Posts Tagged ‘Mental Health’

Moving The Needle in Mental Health Care

Monday, November 29th, 2021

Former National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Director Thomas Insel admitted that genetic and neuroscience research on the causes of mental illness has not moved the needle in improving mental health care after $20 billion of investment.

Here’s the full quote of what he said:
“I spent 13 years at NIMH really pushing on the neuroscience and genetics of mental disorders, and when I look back on that I realize that while I think I succeeded in getting lots of really cool papers published by cool scientists at fairly large cost ? I think $20 billion ? I don’t think we moved the needle in reducing suicide, reducing hospitalizations, improving recovery for the tens of millions of people who have mental illness.”

There are a couple of take-aways from this revealing admission.

First, NIMH has totally wasted a large chunk of taxpayer money for no result. Their funding should be halted. Second, they still think they are addressing something called “mental illness.” This deserves some additional explanation.

Psychiatric disorders, fraudulently called “mental illness”, are not medical diseases. The term “mental illness” is a red herring, which means “something that distracts attention from the real issue”.

There are no clinical lab tests, brain scans, X-rays or chemical imbalance tests that can verify any mental disorder is a physical condition. This is not to say that people do not get depressed, or that people can’t experience emotional or mental duress, but psychiatry has repackaged these emotions and behaviors as “disease” or “illness” in order to sell drugs and other harmful “treatments”. This is a brilliant marketing campaign, but it is not science.

What is the Real Issue?

Psychiatrists proclaim a worldwide epidemic of mental health problems and urge massive funding increases as the only solution. But is this the real crisis in mental health today?

Funds are appropriated for a general “mental health crisis” that does not factually exist, but is fabricated by psychiatry to protect and perpetuate their bloated budgets. Funding is thus diverted from workable programs that can resolve the social problems psychiatry has failed to solve.

According to psychiatric thinking, the solution for everything from the most minor to the most severe personal problem is strictly limited to diagnosis with the fraudulent Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), assigning a mental illness label, and prescribing a restrictive, generally coercive and costly range of harmful treatments.

As we continue to see after decades of psychiatric monopoly over the world’s mental health, this has lead only to upwardly spiraling mental illness statistics, continuously escalating funding demands, and no cures.

The real crisis in mental health today is that after years of psychiatric funding, instead of seeing better mental health in society we see continuing failures of psychiatric practice and  worsening mental health.

Medical studies have shown time and again that for many patients, what appear to be mental problems are actually caused by an undiagnosed and untreated physical illness or condition. This does not mean a “chemical imbalance” or a “brain-based disease.” It does not mean that mental illness is physical. It does mean that ordinary medical problems can affect behavior and outlook.

Look at the actual products of psychiatry, not at the lofty words. No Cures. Harmful and Addictive brain-modifying drugs. Harmful “treatments” like barbaric electroshock, lobotomies, and magnetic brain bombardment. Massive bureaucracy. And You Paid For It.

Recommendation

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) is the key to escalating mental illness statistics and psychotropic drug usage worldwide. Untold harm and colossal waste of mental health funds occur because of it. The DSM diagnostic system must be abandoned before real mental health reform can occur.

DSM-5

Is Social Media Turning Us All Into Zombies?

Monday, October 18th, 2021

The debate continues to rage about whether smartphones and their attendant social media are addictive, or even whether they are good or bad for you and your children.

This quote from the November 2021 edition of Reason magazine puts the debate more into perspective:

“In 1936, the government of St. Louis, Missouri, tried to ban car radios because a ‘determined movement’ had become convinced that the radio distracted drivers and caused car accidents. The car radio was widely feared by newspapers, which were competitors and had every incentive to sensationalize the product’s dangers.”

We’re not going to come down on one side or the other, it isn’t our fight; but we can certainly remark on the psychiatric connection.

The psychiatric Connection

Psychiatry assumes any so-called addiction is a medical disease. This is patently false; any such media addiction, real or imagined, is an educational or moral failing. It cannot be usefully addressed with drugs or other harmful psychiatric treatments.

