Posts Tagged ‘Mental Health’

Mental Health Care Facts

Saturday, April 19th, 2014

Mental Health Care Facts

In 2001 the U.S. spent $85 billion on mental health services.

In 2008 the U.S. spent $170 billion on mental health services.

In 2014 Missouri has budgeted over $1.8 billion on mental health services, of which over $1 billion comes from the Federal government.

In 2015 the U.S. is expected to spend $280 billion on mental health services.

The public, through Medicaid and Medicare programs, covers 60% of this cost.

These figures do not include the costs of SSI (Supplemental Security Income) and SSDI (Social Security Disability Insurance) disability programs. The lifetime cost of caring for an 18-year-old who goes onto disability for mental illness can be expected to exceed $2 million.

In 1990 11.16 million people in the U.S. were treated for psychiatric disorders compared to 21.77 million people in 2003. In 1990 1.47 million people were on U.S. government disability roles compared to 3.25 million people in 2003.

This situation is not getting better. People are not getting well from psychiatric care. Perhaps you know someone on disability or who is in psychiatric treatment. Are they getting well?

The long-term recovery rate for schizophrenia patients is 30% better if they are not taking anti-psychotic drugs.

Virtually anyone at any given time can temporarily meet the criteria for bipolar disorder or ADHD.

120 million people worldwide have been diagnosed with mental disorders and placed on psychiatric drugs as “treatment.”

There are no medical or scientific tests that can prove mental disorders are medical conditions. Psychiatric diagnosis is based solely on opinion.

The fact is, there are many medical conditions, that undetected and untreated, can appear as psychiatric ‘symptoms. There are non-harmful, non-drug solutions to treating problems of mood, attention, behavior that do not require a psychiatric diagnosis or psychiatric “treatment” (drugs) but can be effectively treated with standard medical, not psychiatric, treatment.

CCHR has compiled all international drug regulatory warnings and studies about psychiatric drug risks into an easy to search psychiatric drug database.

Support CCHR St. Louis so that we may continue to spread the word about psychiatric fraud and abuse.

Amazon will now donate 0.5% of the price of your eligible AmazonSmile purchases to Citizens Commission On Human Rights of St. Louis when you shop at AmazonSmile.

Citizens Commission on Human Rights STL

Relieve the physical stress associated with mental stress

Wednesday, March 26th, 2014

CCHR STL Public Seminar

No one denies that people can have difficult problems in their lives, that at times they can be mentally unstable. People in desperate circumstances must be provided proper and effective health care.
Learn about physical stressors that exacerbate mental symptoms.

Learn about health care alternatives to harmful psychiatric drugs and treatments.

This is not to say that mental troubles are physical. They are not. Psychiatrists argue that mental disorders are biologically based to justify using treatments that cause more physical stress and further overwhelm the mind.

Relieve the Stress!


You are invited to attend the next Citizens Commission on Human Rights of St. Louis FREE public seminar.

It is vital that our families, friends, and associates know about healthy alternatives to harmful psychiatric “treatment.” You need to know there are alternatives to psychiatric fraud and abuse.

Saturday, 5 April 2014

Noon to 3:00 PM (lunch will be provided)

Location: 2nd Floor auditorium of the Church of Scientology of Missouri, 6901 Delmar Blvd., University City, Missouri 63130 — just west of the U City City Hall.

RSVP TO RESERVE YOUR SPOT NOW! Email your RSVP to CCHRSTL@CCHRSTL.ORG.

Feel free to forward this invitation and to bring others to the seminar.

ADHD and Fluoride

Monday, March 10th, 2014

ADHD and Fluoride

A recently published scientific study links various developmental disabilities with fluoride poisoning.

[Lancet Neurol 2014;13:330-38; February 15, 2014; "Neurobehavioral effects of developmental toxicity"]

Here are some salient quotes.

“Neurodevelopmental disabilities, including autism, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, dyslexia, and other cognitive impairments, affect millions of children worldwide, and some diagnoses seem to be increasing in frequency. Industrial chemicals that injure the developing brain are among the known causes for this rise in prevalence. …epidemiological studies have documented…developmental neurotoxicants” including fluoride.

