Involuntary Commitment Records in Missouri are No Longer Confidential

July 22nd, 2015

Involuntary Commitment  Records in Missouri are No Longer Confidential

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon signed into law Senate Bill 426 on July 13 which expands the conditions under which confidential mental health care records can be released.

Mental health care facilities that hold patients who have been civilly committed, either voluntarily or involuntarily, can now disclose information about patient medications and other medical records “to individuals designated by the department of mental health as community mental health liaisons for the purpose of coordination of care and services.”

We expect that this means the government wants to follow these patients back into the community when they are released so that they can be monitored as continuing to take their prescribed psychiatric drugs.

As if commitment is not an abusive human rights violation in itself! Now the government wants to make sure the abuse continues for the rest of the person’s life.

“The fact that psychiatric imprisonment is called ‘civil commitment’ is, of course, simply part of the linguistic deception characteristic of the mental–health system. Since civil commitment results in the loss of liberty, and subjects the victim to health hazards at the hands of medical criminals whose ostensible healing function is legitimized by the state, it entails far greater deprivation of rights than does incarceration in prison, a penalty carefully circumscribed by constitutional guarantees and judicial safeguards.”
(Dr. Thomas Szasz, M.D., late Professor of Psychiatry Emeritus)

With health care eating up vast amounts of our national budget, the first spending cut to make is the cost of “treating” people who prefer not to be mentally treated. Involuntary commitment laws hike federal, state, county, city and private health care costs under the strange circumstance of a patient–recipient who cannot say no.

CCHR recommends that citizens execute a Living Will, or Letter of Protection from Psychiatric Incarceration and/or Treatment, which directs that psychiatric incarceration, hospitalization, treatment or procedures not be imposed on you.

Human Rights Concerns with the Helping Families in Mental Health Crisis Act of 2015

July 18th, 2015

Human Rights Concerns with the Helping Families in Mental Health Crisis Act of 2015

Congressional Rep. Tim Murphy (R., PA) originally introduced the Helping Families in Mental Health Crisis Act (H.R.3717) in 2013. Not to be outdone by H.R.6 the 21st Century Cures Act, he has reintroduced it to this year’s Congress as H.R.2646 the Helping Families in Mental Health Crisis Act of 2015.

Rep. Murphy is a psychologist, and a staunch supporter of “mental health care” as defined by the psychiatric and psychological industries; not to mention the pharmaceutical and insurance industries.

Official Title of the Act: “To make available needed psychiatric, psychological, and supportive services for individuals with mental illness and families in mental health crisis, and for other purposes.”

The Act creates a new position in the Department of Health and Human Services – an official to be known as the Assistant Secretary for Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders. (As if we need another bureaucracy in the psych industry.)

The Act creates more funding for psych-based “treatments.”

The Act expands the bureaucracy surrounding “parity in mental health and substance use disorder benefits” under Medicare and Medicaid.

The Act provides for grants in early childhood intervention and treatment programs, and specialized preschool and elementary school programs.

The Act provides for grants in “Assisted Outpatient Treatment” programs.

The Act requires states to have a law that enforces court-ordered involuntary mental health treatment for the “mentally disabled” if the state want to receive certain federal funding.

The Act expands mental health training for primary care physicians.

This isn’t even half of the proposed legislation.

The Act spends lots more money on “suicide prevention” all up and down the entire educational chain, from elementary school through college.

The Act establishes an entirely new bureaucracy called the “Interagency Serious Mental Illness Coordinating Committee.”

Of course, the Act also expands the availability of and insurance coverage for psychiatric prescription drugs, as well as lifting limits on Medicare payments for inpatient psychiatric hospital services.

The Act expands the Community Mental Health Care programs.

The Act increases funding for the National Institute of Mental Health.

And even that’s not all the Act does to strengthen the already fraudulent and abusive psychiatric mental health industry.

CCHR Supporters should really consider contacting their Congressmen to express their opinions about this affront to rationality.

Let us know when you contact your Congressmen about this, and any response you may receive.

