 2014

California Medical Evaluation Field Manual

In 1991, Dr. Lorrin M. Koran prepared the Medical Evaluation Field Manual at the request of the California legislature.

Quoting from the Introduction:


“This Field Manual shows California mental health program administrators and staff how to screen their patients for active, important physical diseases. The Manual explains how, where, and when to screen, how to initiate and staff a screening program, and how to maximize its cost-effectiveness. The Manual also includes a list of clinical findings that characterize patients whose mental symptoms are quite likely to be caused by an unrecognized physical disease.

“For several reasons, mental health professionals working within a mental health system have a professional and a legal obligation to recognize the presence of physical disease in their patients. First, physical diseases may cause a patient’s mental disorder. Second, physical disease may worsen a mental disorder, either by affecting brain function or by giving rise to a psychopathologic reaction. Third, mentally ill patients are often unable or unwilling to seek medical care and may harbor a great deal of undiscovered physical disease. Finally, a patient’s visit to a mental health program creates an opportunity to screen for physical disease in a symptomatic population. The yield of disease from such screening is usually higher than the yield in an asymptomatic population.”


The conclusions drawn in this manual are not theoretical; they were arrived at by extensive experimental evidence, and include such findings as:

“1. Nearly two out of five patients (39%) had an active, important physical disease.

“2. The mental health system had failed to detect these diseases in nearly half (47.5%) of the affected patients.

“3. Of all the patients examined, one in six had a physical disease that was related to his or her mental disorder, either causing or exacerbating that disorder.

“4. The mental health system had failed to detect one in six physical diseases that were causing a patient’s mental disorder.

“5. The mental health system had failed to detect more than half of the physical diseases that were exacerbating a patient’s mental disorder.”

The step-by-step procedures in this manual detected more physical diseases than the mental health programs had detected among 476 patients sampled, did so at a lower cost per diagnosed case, and can be performed by mental health personnel after very limited training.

Why Is This Important?

CCHR has always recommended a full, searching medical examination by a non-psychiatric health care professional, with appropriate clinical tests, to determine if there are undetected and untreated medical conditions that could be causing or contributing to mental distress.

The Missouri Department of Mental Health, with the recent passage of Senate Bill 716, is now instructed to develop guidelines for the screening and assessment of persons that address the interaction between physical and mental health to ensure that all potential causes of changes in behavior or mental status caused by or associated with a medical condition are assessed. This legislation goes into effect August 28, 2014.

One expects that this implies that those medical conditions found would then be medically treated, rather than simply passing out harmful and addictive psychotropic drugs, as is the more usual practice. We need to reinforce this expectation with our contacts, calls and letters to the Missouri DMH.

If you have professional expertise for helping to develop such guidelines, please volunteer your efforts to the Missouri Department of Mental Health.

If you would like to read the California Medical Evaluation Field Manual, you may download it from the CCHR St. Louis website.

Criminalization of Mental Health Care

Wednesday, July 2nd, 2014

Prisons: America’s New Asylums

Reference: “The Treatment of Persons with Mental Illness in Prisons and Jails: A State Survey”, 8 April 2014, Treatment Advocacy Center.

Although the Treatment Advocacy Center (TAC) is motivated primarily by psychiatric treatment and psychiatric drugs, they do present some interesting facts and viewpoints on mental health care in prisons and jails.

A major part of the treatment for prison inmates (used less for rehabilitation than for managing and disciplining inmates) is a regimen of powerful psychiatric drugs, despite numerous studies showing that aggression, violence and suicide are tied to their use. One study in California reported that 73 percent of prison suicides had a history of mental health treatment (meaning psychotropic drugs.)

The TAC report, of course, does not mention the violence and suicidal side effects of psychotropic drugs, preferring to push psych treatment and psych drugs instead.

Prisons and jails have become America’s new mental asylums. The number of individuals with serious mental symptoms in prisons and jails now exceeds the number of patients in state psychiatric hospitals tenfold. The cost of maintaining these inmates in prison skyrockets when psychiatric drugs are being used.

Notice we said “mental symptoms” instead of the popular press phrase “mental illness.” This is because, while people can indeed have debilitating mental trauma, this is not in fact a “mental illness”; it is a set of symptoms indicating some root cause which has not yet been found and handled. More than likely it is a legitimate medical problem that has not been diagnosed and treated, or it is the end result of illiteracy, or it is a side effect of taking drugs — legal or otherwise.

From 1770 to 1820 in the U.S., mentally traumatized persons were routinely confined in prisons and jails. This practice was inhumane, and it was replaced by housing such persons in hospitals until 1970. Since 1970 the earlier practice of routinely confining such persons in prisons and jails has resumed. So it has been known for almost 200 years that confining persons with mental trauma in prison is inhumane, yet this is now the current state of affairs.

In 2012, approximately 356 thousand inmates with mental health issues were confined in prisons and jails. On the other hand, only 35 thousand were in state psychiatric hospitals. In Missouri, it is estimated that 20 percent of the prison population has mental health issues, and this figure has apparently been steadily increasing.

TAC, in lockstep with the psycho-pharmaceutical industry, believes that providing appropriate treatment for inmates with mental health issues is the administration of psychiatric drugs.

Unfortunately, in TAC’s view, a prisoner can object to treatment with psychiatric drugs. Thus, the primary purpose of the referenced paper is to examine how psychiatric drugs can be forced on prison inmates without their permission. They call it “treatment over objection,” and it has its own mental diagnosis as justification.