Other forms of addiction currently promoted for treatment by psychiatry and psychology are gaming, substance abuse, gambling, and other impulse control issues such as pyromania, kleptomania and promiscuity. Yes, physical addiction may occur with substance abuse; but there are valid non-psychiatric programs for that.

So what are these various behaviors if they are not mental illnesses? They’re called lapses in education, ethics and morals, and when treated as such there is hope that they can be corrected. Unfortunately, calling them “mental illness” and treating them with psychotropic drugs precludes any possibility of finding out the true root causes and effectively addressing those.

The entirety of psychological and psychiatric addiction programs are founded on the tacit assumptions that mental health “experts” know all about the mind and mental phenomena, know a better way of life, a better value system and how to improve lives beyond the understanding and capability of everyone else in society.

The reality is that these mental health programs are designed to control people towards specific ideological objectives at the expense of the person’s sanity and well-being. Do we really want to institutionalize mandatory psychiatric counseling and screening, which is where all this is heading?

We think the whole thing comes back to what the late Professor Thomas Szasz, co-founder of Citizens Commission on Human Rights, originally had to say about this:
• “The term ‘mental illness’ refers to the undesirable thoughts, feelings, and behaviors of persons. Classifying thoughts, feelings, and behaviors as diseases is a logical and semantic error, like classifying the whale as a fish.”
• “If we recognize that ‘mental illness’ is a metaphor for disapproved thoughts, feelings, and behaviors, we are compelled to recognize as well that the primary function of Psychiatry is to control thought, mood, and behavior.”

These so-called mental disorders are just what psychiatry and psychology have inappropriately labeled as “undesirable behavior.”

The Reason article proposes a reasonable solution: “…can anything be done to combat some of the actual problems with tech addiction? Yes, but the answer isn’t easy or flashy: It’s for parents to exercise greater responsibility, talk to their kids about how much they rely on their phones, and set reasonable limits on screen time.”

What You Can Do

We’d like to encourage our readers to help us fund our efforts to bring sanity to the world of mental health care. The psychs haven’t backed off; they are busy exaggerating any mental health concerns raised by the Covid outbreak, and of course why you should see a psychiatrist and take some harmful and addictive psychiatric drugs.

Click here to send us some love.

‘Insanity’ isn’t an illness. It’s an injury. When more injuries called ‘treatments’ are piled on top of it, it becomes very hard to treat just because the person is now desperately injured. He hurts.

— L. Ron Hubbard, 12/15/1968

WHO Declares “Video Game Addiction” a Mental Health Disorder

Antipsychotic Antics

Wednesday, September 15th, 2021

Paliperidone, sold under the trade name Invega among others, is an atypical antipsychotic. Paliperidone is the primary active metabolite of the older antipsychotic risperidone, although its specific mechanism of action with respect to any psychiatric diagnosis is unknown. It blocks the action of dopamine and serotonin in the brain, which as we’ve previously observed is playing Russian Roulette with the brain.

On September 1, 2021 the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a 6-month injection form of the long-acting atypical antipsychotic paliperidone palmitate (Invega Hafyera, manufactured by Janssen Pharmaceuticals) for the treatment of what is fraudulently diagnosed as schizophrenia in adults.

Adverse reactions, or side effects, can include upper respiratory tract infection, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, seizures, high blood sugar, diabetes, decreased blood pressure, fainting, falls, low white blood cell count, headache, tachycardia, somnolence, insomnia, sexual dysfunction, cough, dystonia, akathisia, muscle rigidity, parkinsonism, weight gain, anxiety, indigestion, constipation, and an increased risk of death in elderly people with dementia-related psychosis.

It can be addictive and have acute withdrawal symptoms (euphemistically called “discontinuation syndrome”), including rapid relapse, nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, restlessness, increased sweating, trouble sleeping, a feeling of the world spinning, numbness, muscle pains, tardive dyskinesia, and psychosis.

The primary reason for prescribing a drug that has only two doses per year is to handle the situation where a patient stops taking their daily prescribed drugs because of their unpleasant side effects.