21st Century Cures Act

July 12th, 2015

21st Century Cures Act

H.R.6, the 21st Century Cures Act, is rushing through Congress now. This bill amends the Public Health Service Act to reauthorize the National Institutes of Health (NIH) budget, and to make some major changes in the NIH, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Medicare, the Controlled Substances Import and Export Act, and the Department of Health and Human Services.

We are pretty sure that not all of these changes are going to be benign. We invite you to read the Act and read the rebuttal, decide for yourself, and contact your Congressmen now with your personal opinions.

Warning: the text of the Act is difficult to read in the context of the laws it is proposing to change, since it does not print the revisions in line of the original law, as in proposed Missouri legislation for example, but instead just prints the text being removed and the text being inserted.

Here are some salient quotes from the rebuttal:

“The Act is a give-away to the pharmaceutical industry, removing many of the safety mechanisms in place that are supposed to keep the public protected from unsafe drugs and medical devices.”

“The 21st Century Cures Act will diminish another bedrock of modern medicine – informed consent.”

“But if pharmaceuticals are no longer required to have evidence that they improve health outcomes, how are they any better than snake oils? One only needs to look as far as the recent history of psychiatry to see that the line between snake oils and ‘evidence based medicine’ is already woefully thin.”

“The 21st Century Cures Act diminishes the rocks on which modern medicine are based – informed consent, individual body autonomy, the Hippocratic Oath, and basing medicine on scientific evidence.”

Obviously we are not diagnosing or recommending treatments here. We want to alert you to this Congressional action, and make sure you are informed so that you can exercise your own judgment. While sections of this proposed legislation are likely useful, there are other sections that may be damaging in the long term and may be passed into law in haste.

Here is an example of a section called out in the rebuttal (“With the passage of the 21st Century Cures Act, drugs will be rushed to market with little testing required.”):

“SEC. 2022. Accelerated approval development plan. In the case of a drug that the Secretary determines may be eligible for accelerated approval in accordance with subsection (c), the sponsor of such drug may request, at any time after the submission of an application for the investigation of the drug under section 505(i) of this Act or section 351(a)(3) of the Public Health Service Act, that the Secretary agree to an accelerated approval development plan described in paragraph (2).”

This refers to paragraph (2) which describes the use of a “surrogate endpoint” in an accelerated approval development plan. The term “surrogate endpoint” means a marker, such as a laboratory measurement, radiographic image, physical sign, or other measure, that is not itself a direct measurement of clinical benefit. So a result of this could be that clinical trials no longer measure the clinical benefit of a new drug on the fast track to approval, just unspecified changes in various measurements that may, or may not, be beneficial to the patient. This is the kind of change that causes us to question the haste and wisdom of this proposed Act.

Let us know when you contact your Congressmen about this, and any response you may receive.

And read what we have to say about Informed Consent.

The Havering Crowd

July 3rd, 2015

The Havering Crowd

haver – verb
gerund or present participle: havering
[Scottish] talk foolishly; babble.
“Tom havered on.”
[British] act in a vacillating or indecisive manner.
“Most people giggle at their havering and indecision.”

Psychiatry and psychology employ havering as a method of professional communication. Otherwise known as “psychobabble,” this speech mechanism can put those unaware of its nature in a confused state.

psychobabble – noun
a form of speech or writing that uses psychological jargon, buzzwords, and esoteric language to create an impression of truth or plausibility

Googling the word “psychobabble” returns 456,000 results. It’s a popular pastime.

The word “psychobabble” came into popular use after the 1977 publication of Psychobabble: Fast Talk and Quick Cure in the Era of Feeling by R. D. Rosen, leading to another interesting definition: jargon speech that is heavily based on experience and emotion instead of well-known science.

Here is an example: bipolar. Yes, the word “bipolar” is a classic example of psychobabble, because when people claim they are bipolar they’re really saying that they are just moody. Saying you’re bipolar abdicates all responsibility for the control of your emotions.

Scanning the brains of children and adolescents labeled with ADHD is one of the latest psychobabble ideas being used in an attempt to bring some credibility to this fraudulent diagnosis, demonstrating that psychiatrists are still looking for an answer to justify the widespread drugging of children and adolescents.