“Strong evidence exists that industrial chemicals widely disseminated in the environment are important contributors to what we have called the global, silent pandemic of neurodevelopmental toxicity. The developing human brain is uniquely vulnerable to toxic chemical exposures, and major windows of developmental vulnerability occur in utero and during infancy and early childhood. During these sensitive life stages, chemicals can cause permanent brain injury at low levels of exposure that would have little or no adverse effect in an adult.”

“…studies of children exposed to fluoride in drinking water…suggests an average IQ decrement of about seven points in children exposed to raised fluoride concentrations.”

“Developmental neurotoxicity causes brain damage that is too often untreatable and frequently permanent.”

“The antisocial behaviour, criminal behaviour, violence, and substance abuse that seem to result from early-life exposures to some neurotoxic chemicals result in increased needs for special educational services, institutionalisation, and even incarceration.”

“Our very great concern is that children worldwide are being exposed to unrecognized toxic chemicals that are silently eroding intelligence, disrupting behaviours, truncating future achievements, and damaging societies.”

We might also point out that fluorine is a significant component of Prozac (fluoxetine hydrochloride, C17H18F3NO•HCL) and Paxil (paroxetine hydrochloride, C19H20FNO3•HCl•1/2H2O), both common psychiatric antidepressants with rather damaging side effects.

Admittedly, fluorine in chemical combination may behave differently than fluorine or fluoride (an ion of fluorine) alone, and there are those who argue that this difference is significant. The actual evidence, however, indicates otherwise. Regardless of any effect fluoride may have on teeth, it is a toxic substance and should be treated with caution, especially as a major component of a psychiatric drug.

See also the articles “Neurological Impact of Fluoride Toxicity“; “Fluoride Facts: The Inconvenient Truths“; “Chinese Studies Link Fluoride to Low IQ Scores“. For more detailed information, download the book “Directory of Somatopsychic Diseases and Conditions” containing 1400 assorted diseases, medical conditions, and toxins that either cause, exacerbate, or are associated with psychiatric illness.

Stress

Sunday, February 9th, 2014

Stress

Our research leading to the recent newsletter on Marijuana turned up many references to “stress” — the relief of stress by smoking pot; the stress caused by not having access to pot; the tension caused by opposing points of view on the use of pot; myriad stress-relief programs; the stress caused by adverse reactions, side effects and withdrawal symptoms of pot-smoking.

We thought it would be appropriate, therefore, to write about the subject of stress. It is obviously a term of great interest to psychiatry as well. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), the billing bible of the mental health care industry, names it explicitly as a billable diagnosis.

  • Acute Stress Disorder (308.3, DSM-IV)
  • Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (309.81, DSM-IV)
  • Trauma- and Stressor-Related Disorders (an entire chapter in DSM-5); including various manifestations of PTSD, acute stress disorder, adjustment disorders, and reactive attachment disorder.

There are even “DSM-5 Self-Exam Questions” with which you can diagnose yourself for stress-related symptoms.

Then there is ICD-10, the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems 10th Revision. This is a coding of diseases and signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances and external causes of injury or diseases, as classified by the World Health Organization. ICD-10 has its own classification of various stressors such as phobias, anxieties, adjustment disorders, and so on. The deadline for the United States to begin using Clinical Modification ICD-10-CM for diagnosis coding is currently October 1, 2014.

Let’s go over the basics, the dictionary definitions of the word “stress.” There are many; here are some:

  • a state of mental tension and worry caused by problems in life or work
  • something that causes strong feelings of worry or anxiety
  • physical force or pressure
  • a constraining force or influence
  • the burden on one’s emotional or mental well-being created by demands or difficulties

[from Middle English stresse stress, distress, hardship, short for destresse which is from Anglo-French destresce, from Latin districtus, past participle of distringere to grip with force, to draw tight]

“Acute stress response” was first described by Walter Cannon in the 1920s as a theory that animals react to threats with a general discharge of the sympathetic nervous system. The response was later recognized as the first stage of a general adaptation syndrome that regulates stress responses among vertebrates and other organisms (from Wikipedia.)

