United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

The United Nations (U.N.) has published their master plan for world government: Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

There are 91 Declarations, and 17 Goals. Here are some.

Declaration 26. To promote physical and mental health and well-being, and to extend life expectancy for all, we must achieve universal health coverage and access to quality health care. No one must be left behind. We commit to accelerating the progress made to date in reducing newborn, child and maternal mortality by ending all such preventable deaths before 2030. We are committed to ensuring universal access to sexual and reproductive health-care services, including for family planning, information and education. We will equally accelerate the pace of progress made in fighting malaria, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, hepatitis, Ebola and other communicable diseases and epidemics, including by addressing growing anti-microbial resistance and the problem of unattended diseases affecting developing countries. We are committed to the prevention and treatment of non-communicable diseases, including behavioural, developmental and neurological disorders, which constitute a major challenge for sustainable development.

Goal 3.4. By 2030, reduce by one third premature mortality from non-communicable diseases through prevention and treatment and promote mental health and well-being.

These are laudable goals.

We fear, however, that any goals given to the current mental health care industry for implementation would only pervert the good purpose and cause more suffering than actual help.

They have already tried, more than once, to push heavy drug use on children and teens while rolling out “screening” programs that refer kids to psychiatric and psychological treatment.

Refusing to cooperate with such grand plans might seem U.N.American. We’re only saying, there might be a significant difference between the plans and the implementation.

Psychiatry is the epitome of coercive care. For almost 50 years, psychiatry has promoted its theory that the only “treatment” for severe mental “illness” is neuroleptic drugs. However, this idea rests on a fault line. The truth is that not only is the drugging of severely mentally disturbed patients unnecessary–and expensive, thus profitable–it causes brain- and life-damaging side effects.

The simple truth is that there are workable alternatives to psychiatry’s mind-, brain- and body-damaging treatments. With this U.N. “sustainability” effort, there will be more calls for mandatory mental illness screening for adults and children everywhere. We urge all who have an interest in preserving the mental health and freedom of their families and communities to FIND OUT and FIGHT BACK. Something must be done to establish real help for those who need it.

Click here for more information about alternatives to psychiatric abuse.

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