Of course, the biggest psychobabble scam is the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). And if you chewed on a page from the DSM while reciting one of its fraudulent diagnoses, you could be accused of havering your babble and eating it, too.

The Name Game, Latuda

June 24th, 2015

The Name Game, Latuda

Latuda, Latuda, bo-buda
Banana-fana-fo-fuda
Fee-fi-mo-muda
Latuda

One might as well be talking gibberish, since Latuda does not make any sense. Unless you consider that it makes a lot of cents.

We recently saw a commercial on TV for Latuda (generic name lurasidone HCL), lauding its use for bipolar depression.

It’s another psychiatric drug, originally promoted for the symptoms called schizophrenia, and lately for bipolar depression. It’s similar to risperidone or olanzapine, an atypical anti-psychotic drug that alters the levels of serotonin and dopamine in the brain. The chemical class is called “benzisothiazol derivative.”

It was developed by Sumitomo Dainippan Pharma and marketed in the U.S. by Sunovian Pharmaceuticals.

The Latuda manufacturer’s website has this to say about it, “It’s not known exactly how Latuda works, and the precise way antipsychotics work is also unknown.”

Manufacturer warnings include, “Increased mortality rate in elderly patients … and suicidal thoughts and behaviors.”

867 other drugs are known to interact with it.

The side effects are similar to all other antipsychotics, and could be increased in intensity if the user drinks grapefruit juice with it.

An average dose is estimated to cost about $5,000 per year.

It was not tested in published clinical trials lasting longer than 6 weeks; and one of its trials failed to show any improvement at all.

At this point, it is definitely looking more like banana-fana than anything else. One might as well eat some bananas instead, it would be a whole lot healthier and likely just as effective.

We’re making fun of the psych drug, not the symptoms. People certainly can have mental trauma for which they might need help. We’re just saying, the psych drug is not help; it is, rather, harm.

Psychiatry is a harmful pseudo-science; they know it, they admit it. Don’t swallow it.

Go here for more information. Find Out! Fight Back!

Antidepressants kill over 500.000 people annually

June 21st, 2015

Antidepressants kill over 500.000 people annually

Antidepressants kill over 500.000 people annually. Click link to play YouTube video (4 minutes). A new study shows psychiatric drugs kill over half a million Americans and Europeans every year who are over 65. Professor Peter Gøtzsche claims efficacy trials underestimate the harmful effects of antidepressants, which in fact cause up to 15 time more suicides than reported by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Click here for the Truth About psychiatric Drugs.

Huffington Post Admits Mental Disorders Are Not Medical Conditions

June 14th, 2015

Huffington Post Admits Mental Disorders Are Not Medical Conditions

A leading psychiatrist featured in the Huffington Post just admitted what CCHR has said for decades — mental disorders are not medical conditions.

Allen Frances, professor emeritus at Duke University and chairman of the DSM-IV task force, had this to say, “Those of us who worked on DSM IV learned first-hand and painfully the limitations of the written word and how it can be tortured and twisted in damaging daily usage, especially when there is a profit to be had. … ‘Mental illness’ is terribly misleading because the ‘mental disorders’ we diagnose are no more than descriptions of what clinicians observe people do or say, not at all well established diseases.”

Kelly Patricia O’Meara further expounds on this:

“Slowly, ever so slowly, the scientific community finally is acknowledging what the Citizens Commission on Human Rights (CCHR), a mental health watchdog, has been exposing since 1969—that psychiatric disorders are not verifiable medical conditions, that the diagnosis is based solely on a checklist of behaviors, and that the drug ‘treatments’ have serious, life-threatening effects.”

While the number of psychiatrists worldwide declined 15% between 2005 and 2011, the number of psychiatrists in the U.S. rose 180% from 1975 to 2012. The global sales of antidepressants and antipsychotics rose 3% from 2006 to 2013; while the U.S. sales of these harmful drugs increased 5% from 2006 to 2012. U.S. sales of ADHD drugs rose 197% from 2006 to 2012. In 2011, 100,000 people in the U.S. were electro-shocked. In 2014, the U.S. Veterans Administration mental health budget was nearly $7 Billion.