Here are some additional terms and phrases associated with the concept of stress that one might consider as either causes or symptoms:

  • suppression on one or more parts of one’s life
  • boredom
  • lack of a goal or purpose in life
  • exhaustion
  • overwhelm
  • physical or mental shock
  • exposure to someone antagonistic to oneself or one’s efforts
  • an accumulation in life of turmoil, distress, failure, pain, loss or injury

For comparison, here are some of the concepts encompassing opposites of stress (which we might generally just consider as an absence of stress):

  • survival
  • success
  • health
  • vitality
  • comfort
  • relaxation

We would like to make it very clear that STRESS IS NOT A MENTAL ILLNESS! It is the reaction to a stressor. It is not a deficiency of cannabis or Prozac, and cannot be fixed with a drug. It can only be fixed by finding and eliminating the causes of the stress. Notice we said “causes” plural; if you knew the one thing that was causing your stress, you would have already fixed it. Of course, there are many, many single things that, when found and fixed, could significantly reduce or eliminate those particular stressors.

Bodies also have their own forms of stress, for example chronic age-related diseases are linked to inflammation in the body; and oxidative stress occurs when the body is exposed to an excessive number of free radicals.

What’s keeping people from handling their stress?

Well, there are vested interests who want the general populace immobilized by stress. The psychopharmaceutical industry, for example.

Psychiatrists will not tell you that there are many safe and effective, non-psychiatric options for mental and emotional turmoil.

While life is full of problems, and those problems can sometimes be overwhelming, it is important to know that psychiatry, with its unscientific diagnoses and harmful treatments, are the wrong way to go. Their most common treatment, psychiatric drugs, only chemically mask problems and symptoms; they cannot and never will be able to solve life’s problems. Once the drug has worn off, the original problem remains, or may even deteriorate. Though psychiatrists classify their drugs as a solution to life’s problems, in the long run, they only make things worse.

According to top experts, the majority of people having mental problems are actually suffering from non-psychiatric disorders, which can cause emotional stress.

You can get a thorough physical examination from a competent medical—not a psychiatric—doctor to check for any underlying injury or illness that may be causing emotional distress.

It’s up to every individual to insist on it, and to insist on fully informed consent to any treatment.

Mary Jane comes to psychiatry

Monday, January 27th, 2014

Mary Jane comes to psychiatry

There has been a lot in the news recently about marijuana — “medical” marijuana, synthetic marijuana, legalizing marijuana, human interest stories about someone smoking marijuana, rants about the horrors of marijuana smoking — in short, every possible human reaction and little to none of the facts, especially how this brouhaha ties in to psychiatry.

Listening to a radio talk show today, we heard many cogent arguments both for and against legalizing marijuana with or without “medical use.” It was obvious there were not going to be any agreements made among those discussing the issues. However, this is not the real issue, which is hidden behind the psychiatric influence — or should we say, the issue IS the hidden psychiatric influence. Suddenly we have an entirely new crop of potential psychiatric patients, ripe for “stress relief” programs, “substance abuse” programs, psychiatric drugs to “treat” the side effects of smoking pot, and mental health “research” projects about how pot smoking affects mental health or vice versa.

A Google search for “marijuana” produced nearly 62 million results. The NFL is debating marijuana use. About 20 states and the District of Columbia allow the use of marijuana for medical purposes. Various factions within Oregon, Colorado, Nevada and Washington are either extolling or condemning its virtues. Around 25 million people in the U.S. are active marijuana users. The U.S. marijuana business is worth $113 billion. Marijuana is a Schedule I drug according to the FDA, meaning the drug has “no currently accepted medical use” and a “high potential for abuse.” The heat is on to change the FDA’s mind. Even Saturday Night Live has jumped into the fray.

Over 60% of Americans in drug treatment programs (of which 19% are aged 12 to 17) need treatment for marijuana. According to a National Household Survey on Drug Abuse, kids who frequently use marijuana are almost four times more likely to act violently or damage property. They are five times more likely to steal than those who do not use the drug.

Marijuana is often more potent today than it used to be, due to growing techniques and selective breeding. The THC (tetrahydrocannabinol, the active ingredient in marijuana) concentration has increased by as much as 12% over the past 30 years. Correspondingly, there has been a sharp increase in the number of marijuana-related emergency room visits by young pot smokers. Even pets are showing up in veterinary emergency rooms with marijuana intoxication.

Because a tolerance builds up, marijuana can lead users to consume stronger drugs to achieve the same high. When the effects start to wear off, the person may turn to more potent drugs to rid himself of the unwanted conditions that prompted him to take marijuana in the first place. Marijuana itself does not lead the person to other drugs; people take drugs to get rid of unwanted situations or feelings. The drug masks the problem for a time. When the high fades, the problem, unwanted condition or situation returns more intensely than before. The user may then turn to stronger drugs since marijuana no longer “works.”