Psychiatric Fraud

Psychiatrists remain committed to calling “schizophrenia” a mental disorder despite, after a century of research, the complete absence of objective proof that it exists as a physical brain abnormality.

Psychiatry clings tenaciously to antipsychotics as the treatment for “schizophrenia,” despite their proven risks and studies which show that when patients stop taking these drugs, they improve.

The late Professor Thomas Szasz stated that “schizophrenia is defined so vaguely that, in actuality, it is a term often applied to almost any kind of behavior of which the speaker disapproves.”

These are normal people with medical, disciplinary, educational, or spiritual problems that can and must be resolved without recourse to drugs. Deceiving and drugging is not the practice of medicine. It is criminal.

Bear in mind that the drug “treatments” being prescribed are for “disorders” that are not physical illnesses—essentially, they are being prescribed for something that does not exist.

Any medical doctor who takes the time to conduct a thorough physical examination of a child or adult exhibiting signs of what a psychiatrist calls Schizophrenia can find undiagnosed, untreated physical conditions. Any person labeled with so-called Schizophrenia needs to receive a thorough physical examination by a competent medical—not psychiatric—doctor to first determine what underlying physical condition is causing the manifestation.

Any person falsely diagnosed as mentally disordered which results in treatment that harms them should file a complaint with the police and professional licensing bodies and have this investigated. They should seek legal advice about filing a civil suit against any offending psychiatrist and his or her hospital, associations and teaching institutions seeking compensation.

No one denies that people can have difficult problems in their lives, that at times they can be mentally unstable, subject to unreasonable depression, anxiety or panic. Mental health care is therefore both valid and necessary. However, the emphasis must be on workable mental healing methods that improve and strengthen individuals and thereby society by restoring people to personal strength, ability, competence, confidence, stability, responsibility and spiritual well–being. Psychiatric drugs and psychiatric treatments are not workable.

Psychiatry’s Dying Industry

Monday, September 6th, 2021

Report On Failed Mental Health Programs

A new resource on failed psychiatric treatment programs serves as advice to policymakers being asked to support and fund a resurgence of psychedelic drug therapies when in the sixties these caused harm and violence in the community.

The mental health watchdog Citizens Commission on Human Rights International (CCHR) has launched its online report and resource about failed mental health programs which are impacting psychiatric policy today. The release of Why Psychiatry Sees Itself as a Dying Industry—A Resource on Its Failures and Critics coincides with California legislators considering passing a law that will legalize possession of psychedelic hallucinogens and promote researching the mind-altering chemicals as treatment for “mental illness.”

A petition that CCHR’s Sacramento chapter posted online opposes this, joining many others concerned about resurrecting psychedelics that were a past failed psychiatric experiment. In California, LSD was also linked to the horrific Charles Manson murders in the 1960s.

It was the street use of and research into LSD in the 60s and 70s that led to Congress shutting down all LSD mind-control research in 1977.

CCHR says resurrecting LSD—a failed and dangerous therapy—to replace current failed treatments shows a fundamental disregard for human life because of the drugs’ mind-altering properties, also borne out by the psychiatric-intelligence community’s past research of LSD, psilocybin and amphetamines. As extensively researched in Tom O’Neill’s book, Chaos: Charles Manson, the CIA, and the Secret History of the Sixties, LSD helped create the mindset of the Charles Manson Family who, after many months of use of the drug, gruesomely murdered nine-month pregnant actress, Sharon Tate and four others in California August 1969.

CCHR’s report highlights similar failed mental treatment programs using a hefty body of evidence showing the lack of science behind psychiatry’s diagnostic system that led to unworkable and potentially damaging treatments, which includes psychedelics. United Nations Special Rapporteur and psychiatrist Dainius P?ras, M.D., recently noted that with psychiatry’s reliance upon biomedical interventions, we shouldn’t be surprised that “global psychiatry is facing a crisis, which to a large extent is a moral crisis, or a crisis of values.”

