Federal Funds for Learning Disorders

IDEA – The Source of Federal Funds for Learning Disorders

Special Education under the Individuals with Disabilities in Education Act (IDEA) has become a gravy train for psychiatrists and psychologists diagnosing children with ADHD [Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder] or “learning disorders” and hooking these kids on drugs.

Of the approximate $50 billion spent annually on Special Education, an estimated $29 billion covers education for subjective “mental disorders,” when the law was originally intended for children with physical handicaps such as autism, speech impediments, blindness or other physical disabilities.

Underlying the coerced drugging of children is the definition of “disability” under Special Education law. The primary purpose of IDEA, which covers Special Education, was to provide a free and appropriate education for children with hearing, sight, speech and other physical handicaps. However, the term “handicapped” was changed to “learning disabled,” and children who fidget in class, interrupt their teachers, or simply fall behind academically were classified as “disabled.”

In order to receive federal funds under the Individuals with Disabilities in Education Act, the “Prohibition on Mandatory Medication Amendment,” was signed into law by President Bush in 2004 and requires schools to implement policies that prohibit schoolchildren being forced onto psychiatric drugs as a requisite for their education: “The State educational agency shall prohibit State and local educational agency personnel from requiring a child to obtain a prescription for a substance covered by the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 801 et seq.) as a condition of attending school, receiving an evaluation under subsection (a) or (c) of section 614, or receiving services under this title.” [Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004]

Funding for learning disabilities in Missouri is documented in Missouri Revised Statutes (RSMo), Chapter 162, Section 700 “Special educational services, …” [http://www.moga.mo.gov/statutes/c100-199/1620000700.htm]

RSMo 162.675 defines “Children with disabilities” or “handicapped children” as “children under the age of twenty-one years who have not completed an approved high school program and who, because of mental, physical, emotional or learning problems, require special educational services.”

Note, however, that RSMo 162.700 denies children needing extra help the most beneficial service by specifying that “remedial reading programs are not a special education service.”

See also RSMo 162.670 “School Districts – Statement of Policy” [http://www.moga.mo.gov/statutes/c100-199/1620000670.htm] which ties Missouri educational policy to the provisions of IDEA.

It is difficult to determine an exact dollar amount per child; there are a number of formulas governing federal funds given to states for many different programs, which vary year by year based on the federal budget and the state. See also the Wikipedia article on IDEA at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Individuals_with_Disabilities_Education_Act.

As an example, see this link [http://www.rense.com/general4/addd.htm] for an article called “How Schools Are Making Big Money On ‘ADD/ADHD’.”

Why is this such an issue?

Well, for example, in the news this week is an article about “ADHD-drug abuse popular on Oregon campuses.” The article makes the point that “Adderall and its counterparts, including Ritalin and the over-the-counter Vivarin, are growing in popularity among students who don’t have ADHD but use the medications as study tools to stay awake and alert during prolonged cram sessions.”

One wonders if these college students learned to use/abuse ADHD drugs in elementary or high school. According to this article, various ADHD drugs are readily available with or without a prescription. One student said, “So many kids have Adderall prescriptions. Doctors just give it away like it’s candy or something. A lot of kids just will give it away for free.”

The drugging of children for ADHD is an epidemic. More than 5 million U.S. children, or 9.5 percent, were diagnosed with ADHD as of 2007. About 2.8 million had received a prescription for a stimulant medication in 2008.

The ADHD diagnosis does not identify a genuine biological or psychological disorder. The diagnosis, from the 2000 edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, is simply a list of behaviors that may appear disruptive or inappropriate.

The prevalence of this fraudulent diagnosis then increases the availability of the drugs, which are addictive and have harmful side effects, and as we see here are abused by others.

For more information about the side effects of psychiatric drugs, go to http://www.cchrstl.org/sideeffects.shtml.

Contact your schools and your local, state and federal officials and let them know what you think about this.

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