Short-term Effects
Loss of coordination and distortions in the sense of time, vision and hearing
Sleepiness, reddening of the eyes, increased appetite, relaxed muscles
Sped up heart rate, up to five-fold in the first hour after smoking
Reduced performance through impaired memory and lessened ability to solve problems
Long-term Effects
Psychotic symptoms
Damage to heart and lungs, worsening the symptoms of bronchitis and causing coughing and wheezing
Reduction of the body’s ability to fight lung infections and illness
Addiction

How Do Drugs Work?

Drugs are essentially poisons. The amount taken determines the effect. A small amount acts as a stimulant. A greater amount acts as a sedative. A still larger amount poisons and can kill. This is true of any drug. Only the amount needed to achieve the effect differs.

Drugs block off all sensations, the desirable ones along with the unwanted ones. While drugs might be of short-term value in the handling of pain, they wipe out ability, alertness, and muddy one’s thinking. One always has a choice between being dead with drugs or alive without them.

Drugs affect the mind and destroy creativity. Drug residues lodge in the fatty tissues of the body and stay there, continuing to affect the individual adversely long after the effect of the drug has apparently worn off.

How is psychiatry involved?

Stephen Hinshaw, professor of psychology at the University of California at Berkeley, said marijuana is a “cognitive disorganizer” that produces roughly the same effect in users as those associated with ADHD. However, psychiatrists are now starting to prescribe medical marijuana for children and adults diagnosed with ADHD.

Heavy marijuana users are more likely than non-users to be diagnosed with schizophrenia later in life, placing them squarely into the mental health care system. A recent study found that people who had used marijuana more than 50 times before the age of 18, had a threefold increased risk of developing symptoms diagnosed as schizophrenia later in life. Once diagnosed with schizophrenia, they are prescribed anti-psychotic drugs. Never mind that schizophrenia is a fake disease; the symptoms are decidedly uncomfortable.

Smokeable herbal products, so-called synthetic marijuana, have been marketed as being “legal” and as providing a marijuana-like high. These products consist of plant material that has been coated with research chemicals that claim to mimic THC. Brands such as “Spice,” “K2,” “Blaze,” and “Red X Dawn” are labeled as herbal incense or bath salts to mask their intended purpose. Emergency room physicians report that individuals that use these types of products experience serious side effects such as anxiety attacks and other psychotic behavior. Psychiatrists may fraudulently diagnose these symptoms as a mental illness and prescribe psychotropic drugs.

Psychiatrists already have a name for marijuana addiction, “Cannabis Use Disorder.” A recent British study published in Schizophrenia Bulletin claims that mental illnesses are triggered six years earlier in patients who have smoked high-strength cannabis every day. Dr. Marti Di Forti, who led the study, wrote: “Daily use, especially of high-potency cannabis, drives the earlier onset of psychosis in cannabis users.”

Let’s not forget the withdrawal symptoms, which are similar to those of withdrawal from smoking and include irritability, sleep difficulties and anxiety, all of which can be mistaken for psychiatric symptoms leading to the prescription of psychotropic drugs.

We are already seeing many more articles discussing the chicken or egg question — that is, which came first, the mental illness or the marijuana? Of course, this wrong target ignores the real reason for drug use, described above as an unwanted condition, situation or feeling.

We are already seeing massive wasted research dollars going to psychiatrists to investigate the connections between marijuana and schizophrenia, or between marijuana and bipolar, or between marijuana and PTSD, or between…you get the idea.

The psychopharmaceutical industry is already salivating over the new crop of “Cannabis Use Disorder” patients who will be needing “substance abuse treatment.”

What do we do?

Rather, what do YOU do? What CAN you do? Something can ALWAYS be done about it!

Find Out! Fight Back!

That’s right. Educate yourself, your family, your friends, your associates, your school board, your church, your Chamber of Commerce, your Lions Club. Spread the word. Forward this newsletter. Challenge the proliferation of false information. Distribute the CCHR booklets and DVDs on the dangers of psychotropic drugs. Have a CCHR DVD party and show a DVD to your peers. Donate to CCHR so that we can continue to distribute the true information — CCHR St. Louis needs donations to give Missouri legislators CCHR documentary DVDs. Write letters to your local, state and federal officials. Write Letters to the Editor of your local radio, TV, and newspapers. Come to the CCHR St. Louis Public Seminars and bring your friends.