It isn’t over. The total number of children and adults taking ADHD drugs rose from 6.7 million in 2006 to 10.2 million in 2013. The total number of Americans on all psychiatric drugs rose 19% from 2005 to 2013.

We’re effectively destroying an entire generation with harmful and addictive psychotropic drugs.

Contact your local, state and federal officials and representatives, and let them know what you think about this. Find Out! Fight Back!

Missouri Mental Health Budget Out Of Control

June 4th, 2015

Missouri Mental Health Budget Out Of Control

Missouri’s budget for the coming year is contained in a series of House Bills (HBs), passed by the end of the legislative session and forwarded to Governor Nixon for his approval.

Missouri State Senator David Sater (Republican-District 29) had this to say in the Branson Tri-Lakes News on May 6, 2015: “This budget will also begin to contain the ever-growing Departments of Mental Health, Health and Senior Services and Social Services in HBs 10 and 11. These departments spend huge a portion of the state budget and have done so uncontrollably and unsupervised for years, and they continue to ask for more money year after year. Almost every extra dollar in revenue we have goes to HBs 10 and 11 and there is nothing left over to fulfill our commitments to educating our kids or ensuring we have safe roads and infrastructure.”

The Department of Mental Health has a budget for the coming year of $1,836,521,148. Health and Senior Services budget is $1,253,241,755; the Department of Social Services budget is $8,609,187,275.

MO DMH Budgets

While the legislative session is over for the year, it is important for all Missouri citizens to make their viewpoints known to their state representatives and senators, and to express their concern over the out-of-control Department of Mental Health budget. And thank Senator Sater for his understanding.

We think it is time for the Missouri legislature to call psychiatry and psychology for what it is — A failed pseudo science with no basis in fact, a pseudo science that harms its recipients and lines the pocketbooks of its practitioners.

Giving more tax dollars to the Department of Mental Health merely perpetuates the cycle of state tax largesse. Curtailing and cutting the budget will force the Department of Mental Health to reduce their costs, thereby forcing useless and unnecessary state institutions either to improve their services or close shop.

A budget cut will force the Department of Mental Health to re-evaluate all citizens held in state custody and thus force the Department to recommend release of those who are no longer deemed a threat to the body politic thus saving the state more money. It is an obvious fact that the more patients, residents and clients the Department must care for, the more tax money they can ask for.

Those citizens who are no longer deemed a threat need to be unconditionally released. This will allow these citizens to return to their families and to make the readjustment back into a tax paying citizen.

Increasing the Department of Mental Health’s budget covers expensive, addictive and harmful psychiatric drugs as necessary medical costs. For example, to date there have been 72 warnings against antipsychotics issued by regulators in eight countries.

The state is not primarily responsible for a person’s entire life, thus the Department of Mental Health is not responsible for a citizen’s entire life. Some citizens need to be cared for but the primary responsibility lies first with the individual, then his family, then his religious affiliation, then the state government and finally the federal government.

The Department of Mental Health is an easy place to cut spending in the long, difficult effort to save our health-care system, as the citizens of this state have long used the Department of Mental health as an emergency health care provider. The unprecedented use of Missouri’s Mental Health psychiatric facilities as emergency health care has hidden a long overlooked problem that the state’s poorer citizens are enduring.

It may be time to consider the idea of folding the Department of Mental Health into the Department of Health and Senior Services; to restructure the Department of Mental Health and allow the new system to provide emergency medical services to this state’s poorer citizens.

The Department of Mental Health’s motto should be “We care for those who cannot care for themselves”; not “We want to care for all”. The currently available psychiatric “treatments” are not care, they are fraudulent and abusive.

Click here for more information about psychiatric fraud.

Legislative Elimination of Harmful Psychiatric Practices

May 28th, 2015

Legislative Elimination of Harmful Psychiatric Practices

FLORIDA

There is a law on the books in Florida that if enforced would end harmful psychiatric practices there. It makes illegal all unscientific, fraudulent and unproven healthcare treatments. [Florida Statutes 456.072 (1)(a)]

“456.072?Grounds for discipline; penalties; enforcement.—
(1)?The following acts shall constitute grounds for which the disciplinary actions specified in subsection (2) may be taken:
(a)?Making misleading, deceptive, or fraudulent representations in or related to the practice of the licensee’s profession.”