This diagnosis is called “anosognosia,” from the Greek a + nosos + gnosis, meaning not + disease + knowing. In English terms, it means “ignorance of the presence of disease.” In other words, a person who refuses treatment (in this case a prison inmate refusing psychiatric drugs) is diagnosed with anosognosia as a justification for forcing treatment on the person against their will, since they are obviously ignorant of their own diseased condition.

In 1990, the U.S. Supreme Court (Washington v. Harper) held that an inmate with mental trauma need not be imminently dangerous before being medicated against his or her will, and that such an authorization may occur by administrative hearing rather than a judicial one. Thirty-one states, including Missouri, implement prison policies that allow an administrative (not a court) proceeding to force an inmate to take psychiatric drugs.

The Missouri Department of Corrections allows non-emergency involuntary administration of psychiatric drugs in cases where no immediate danger exists but the inmate poses a future likelihood of harm to self or others without treatment. The committee that authorizes this is composed of a psychiatrist, the associate superintendent, and the regional manager of mental health services. County jails may also use the same process.

The responsibility for helping people with mental trauma has gone to prisons and jails. Their primary method of treatment is psychotropic drugs known to cause violence and suicide — both when taking the drugs and when withdrawing from them. Prison violence and suicide are increasing; prison costs are increasing as more drugs are used; coercive measures are used to increase the prison population taking psychotropic drugs.

Does anyone see a problem with this trend?

FIND OUT! FIGHT BACK!

Our MO State Government at Work

Saturday, June 7th, 2014

Our MO State Government at Work

We thought you should know that the Governor of Missouri just signed a new law into effect in the area of mental health care.

HB1064 (House Bill 1064) removes references to the phrases “mentally retarded” and “mental retardation” from statute and replaces them with “intellectually disabled” and “intellectual disability”, respectively.

Unfortunately they did not enact any budget cuts to the Department of Mental Health. In fact, they raised the DMH budget from $1.6 billion last year to $1.8 billion this year. But our Missouri legislators have made sure that they are politically correct about it.

Raise your hand if you would like the DMH to show positive results for their $1.8 billion.

By positive results, we mean outcomes that are important to the patient, the patient’s family, and the social and work environments of the patient. We do not mean outcomes that are important for maintaining the budget and status quo of psychiatrists, psychiatric institutions, or the Department of Mental Health.

An example of a positive result (what we might call an Ideal Scene) would be: patients recovering and being sent, sane, back into society as productive individuals.

People in desperate circumstances must be provided proper and effective medical care. Medical care, not psychiatric “care”, attention, good nutrition, a healthy, safe environment and activity that promotes confidence will do far more than the brutality of psychiatry’s drug treatments. Housing and work will do more for the homeless than the life-debilitating effects of psychiatric drugs and other psychiatric treatments that destroy responsibility.

Now is the time to visit, call, write, email and otherwise contact your federal, state and local officials and let them know that they must start insisting on actual positive outcomes in exchange for their mental health budgets. Or lose their budgets. Call them out to show their results. And we don’t mean meaningless statistics like the number of prescriptions written or the number of patients involuntarily committed, or the number of gun permits issued or revoked; we mean the number of patients who have recovered from their mental trauma and are now home as productive members of society.

Do it now, please. And let us know the responses you get.

Mental Health Care Facts

Saturday, April 19th, 2014

Mental Health Care Facts

In 2001 the U.S. spent $85 billion on mental health services.

In 2008 the U.S. spent $170 billion on mental health services.

In 2014 Missouri has budgeted over $1.8 billion on mental health services, of which over $1 billion comes from the Federal government.

In 2015 the U.S. is expected to spend $280 billion on mental health services.

The public, through Medicaid and Medicare programs, covers 60% of this cost.

These figures do not include the costs of SSI (Supplemental Security Income) and SSDI (Social Security Disability Insurance) disability programs. The lifetime cost of caring for an 18-year-old who goes onto disability for mental illness can be expected to exceed $2 million.

In 1990 11.16 million people in the U.S. were treated for psychiatric disorders compared to 21.77 million people in 2003. In 1990 1.47 million people were on U.S. government disability roles compared to 3.25 million people in 2003.

This situation is not getting better. People are not getting well from psychiatric care. Perhaps you know someone on disability or who is in psychiatric treatment. Are they getting well?

The long-term recovery rate for schizophrenia patients is 30% better if they are not taking anti-psychotic drugs.

Virtually anyone at any given time can temporarily meet the criteria for bipolar disorder or ADHD.

120 million people worldwide have been diagnosed with mental disorders and placed on psychiatric drugs as “treatment.”

There are no medical or scientific tests that can prove mental disorders are medical conditions. Psychiatric diagnosis is based solely on opinion.

The fact is, there are many medical conditions, that undetected and untreated, can appear as psychiatric ‘symptoms. There are non-harmful, non-drug solutions to treating problems of mood, attention, behavior that do not require a psychiatric diagnosis or psychiatric “treatment” (drugs) but can be effectively treated with standard medical, not psychiatric, treatment.

CCHR has compiled all international drug regulatory warnings and studies about psychiatric drug risks into an easy to search psychiatric drug database.

Support CCHR St. Louis so that we may continue to spread the word about psychiatric fraud and abuse.

Amazon will now donate 0.5% of the price of your eligible AmazonSmile purchases to Citizens Commission On Human Rights of St. Louis when you shop at AmazonSmile.

Citizens Commission on Human Rights STL