Or, you could always just do nothing, and watch this nation’s children grow up smoking pot and becoming patients for life in the mental health care system.

Aspartame Side Effects

Thursday, January 9th, 2014

Aspartame Side Effects

“The most widely used artificial sweetener — aspartame or Nutra-sweet — is a neurotoxic substance that has been associated with numerous health problems including dizziness, visual impairment, severe muscle aches, numbing of extremities, pancreatitis, high blood pressure, retinal hemorrhaging, seizures and depression.” [from the book Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon, Revised Second Edition, New Trends Publishing, 2001, page 51]

These statements are supported by research published in 1993 by psychiatrists from Northeastern Ohio University, Western Reserve Care System, and University Hospitals of Cleveland:

“This study was designed to ascertain whether individuals with mood disorders are particularly vulnerable to adverse effects of aspartame. Although the protocol required the recruitment of 40 patients with unipolar depression and a similar number of individuals without a psychiatric history, the project was halted by the [Western Reserve Care System] Institutional Review Board after a total of 13 individuals had completed the study because of the severity of reactions within the group of patients with a history of depression. … It would appear that individuals with mood disorders are particularly sensitive to this artificial sweetener; its use in this population should be discouraged.” ["Adverse Reactions to Aspartame: Double-Blind Challenge in Patients from a Vulnerable Population", Biol. Psychiatry v.34 pp.13-17 1993, by Ralph G. Walton, Robert Hudak, and Ruth J. Green-Waite]

The theory that mental disorders derive from a “chemical imbalance” in the brain is unproven opinion, not fact. People in desperate circumstances must be provided proper and effective medical care. Medical, not psychiatric, attention, good nutrition, a healthy, safe environment and activity that promotes confidence will do far more than the brutality of psychiatry’s “treatments.” The brain is your body’s most energy-intensive organ. It represents only three percent of your body weight but utilizes twenty-five percent of your body’s oxygen, nutrients and circulating glucose. Therefore any significant metabolic disruptions can impact brain function first.

Humane mental health hospitals and homes must be established to replace coercive psychiatric institutions. These must have a full complement of competent physical (non-psychiatric) doctors and medical diagnostic equipment, which non-psychiatric medical doctors can use to thoroughly examine and test for all underlying physical problems that may be manifesting as disturbed behavior. Government and private funds should be channeled into this rather than abusive psychiatric institutions and programs that have proven not to work.

All citizens need to be informed and educated about what is going on with psychiatric fraud and abuse. Your life and the future of our country is at stake. The information CCHR provides is vital to your survival. It is also vital to the survival of your friends and you should send this information on to your friends and recommend they subscribe to this newsletter.

Orthomolecular Medicine

Wednesday, December 25th, 2013

Orthomolecular Medicine

No one denies that people can have difficult problems in their lives, that at times they can be mentally unstable. Mental health care is therefore both valid and necessary. However, the emphasis must be on workable mental healing methods that improve and strengthen individuals and thereby society by restoring people to personal strength, ability, competence, confidence, stability, responsibility and spiritual well-being.

People in desperate circumstances must be provided proper and effective medical care. Medical, not psychiatric, attention, good nutrition, a healthy, safe environment and activity that promotes confidence will do far more than the brutality of psychiatry’s treatments.

The following information is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness; it is provided for educational purposes only. Do not suddenly stop taking psychiatric drugs as this may provoke severe withdrawal symptoms. Consult a competent, non-psychiatric, health care provider who can perform clinical tests and discover root causes of distress.

[The following information on orthomolecular medicine is taken from www.orthomolecular.org.]

In 1969 Linus Pauling coined the word “orthomolecular” to denote the use of naturally occurring substances, particularly nutrients, in maintaining health and treating disease. Orthomolecular medicine describes the practice of preventing and treating disease by providing the body with optimal amounts of substances which are natural to the body.

["ortho-" is a combining form from Greek orthós meaning straight, upright, right, correct]

Orthomolecular medicine is the achievement and preservation of good mental health by the provision of the optimum molecular environment for the mind, especially the optimum concentrations of substances normally present in the human body, such as the vitamins. There is evidence that an increased intake of some vitamins, including ascorbic acid, niacin pyridoxine, and cyanocobalamin, is useful in treating schizophrenia.