However, there is a second law on the Florida books which states that if the practitioner uses treatments “generally accepted” by his peers then it is OK. This opens the door to the practitioner having to use the treatments his peers “generally accept” or be subject to administrative discipline and malpractice laws. [Florida Statutes 766.102 (1)]

“766.102?Medical negligence; standards of recovery; expert witness.—
(1)?In any action for recovery of damages based on the death or personal injury of any person in which it is alleged that such death or injury resulted from the negligence of a health care provider as defined in s. 766.202(4), the claimant shall have the burden of proving by the greater weight of evidence that the alleged actions of the health care provider represented a breach of the prevailing professional standard of care for that health care provider. The prevailing professional standard of care for a given health care provider shall be that level of care, skill, and treatment which, in light of all relevant surrounding circumstances, is recognized as acceptable and appropriate by reasonably prudent similar health care providers.”

To confuse matters even more, there is a third law on the Florida books that makes it illegal for a doctor to prescribe controlled substances like narcotics and psychiatric drugs for pain without a full and complete physical exam, full history obtained and imaging like MRI, CAT Scans, drug tests, etc. And then only after other less or non harmful therapies have been attempted can powerful narcotics and powerful tranquilizers be prescribed on an ongoing basis for physical pain. [Florida Statutes 458.331(1)(t)1]

“458.331?Grounds for disciplinary action; action by the board and department.—
(1)?The following acts constitute grounds for denial of a license or disciplinary action … (t)?Notwithstanding s. 456.072(2) but as specified in s. 456.50(2):
1.?Committing medical malpractice as defined in s. 456.50. The board shall give great weight to the provisions of s. 766.102 when enforcing this paragraph.”

This third law was used to bust countless pill-mill doctors. They had their licenses suspended, revoked, and were charged and convicted in criminal courts.

But the psychs are “exempt” from this law. Why? Because psychiatric “treatments” such as psychiatric drugs are the prevailing standard of care.

MISSOURI

In Missouri, these are some Statutes regarding standard of care and related topics:

[197.080.1 2.(3)(b) Department of Health and Senior Services] “A departmental investigation of a complaint shall be focused on the specific regulatory standard and departmental written interpretive guidance and publicly available professionally recognized standard of care related to the complaint.”

[538.225. 1 Tort Actions Based on Improper Health Care] “In any action against a health care provider for damages for personal injury or death on account of the rendering of or failure to render health care services, the plaintiff or the plaintiff’s attorney shall file an affidavit with the court stating that he or she has obtained the written opinion of a legally qualified health care provider which states that the defendant health care provider failed to use such care as a reasonably prudent and careful health care provider would have under similar circumstances and that such failure to use such reasonable care directly caused or directly contributed to cause the damages claimed in the petition.

[334.100.2  Physicians and Surgeons–Therapists–Athletic Trainers–Health Care Providers] “The board may cause a complaint to be filed with the administrative hearing commission … against any holder of any certificate of registration or authority, permit or license required by this chapter … for any one or any combination of the following causes: … (4) Misconduct, fraud, misrepresentation, dishonesty, unethical conduct or unprofessional conduct in the performance of the functions or duties of any profession licensed or regulated by this chapter, including, but not limited to, the following: … (5) Any conduct or practice which is or might be harmful or dangerous to the mental or physical health of a patient … .”

CONCLUSIONS

Overall it seems that the pattern of these laws, while intending to protect citizens from physician malpractice, are not really effective in the case of harmful psychiatric practices, for these reasons:

1. The laws are subject to interpretation by lawyers and courts as to what is harmful;

2. The psychiatric industry itself controls its standard of care(using its own Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders [DSM] as its reference);

3. There is a built-in legal contradiction between the standard of care and medical malpractice — while one law defines malpractice, another law negates it with standard of care.

We see the solution as having to directly legislate against abusive, fraudulent and harmful psychiatric practices.

RECOMMENDATIONS

1. Concerned citizens and groups should relentlessly advocate legal and policy protections that force psychiatry to honor every individual’s right to be treated with humanity and respect and to recognize the inherent dignity of the person. These include protections from economic, sexual and other forms of exploitation.