In October 2020, the World Psychiatric Association issued a Position Statement about improving mental health care, because widespread coercion in psychiatry violates patients’ “rights to liberty; autonomy; freedom from torture, inhuman or degrading treatment….”

CCHR says that when treatments fail and psychotropic drug patents run out, there are usually efforts to resurrect old treatments as “new miracles,” such as electroshock treatment and now psychedelics. The reason for the new market is there’s profit to be made. The psychedelic “therapy” industry is predicted to reach $7 billion by 2027.

CCHR, which was established in 1969, is responsible for over 190 laws that inform and protect consumers about mental health treatment risks. It suggests policymakers and appropriations committees apprise themselves of past psychedelic drug research risks, read CCHR’s report to prevent funding programs that have failed and involve dangerous practices, and base reforms on CCHR’s Mental Health Declaration of Human Rights.

Psychiatry an Industry of Death
Psychiatry an Industry of Death

Mental Health vs Mental Illness

Monday, August 23rd, 2021

We’ve heard a lot recently about Mental Health. The Olympics have brought to light the stresses of competition, grueling routines and being under constant public pressure and expectations to win—and carping criticism from spectators if the athlete fails to meet those expectations. It stands to reason that having a solid mental health outlook is a vital part of such challenges. And that it can falter.

We applaud all the athletes for not just their dedication and courage but also their service to sport and their respective countries.

While CCHR exposes psychiatric abuse, ultimately this is so that people can achieve true mental health—a positive outlook both emotionally and in thoughts and actions that enables a better life, not hampered by physically damaging “treatments.”

“Mental health,” as viewed in the psychiatric industry is seen as mental “illness:” using descriptive names based on biased observation to redefine not doing well mentally as a physical disease—with not a single medical test to confirm this. This often leads to the use of physically damaging treatments, but no cures. It is important to differentiate between psychiatry’s definition of “mental disorder” and what is mental health, and not confuse the two.

Rest assured, psychiatrists and psychologists will abuse the current mental health awareness to slip in the need for biochemical “solutions.” Like a Johns Hopkins university psychologist who claims a “really well-structured psychedelic” drug session is “equal to several years of ordinary psychotherapy.”

CCHR has always warned that psychiatry’s power rests on force and that true informed consent does not exist in the mental health system when it fails to inform those needing help that a mental disorder diagnosis is not based on scientific tests and that drugs and electroshock given in the absence of fully informed consent constitutes torture or cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment.

Recent United Nations and World Health Organization (WHO) reports agree—vindicating what CCHR has been fighting for for over 50 years!

The World Psychiatric Association (WPA) issued a statement acknowledging the international outrage over psychiatric coercion and called for alternatives to psych drugs and restraint use.

A former United Nations Special Rapporteur on health, Dr. Dainius P?ras, recently was interviewed for Psychiatric Times in the U.S. and condemned coercive psychiatry. He said that psych diagnoses perpetuate discrimination; biological psychiatry hasn’t worked and equated it with “totalitarian and authoritarian regimes.” He called for the “elimination of all forced psychiatric confinement and treatment.”

Relevant to the recent awareness about mental health, Dr. P?ras also said: “There is now unequivocal evidence of the failures of a system that relies too heavily on the biomedical model,” including psychotropic drugs.

Then the WHO issued a new guideline for mental health treatment in July, attacking “coercive psychiatry” as “pervasive” and that it must change. It supported a ban on “forced hospitalization and forced treatment,” including drugs and electroshock.

It is important for people to know the differences between mental health and psychiatric “disease,” and to be informed of the failures of this profession in ensuring mental health is achieved as opposed to creating mental ill-health.

Failed Mental Health Programs

A new major resource from CCHR International answers questions about why is psychiatry so controversial? Why do critics think psychiatry creates unhappiness, rather than curing it? How is it that psychiatric treatment causes harm? Why is that other doctors don’t think psychiatrists are “real doctors”? Why are psychiatrists their own worst enemies, while blaming their failures on both their patients and an “anti-psychiatry” movement that they, in fact, started?