Nutrient related disorders are always treatable and deficiencies are usually curable. To ignore their existence is tantamount to malpractice. To deny the patient information and access to alternative treatment is to deny the patient informed consent for any other treatment.

[The following information on orthomolecular medicine is taken from www.alternativementalhealth.com.]

Orthomolecular medicine may be helpful for mood and behaviour disorders, commonly misdiagosed by psychiatrists. This broad grouping includes symptoms such as anxiety, severe depression, bipolar disorder, postpartum depression, hormonal depression, seasonal affective disorder, OCD, ADHD, ODD, and addictive behavior.

It is not uncommon to see toxic levels of lead, mercury, aluminum, and copper on lab test results of mood and behaviour disorder patients. The thyroid and adrenal glands are compromised in the majority of mental health cases.

Hypoglycemia is the term that describes low sugar in the blood. The brain’s demand for glucose is so immense that about 20% of the total blood volume circulates to the brain. Neurons function poorly in sugar deficient states. The hypoglycemic state involves a sharp rise of simple sugars in the blood followed by a sharp decline which robs the neurons of their main energy source; the sharper the decline, the greater the effect on brain cells. Irritability, poor memory, “late afternoon blues”, poor concentration, tiredness, cold hands, muscle cramping, and “feeling better when fighting” are typical hypoglycemic symptoms.

Mood and behaviour disorder patients have the potential to exhibit mild to severe food intolerance symptoms. The digestive tract reacts to food allergens by eliciting an immune response.


For more information about alternatives to psychiatric treatments consult the following resources:

http://www.cchrint.org/alternatives/

http://www.cchrflorida.org/recommended-medical-list.html

http://www.cchrstl.org/causes.shtml

http://www.cchrstl.org/alternatives.shtml

Obesity and Psychiatry

Friday, November 15th, 2013

Obesity and Psychiatry

On June 18, 2013 the American Medical Association voted to declare obesity a disease.

Obesity and various eating disorders have been a topic of discussion at the American Psychiatric Association for some time. The debate continues, whether to declare obesity a psychiatric disorder or not.

Obese: (medical definition) An abnormal accumulation of body fat, usually 20% or more over an individual’s ideal body weight, where ideal body weight corresponds to the weight having the lowest death rate for individuals of a specific height, gender and age. In general practice, obese corresponds to a Body Mass Index (BMI) over 30, where BMI = (weight in pounds)*703 / [(height in inches)*( height in inches)].

BMI is used because for most people it correlates with the amount of body fat, although BMI does not directly measure body fat. Observation and judgment are therefore part of the determination. There are many other considerations that could be taken into account, including age, gender, culture, body frame size, and general health.

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Revision 4 (DSM-IV) includes “Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified,” and only discusses obesity as needing further research.

The latest revision, DSM-5, goes a step further by including “Binge Eating Disorder,” a type of overeating, but again sidesteps the topic of obesity.

While obesity is not explicitly in the DSM, the APA has certainly not dismissed its interest in eventually including it in future revisions, as soon as they can point to any research that might link obesity with any “mental disorder.” It is a topic of extensive speculation.

Interestingly enough, there is actual medical science being done on the subject of obesity. Enough, in fact, that we can look forward to actual medical or dietary conditions that will obviate any inclination to categorize it as a mental disorder and hence ripe for psychiatric drugging.

The September, 2013 issue of Scientific American contains an article by Gary Taubes of interest about obesity, “Which one will make you fat?” subtitled “Rigorously controlled studies may soon give us a definitive answer about what causes obesity — excessive calories or the wrong carbyhydrates”.

This article’s conclusion is that, “One ultimate goal is to assure the general public that whatever dietary advice it receives — for weight loss, overall health and prevention of obesity — is based on rigorous science, not preconceptions or blind consensus.”

One truly hopes for rigorous science in this regard, since the alternative seems to be the blind consensus of the psychiatric industry co-opting obesity for its own nefarious purposes, much as it did for autism.

It should be further noted that weight gain is a common side effect of anti-depressant drugs, anti-psychotic drugs, and anti-anxiety drugs.

You might be interested in exactly why psychiatric drugs do not help. Check it out here!