2. Legal protections should be put in place to ensure that psychiatrists and psychologists are prohibited from violating the right of any person to exercise all civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights as recognized in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, and in other relevant instruments, such as the Body of Principles for the Protection of All Persons under Any Form of Detention or Imprisonment.

3. No person should ever be forced to undergo electric shock treatment, psychosurgery, coercive psychiatric treatment, or the enforced administration of mind-altering drugs. Parents cannot be forced or manipulated into permitting the drugging of their children by psychiatrists, other practitioners or school personnel. Governments should outlaw such abuses.

4. The responsible officials of regulatory agencies or their advisers must be held accountable and criminally charged for harm caused by psychiatric drugs and other psychiatric “treatment” if it is established that they knew, or should have known, of such harm either through clinical trial results, adverse reaction reports or broadly available public information.

5. Every individual who has been subject to such abuse should be helped to file a complaint to police and professional licensing bodies and have this abuse investigated and prosecuted. The individual should be helped also to obtain competent legal advice about filing a civil suit for damages against any offending psychiatrist and his or her hospital, associations and teaching institutions.

6. The United Nations, NGOs, human rights groups and concerned citizens should work together to create a new international human rights covenant that states sign and ratify to protect the right of all individuals from mind control and psychiatric abuse.

SIGN UP HERE.

Missouri Legislative Session Ended May 15

May 24th, 2015

Missouri Legislative Session Ended May 15

The 2015 Missouri legislative session ended on Friday, May 15.

The CCHR St. Louis role in all this has been to visit the Capitol each year early in the legislative session, with displays on mental health issues which are visited by various legislators. We also take around information packets and CCHR documentary DVDs to the legislators’ individual offices. We also keep our friends and allies who are actively lobbying at the Capitol informed on mental health. A number of legislators are also on the email list for the CCHR STL newsletter.

There were 9 psychiatric-related bills killed this year:

HB 40 – Requires peace officers to undergo a psychological evaluation every three years.
Died in committee.

HB 59 – Requires certain disclosures by a person applying for a position as a peace officer. Disclosure of any complaints or disciplinary actions, and if so, must undergo psychological evaluation.
Died in committee.

HB 382 – Requires school districts to establish comprehensive guidance and counseling programs for students attending school in the district. Mostly career guidance but does include counseling on “social and personal development,” which would be psych-based.
Majorly toned down as it went through committee, with the “social and personal development” stripped out of it and making the whole thing optional rather than mandatory. This passed through committee but never made it to the floor.

HB 525 – Specifies that drug courts must be established by every circuit court. These would send someone to (psych) treatment for drug offenses.
Passed through the first level of committee but not all the way through.

HB 764 – Establishes family intervention orders for the treatment of an individual who abuses chemical substances. Very intrusive, forces drug and alcohol users into psych treatment or else they lose their kids.
Hearing held but died in committee.

HB 867 – Establishes an online survey for screening medical students for depression.
This bill was gutted and completely rewritten in committee, finally stating only that medical schools must not prohibit students from participating in such a survey if someone does one, which of course was already true. In this very watered down form, the bill passed through the House and through committee in the Senate, but did not make it to the floor.

HB 1293 – Establishes policies and training for youth suicide awareness and prevention in schools, which would be psych based.
Passed through committee but did not make it to the floor.

SB 281 – Provides reimbursement for behavior assessment and intervention, for behavior management related to physical health conditions.
Passed through committee but never made it to the floor.

SB 328 – Requires school districts to adopt a policy on youth suicide awareness and prevention, and the Dept. of Elementary and Secondary Education to develop guidelines and training materials for it, and allows licensed educators to complete annual training on this as part of their continuing education requirements. This would all be psych oriented.
Passed both houses in different versions and went to a conference committee, but never came to a final vote.

We remind our supporters to participate in the legislative process by contacting your state senators and representatives to express your individual points of view. They do listen. You do have influence. Find out more about the Missouri legislative process at http://www.moga.mo.gov/.

[Many thanks to CCHR STL volunteer Carol Riess for this analysis.]