Download and read this new publication, “Why Psychiatry Sees Itself as a Dying Industry  A Resource on its Failures and Critics.”

Support CCHR

Your support in helping CCHR would mean a great deal. Your help, as always, is an integral part of our success in raising awareness and being able to deliver the facts. Please donate to support the cause.

Volunteer help is also appreciated.

Psychiatrists Redefine “Recovery”

Monday, August 2nd, 2021

Because psychiatry doesn’t work, psychiatrists have had to redefine the idea of “recovery” to ensure their own survival.

The lexicon of psychiatry engenders a false view of the human condition. When such words are used, one should be warned that psychiatry borrows from the language of medicine to look legitimate, but this is only to disguise its utter lack of claim to any authority. An example is the term “mental illness,” a fraudulent usage that implies a medical condition, when psychiatrists know that there is no valid medical, clinical test for any psychiatric diagnosis.

Would you go to a practitioner to treat an illness if you knew that practitioner couldn’t cure that illness? Likely not.

Such is the case with psychiatry – their treatments are not cures. Psychiatric drugs are more akin to over-the-counter cold remedies. They seek to minimize the symptoms of the so called “illness” without ever addressing its cause.

For psychiatrists and pharmaceutical companies, long term treatment of symptoms is far more profitable than a cure. After all, a person with an infection can be cured in very short order with a small regimen of relatively inexpensive antibiotic medications. A person taking expensive new generation antidepressants is a long term customer and far more profitable.

According to the President’s New Freedom Commission on Mental Health (Final Report July 22, 2003), “The discovery of effective treatments using medications currently on the market is also encouraging. However, since these medications are treatments and not cures, some individuals with chronic illnesses, including children, are expected to use these medications over an extended period of time.”

So, psychiatry has had a problem. How do you attract patients if you can’t cure them? The solution to this problem is Public Relations (PR), a careful selection of words and the redefinition of the concept of “recovery”.

Psychiatric front groups openly promote that mental trauma is “treatable” but will never say that it is curable.

Psychiatric proponents believe that people don’t seek psychiatric care because of their negative attitudes about mental trauma and treatments. One of the main negative attitudes is that psychiatric disorders are not curable. To counter public fear and negative attitudes the psychiatric PR machines heavily promote the idea of “recovery”.

We think it is important that you know exactly what psychiatrists mean when they say, “recovery”.

Traditional (allopathic) medical science says, “You’re ill. There is a pathogen or source of your illness. By identifying the cause of the illness we will give you treatment (e.g. medicine or surgery) to eliminate the illness at its source and you will no longer be ill.”

Psychiatry says “You’re ill. We don’t know what causes “mental illness”. We can randomly give you some medications which are known to minimize your symptoms in some people, some of the time. Although we cannot cure your condition there is some hope that over time with adherence to your medication that you may feel not as bad. When you have learned to come to terms with your condition, accept it and function in life despite it, we will consider that you have recovered.”

According to A. Kathryn Power, former Director for the Center for Mental Health Services in the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, “Recovery does not necessarily mean a cure. Recovery is a process, sometimes lifelong, through which a person achieves independence, self-esteem, and a meaningful life in the community.”

Certainly no one will disagree that people should have hope, independence, self-esteem, and a meaningful life in the community. We would wish these things for anyone. But by changing the very nature of the word “recovery” from “cured” to “has hope and is able to live despite a mental condition” we have moved psychiatry even farther away from a science and into the realm of a philosophy or even a religion. One could get the idea of a mental health consumer struggling his whole life to achieve this mythical state called, “recovery”.

You may see a number of public service announcements in the media showing mental health consumers who have “recovered.” Recognize them for what they are. They have not been cured. It’s debatable if they were even ill in the first place. They are however, life-long customers of the psychiatric industry and followers of the new religion of “recovery”.

Recognize that the real problem is that psychiatrists fraudulently diagnose life’s problems as an “illness”, and stigmatize unwanted behavior or study problems as “diseases”.