Public Seminar Invitation

Sunday, October 20th, 2013

CCHR STL Public Seminar

Protect Yourself and Your Loved Ones from psychiatric Abuse

Practical Drilling — How to Handle psychiatric Lies

You are invited to attend the next Citizens Commission on Human Rights of St. Louis FREE public seminar.

It is vital that our families, friends, and associates can recognize psychiatric fraud and abuse and know how to respond when their loved ones are being pressured to accept psychiatric “treatment.”

Your family doctor may prescribe psychiatric drugs without telling you what they are! How should you handle this?

Saturday, 16 November 2013

Noon to 3:00 PM (lunch will be provided)

Location: 2nd Floor auditorium of the Church of Scientology of Missouri, 6901 Delmar Blvd., University City, Missouri — just west of the U City City Hall.

RSVP TO RESERVE YOUR SPOT NOW! Email your RSVP to CCHRSTL@CCHRSTL.ORG.

Feel free to forward this invitation and to bring others to the seminar.

U.S. Military Mental Health Costs Skyrocket

Tuesday, October 1st, 2013

U.S. Military Mental Health Costs Skyrocket

[The following report is from NextGov.com, an information resource for federal technology decision makers, and the CRS report cited.]

The Congressional Research Service (CRS) just put a price tag on the mental health costs of the long wars in Afghanistan and Iraq: about $4.5 billion between 2007 and 2012. The Defense Department spent $958 million on mental health treatment in 2012, roughly double the $468 million it spent in 2007.

Eighty-nine percent of spending on mental disorder treatment between 2007 and 2012 — approximately $4 billion — went for active duty service members. Over the same time frame, the military health system spent about $461 million on mental health care treatment for activated Guard and Reserve members.

Of the nearly $1 billion the military medical system spent in fiscal 2012 on mental disorder treatments for active duty and activated National Guard and reserve members, CRS said more than half of the costs, about $567 million, were for outpatient active duty mental health care.

Between 2001 and 2011, the rate of mental health diagnoses among active duty service members increased approximately 65 percent, CRS reported. A total of 936,283 service members, or former service members during their period of service, have been diagnosed with at least one mental disorder over this time, CRS said.

The CRS report [R43175 "Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Other Mental Health Problems in the Military: Oversight Issues for Congress" August 8, 2013], written by Katherine Blakeley, a foreign affairs analyst, and Don J. Jansen, a Defense health care policy analyst, said the reported incidence of post traumatic stress disorder soared 650 percent, from about 170 diagnoses per 100,000 person years in 2000 to approximately 1,110 diagnoses per 100,000 person years in 2011.

Though Defense spent $4 billion on mental health treatment for active duty service members from 2007 through 2012, the CRS report questioned exactly what the Pentagon got for its money. “There are scant data documenting which treatments patients receive or whether those treatments were appropriate and timely,” the report said. Additionally, “Reliable evidence is lacking as to the quality of mental health care and counseling offered in DOD facilities.”

Beginning in 2010, suicide has been the second-leading cause of death for active duty servicemembers, behind only war injuries. Between 1998 and 2011, 2,990 servicemembers on active duty have died by suicide, with an incidence rate of approximately 14 per 100,000 person years. However, the suicide rate among active duty servicemembers has sharply increased since 2005, reaching a peak of 18.5 per 100,000 in 2009 and declining slightly to 17.5 per 100,000 in 2010 and 18 per 100,000 in 2011.

Of the 301 servicemembers who died by suicide in 2011, 40% received outpatient behavioral health care, while 17% had received outpatient behavioral health services within the month prior to suicide; 15% had received inpatient behavioral health treatment; 26% had a known history of psychotropic medication use, most frequently antidepressants.

Of the 915 active duty servicemembers who attempted suicide in 2011, 43% had a known history of psychotropic medication use, most frequently antidepressants, and 61% had received outpatient behavioral health services within the month prior to suicide.


This and other reports persist in declaring that the reasons for high rates of military suicides are not clear. However, the scientific research documenting the connection between violence, suicide and psychiatric drugs is overwhelming. When you contact your federal officials, Senators, and Representatives, tell them to investigate the relationship between psychiatric drugs, violence and suicide. For more information about this relationship, download and read the CCHR booklet “Psychiatric Drugs Create Violence and Suicide.”

Forward this newsletter to everyone you know and recommend they subscribe.