Posts Tagged ‘Artists’

Chris Cornell, Another Failed Product of Psychiatric Drugs

Thursday, May 25th, 2017

Chris Cornell, a musician who committed suicide May 18, was apparently taking Ativan, a psychotropic drug which has known side effects of violence and suicide.

“…Cornell was a recovering addict with a prescription for the anti-anxiety medication Ativan and that he may have taken a bigger than recommended dosage.”

Ativan (generic lorazepam) is a highly addictive benzodiazepine anti-anxiety drug, and is known to cause violence and suicide either during use or after withdrawal. A typical dose is 1 to 3 milligrams orally 2 to 3 times per day, typically costing around $10 per 1 milligram tablet. It takes about two hours to feel the drug’s full effects, and it typically takes 10 to 20 hours for the drug to leave a person’s system.

Lorazepam as Ativan was first introduced in the U.S. by Wyeth Pharmaceuticals in 1977. Many of the so-called “beneficial effects” of the drug are considered “adverse effects” when they occur unwanted, such as its sedative effect, muscle relaxant effect, and amnesiac effect. These side effects are dose-dependent, meaning they get more pronounced the higher the dose. Other significant side effects are confusion, hostility, aggression, agitation, and suicidal behavior. Physical addiction characterized by withdrawal symptoms occurs in about one-third of individuals who are treated for longer than four weeks, although withdrawal symptoms can occur after taking therapeutic doses of Ativan for as little as one week. If treatment is continued longer than four to six months, tolerance develops and the dosage must be increased to get the same effects.

Signs of overdose can include confusion, hostility, aggression, suicidal behavior, drowsiness, hypnotic state, coma, cardiovascular depression, respiratory depression, and death. 810 drugs, and alcohol, are known to interact with lorazepam. Taking larger amounts of Ativan than prescribed, taking the drug more often than prescribed and taking the drug for longer than prescribed are considered abuse. Most commonly, overdoses occur when Ativan is taken in combination with alcohol or other drugs. Fifty thousand people went to the emergency room in 2011 due to lorazepam complications. Twenty-seven million prescriptions for lorazepam were written in 2011.

While this drug is used to treat anxiety, it doesn’t really do anything for the anxiety itself; it is primarily taken for its sedative side effect. The “side effects” are really the actual drug effects.

This great musician, and many other artists who committed suicide while taking psychiatric drugs, were offered “help” that was only betrayal. This psychiatric assault on artists of every genre has only increased, as the psychiatric industry peddles its array of deadly addictive psychotropic drugs for profit only. Click here for more information about psychiatry harming artists and ruining creativity.

Whitney Houston and Xanax

Sunday, February 12th, 2012

According to Fox News, prescription drugs had been found in the Beverly Hills Hilton hotel room where Houston’s lifeless body was discovered Saturday afternoon just hours before a huge Grammy party she was to attend.

Police discovered a half dozen bottles of medication in Whitney Houston’s room, TMZ reported, adding that family members said Houston had been taking the prescription drug Xanax, which is often used to treat anxiety.

When combined with alcohol, Xanax can cause drowsiness. Houston was reportedly found in her bathtub — TMZ says her head was underwater — and could not be revived by paramedics after being removed from the tub.

No alcohol was found in the preliminary sweep of Houston’s room, TMZ reports, but there were multiple reports that Houston had been drinking with friends the night before at the hotel.

Xanax

The anti-anxiety drug Xanax (generic alprazolam), also called a minor tranquilizer, benzodiazepine, or sedative hypnotic, is associated with physical dependence. Addiction can occur after 14 days of regular use. Side effects can include violence, excessive sedation, decreased attention, and amnesia. After a person stops taking Xanax, it takes the brain six to eighteen months to recover. Drug experts say that Xanax is more addictive than most illegal drugs, including cocaine or heroin, and once someone is hooked, getting off it can be a tortuous and even deadly experience.

Not Xanax

Focusing on the drug, evil as it is, hides the real problem.

Recognize that the real problem is that psychiatrists fraudulently diagnose life’s problems and anxieties as an “illness”, and stigmatize unwanted behavior as  “diseases.” Psychiatry’s stigmatizing labels, programs and treatments are harmful junk science; their diagnoses of “mental disorders” are a hoax – unscientific, fraudulent and harmful.

Some doctor prescribed the Xanax and is not being held accountable.

Not a Fluke

Psychiatry has a long history of attacking and harming artists.

Artists are the individuals who dream our future and create the realities of tomorrow. It is the artist who lifts the spirit, makes us laugh and cry and can even shape the spiritual future of our culture. It is artists who make life. Artists are cherished human assets the world over.

Unfortunately, in many cases, they are assets we have lost too soon – losses that have left us poorer. In recent decades we have all mourned the untimely deaths of great artists who enriched our lives, yet left before their work was done. Luminaries of literature, the screen, the theater and the concert stage, names such as Ernest Hemingway, France’s great writer Antonin Artaud, jazz singer Billie Holiday, Judy Garland, Marilyn Monroe, Vivien Leigh, Kurt Cobain, Michael Hutchence, Phil Hartman and many, many more. And now, Whitney Houston.

Faced with even this partial list, it would be easy to form the impression that the lives of artists are unavoidably tumultuous and that for some, the pressures of success bring demands too great to be borne. It would also be easy to believe that to be a successful artist you must be neurotic or some sort of tragic figure.

None of this is true.

In each of the cases above, hidden influences worked to ensure the deadly outcome. The truth is, each of these great artists and many of the others who have left us were offered “help.” Instead they were betrayed and placed on a path which assured their destruction.

This betrayal came through the direct or indirect influence of psychiatrists or psychologists, who claimed they would help but were, in effect, a destructive influence that left these artists dreadfully damaged – or dead – after their foundations of strength and certainty were torn away.

Today there is an added urgency that this message be heard and understood, for the assault upon artists of every genre has only increased in both volume and efficiency. The weapons now include an array of deadly drugs that masquerade as therapeutic cures, just as the prefrontal lobotomy once did. In Hollywood, the mecca of the entertainment industry, those mind-altering and addictive psychotropic drugs are exacting too high a cost in creative lives.

Find out more about artists harmed by psychiatry by clicking here.