Psychiatry’s stigmatizing labels, programs and treatments are harmful junk science; their diagnoses of “mental disorders” are a hoax — unscientific, fraudulent and harmful. All psychiatric treatments, not just psychiatric drugs, are dangerous.

Contact your local, state and national officials and tell them what you think about this.

Is That Going To Be A Problem?

Monday, July 12th, 2021

Problems are huge now. Everyone has one or more of them. Seems like everyone accuses someone else of them. They are therefore a ripe subject for our blog. There’s a lot to know about the subject.

Some things to know about Problems

A problem is as important as it is related to survival.
The human mind’s basic purpose is the posing and resolving of problems related to survival.
Problems begin with an unpredictability.
Problems are a necessary component of games.
One might say that the best problem is one that never solves.
The old maxim “If you want something done, give it to a busy person to do,” expresses the idea that a person suffers if they do not have enough problems. A person chafes and grows bored when there is a total lack of problems. Giving a busy person one more thing to do adds to their problems, and thus they suffer less.
On the other hand, enough unsolved problems add up to a huge confusion. The balance between too few problems and too many of them is critical, and varies from person to person and time to time.

Some definitions of the word

Problem:
— A question or puzzle raised for inquiry, consideration, or solution.
— A source of perplexity, distress, or vexation.
— Something or someone difficult to achieve, deal with, or control.
— A matter or situation regarded as unwelcome or harmful and needing to be dealt with and overcome.

[From Greek problema, “obstacle”, from proballein “to throw forward”, from pro- “forward” + ballein “to throw”.]

Even better definitions, ones which lead to methods of resolution, are:
— Two or more opposed purposes; also expressed as Purpose versus Counter-purpose.
— Intention versus Counter-intention.
— Postulate versus Counter-postulate.
— Something that persists because it contains a lie or altered facts, since if it were totally truth it wouldn’t be a problem.

Problems and Creativity

Creation is a primary ability of a person. Unfortunately when a person loses their ability to create, about the only thing they can create is a problem. So somebody comes along and says, “Let’s all be happy and healthy.” Next thing you know, all you can see are problems about being happier or healthier. When the problems get too great to do something about, what happens then? One creates lies, because the lowest order of creation is lying, and the problem will then persist because it contains a lie.

Problems and Psychiatry

Problems are no stranger to psychiatrists. In fact, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is full of problems. (While the DSM itself is a problem, here we mean that many different problems are described in the DSM as mental disorders.)

Let’s give some examples. These are problem-related mental disorders listed in the DSM-5 for which psychiatrists can prescribe harmful and addictive psychotropic drugs:

— Academic or educational problem
— Other problem related to employment
— Other problem related to psychosocial circumstances
— Parent-child relational problem
— Phase of life problem
— Problem related to current military deployment status
— Problem related to lifestyle
— Problem related to living alone
— Problem related to living in a residential institution
— Problems related to multiparity [i.e. five or more childbirths]
— Problems related to other legal circumstances
— Problems related to release from prison
— Problems related to unwanted pregnancy
— Religious or spiritual problem
— Sibling relational problem
— Unspecified housing or economic problem
— Unspecified problem related to social environment
— Unspecified problem related to unspecified psychosocial circumstances

The Problem of Psychiatry

Psychiatry itself is a problem of magnitude. While psychiatry claims to be the arbiter of good and bad mental health, it has demonstrated over many years that it cannot cure any mental problems.

In fact, psychiatry invents the very problems that it then fraudulently claims to handle. Mental “disorders” are voted into and out of existence based on factors that have nothing to do with medicine. Psychiatry admits that it has not proven the cause or source of a single “mental illness;” the DSM is simply a list of symptoms.

Recommendations

The DSM should be removed from use in all government agencies, departments and other bodies including criminal, educational and justice systems. None of the mental disorders in the DSM should be eligible for insurance coverage because they have no scientific, physical validation. Provide funding and insurance coverage only for proven, workable treatments that verifiably and dramatically improve or cure mental health problems.

Contact your local, state and federal officials and representatives to express your viewpoints about this.

Qelbree, The Newest ADHD Drug

Monday, June 21st, 2021

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a new drug April 2, 2021 for treatment of the fraudulent “disease” Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in children ages 6 to 17.

Like many other psychiatric drugs, this one also carries an FDA warning:”Qelbree may increase suicidal thoughts and actions in some children with ADHD, especially within the first few months of treatment or when the dose is changed.”

Qelbree (generic viloxazine hydrochloride) is a non-stimulant drug, although it is a Selective Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitor (sNRI), which means that it is really an antidepressant and is similar in operation to other ADHD drugs such as Strattera. The bottom line is that this class of drugs messes with neurotransmitters in the brain, and taking them is playing Russian Roulette with your brain.

Qelbree is an inhibitor of several Cytochrome P450 enzymes, which may intensify the drug’s side effects especially in combination with certain other drugs.

And again, like other similar psychiatric drugs, “The mechanism of action of viloxazine in the treatment of ADHD is unclear.

There is no valid ADHD clinical test for children. There is no valid ADHD clinical test for adults. The ADHD diagnosis does not identify a genuine biological or psychological disorder. The diagnosis is simply a list of behaviors that may appear disruptive or inappropriate, and is essentially just an opinion.

No one denies that people can have difficult problems in their lives, that at times they can be mentally unstable, subject to unreasonable depression, anxiety or panic. Mental health care is therefore both valid and necessary.
However, the emphasis must be on workable mental healing methods that improve and strengthen individuals and thereby society by restoring people to personal strength, ability, competence, confidence, stability, responsibility and spiritual well-being. Psychiatric drugs and psychiatric treatments are not workable.

ADHD Newborn

What’s Wrong with U.S. Healthcare

Monday, April 19th, 2021

Reference: “What’s Wrong with U.S. Healthcare and how to Fix it: A Systematic Approach to Improved Healthcare at Lower Cost”
by Les Ruthven, Ph.D.
November 16, 2020
Available on Amazon

“Unfortunately one must be especially skeptical of all pharmaceutical industry sponsored health research for drugs and also for many medical devises, the latter especially mental health problems.”

Dr. Ruthven is a psychologist specializing in clinical neuropsychology and behavioral health management. He believes that a better quality of healthcare occurs when patients have information they can apply to resolving their own health problems. Much of this book is an examination of standard of care psychiatric practices that do not appear to meet necessary scientific standards of proof.

He says, “I can think of no better way to achieve affordable healthcare than by insisting that a particular drug or therapy is only reimbursable if the treatment has been proven to be substantially effective (and safe) by sound research and not just because practitioners believe the treatment is effective or that the treatment is FDA approved.”

Of course, CCHR has been documenting the facts about psychiatry, psychiatric drugs and other harmful psychiatric treatments for over 50 years, and can state with certainty that:

1. psychiatric “disorders” are not medical diseases;
2. psychiatrists deal exclusively with mental “disorders,” not proven diseases;
3. psychiatry has never established the cause of any “mental disorders”;
4. the theory that mental disorders derive from a “chemical imbalance” in the brain is unproven opinion, not fact;
5. the brain is not the real cause of life’s problems.

CCHR’s work will only be complete when psychiatry’s fraudulent practices are eliminated and it is held accountable for its harmful treatments and human rights violations.

Find out more here: http://www.CCHRSTL.org/

http://www.cchrstl.org/

What Exactly is Mental Health?

Monday, March 22nd, 2021

We speak and write often about mental trauma, and how and why psychiatry is not the answer to good mental health care. But we rarely address exactly what mental health is. There are continuous loads of social commentary about mental health without even clearly defining what is good mental health.

We’ll try to remedy that. There are a number of useful approaches to defining good mental health. As usual with most English terms, there are multiple definitions; but we can certainly isolate some common attributes and characteristics. One can delineate both positive and negative characteristics; one can list contributing factors toward good mental health, and alternatively one can list contributing factors toward bad mental health.

WHO Says What is Mental Health

The World Health Organization (WHO) describes mental health as: “a state of well-being in which the individual realizes his or her abilities, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to make a contribution to his or her community.”

For a practical approach, this is a good start.

Additional Approaches to What is Mental Health

We might also call good mental health an absence of psychoses, neuroses, compulsions, repressions, and psychosomatic ills; leading to a state of mental well-being.

The Wales Mental Health in Primary Care Network has an interesting viewpoint of good mental health:
“The central role of relationships in health and wellbeing suggests that relationships set the initial conditions and the simple values that lead to the emergence of health and wellbeing outcomes. Relationships that are positive between people and within organisations are the simple small inputs that lead to the much bigger output of improved outcomes and health gain. … The gold standard for mental health and wellbeing is the gold standard for caring relationships.”

Green Mental Health Care

Green Mental Health Care is based on the preservation and treatment of the mind and body (for they are not separate functions) using non-toxic, non-addictive, and non-invasive strategies that produces good mental health. Green Mental Health Care has not only proven to be superior in patient outcomes than any other treatment method, including the use of psychiatric drugs, but it achieves the patient’s health goals at a fraction of the cost while saving them from the life-threatening health risks associated with psychiatric drugs.”

What is a Cure?

We generally take cure to mean the elimination of some unwanted condition with some effective treatment. The primary purpose of any mental health treatment must be the therapeutic care and treatment of individuals who are suffering emotional disturbance, leading to a cure. The only effective measure of this treatment must be “patients recovering and being sent, sane, back into society as productive individuals.” This, we would call a cure. Psychiatry produces no cures, which they readily admit.

“We do not know the causes [of any mental illness]. We don’t have the methods of ‘curing’ these illnesses yet.” [Dr. Rex Cowdry, psychiatrist and director of National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) in 1995]
“The time when psychiatrists considered that they could cure the mentally ill is gone. In the future the mentally ill have to learn to live with their illness.” [Norman Satorius, president of the World Psychiatric Association in 1994]

The Effects of Stress

According to top experts, the majority of people having mental problems are actually suffering from non-psychiatric disorders, which can cause emotional stress. We might characterize mental stress as inorganic or organic. Organic conditions are characterized by physical and biochemical indicators, while inorganic conditions manifest only as distressing experiences or undesirable behavior. In either case, an underlying cause would be some form of stress.

An individual’s health level, sanity level, activity level and ambition level are all monitored by their own concept of the dangerousness of their environment. You are as successful as you adjust your environment to yourself, rather than the environment enforcing itself on you which produces stress.

Human Rights and Mental Health

Mental health refers to psychological, social, behavioral, and emotional aspects of health.

The Right to Mental Health is an important human rights issue.

“The right to health contains both freedoms and entitlements. Freedoms include the right to control one’s health, including the right to be free from non-consensual medical treatment and experimentation. Entitlements include the right to a system of health protection (i.e. health care and the underlying social determinants of health) that provides equality of opportunity for people to enjoy the highest attainable standard of health.”

The highest attainable standard of mental health care “includes the provision of equal and timely access to basic preventive, curative, rehabilitative health services and health education; regular screening programmes; appropriate treatment of prevalent diseases, illnesses, injuries and disabilities, preferably at community level; the provision of essential drugs; and appropriate mental health treatment and care.”

What is a Good Patient Outcome?

When we think about the outcomes of mental health care, we can think in terms that are important to the patient, or alternatively in terms that are important to others such as family, teachers, insurance companies, or the attending medical professionals.

A good patient outcome is one that leads toward optimum survival for the patient and all their associations.

The Highest Attainable Standard of Mental Health

It should be obvious by now that the term “mental health” has multiple effective meanings. It should also be obvious that psychiatry is not engaged in good mental health care, so the highest attainable standard of mental health would certainly eliminate psychiatric involvement.

The Bottom Line? Pick one or more of the above standards for good mental health and apply it to your own situations and interests; use them to guide your activities toward a higher standard. After all, good mental health is not a fixed state; one can always aspire and work toward a better state.

The Complete Removal of Psychosis
The Complete Removal of Psychosis