The Remedy of Tiredness

The fraudulent psychiatric billing bible, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), has quite a few entries related to one form or another of “sleep disorder,” many of which simply occur when a person is knocked out by some (legal or illegal) drug. And if a psychiatrist can’t find the real reason for a person’s troubled sleeping, they’ll just diagnose the catch-all “Unspecified sleep-wake disorder”. Psychiatrists assume that anything they can’t explain is a “mental illness.”

Of course, the psychiatric treatment of choice is a psychotropic drug, many of which have known side effects of difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep.

Lack of sufficient sleep, though, is only one cause of tiredness. There are quite a few medical and other reasons why someone might feel tired or exhausted, regardless of how much sleep they may or may not be getting. Clinical tests should be done by a competent, non-psychiatric health care professional, to determine if there are undiagnosed and untreated medical issues interfering with sleep. Oh, and the DSM also calls “sleep apnea” a psychiatric disorder, even though it may primarily be a medical or neurological issue.

Then there are a plethora of non-medical issues which might be causing tiredness. We’ll examine some, but not all of them, here.

We do not go deeply here into physical treatments; there are many good references on nutrition, exercise and body health which relate to the issues of sleep and tiredness.

What is Exhaustion?

Simple definition: Having wholly used up strength, patience, or resources; tired beyond endurance.

The surprising thing is that exhaustion can be a symptom of several things having nothing to do with extended effort. In fact, one thing that can cause exhaustion is inaction — the opposite of extended effort. Sitting around the house moping can make one just as tired as mountain climbing. It’s not real tiredness in this case; it’s psychosomatic.

Another thing tiredness can be traced to is some form of introversion or fixated attention. An example might be sitting in front of a computer or TV, eyes focused at a fixed distance for an extended period of time.

For these, the remedy is extroversion; go take a walk and look at the things around you.

Do You Feel Washed-Out?

Simple definition: Depleted in vigor or animation; faded.

When reading or studying, if you skip over words, symbols or abbreviations you don’t know and continue reading, you will start to feel washed-out. If you just now yawned, you are a good candidate for this remedy. The remedy is simple: go back, find the term you didn’t know, look it up in a dictionary, and use it in sentences until you understand it. Then re-read what you missed.

Have You Tried and Failed?

A blunted or abandoned purpose makes one feel tired or dopey. The remedy is to rekindle the failed purpose.

Are Your Efforts and Communications Cut or Incomplete?

Do you experience a lot of interruptions at work? Do people walk by, talk to you, and then walk away before you can respond?

When Cycles of Action or Cycles of Communication are cut or incomplete, you can experience tiredness that is otherwise unexplained. Again, the remedy is pretty simple: go back and complete the cycle of action or cycle of communication. Finish what was interrupted.

What Not To Do

These are not all the possible manifestations of tiredness, but these are fairly easy to recognize and have simple resolutions. The thing you must NOT do is think you have some “mental illness”, see a shrink, and take an antidepressant or other psychiatric drug which can be addictive and have horrific side effects. Take a nice long walk instead.

How psychiatry Perpetuates Mental Unhealthiness

Reference: United Nations Promoting Sustainable Development
Resolution adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on 25 September 2015: “Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

Sustainable: Of, relating to, or being a method or lifestyle for using resources so that the resources can be maintained and continued, and are not depleted or permanently damaged.
[from Old French sustenir (French: soutenir), from Latin sustineo, sustinere, from sub– (under) + teneo (hold, uphold, possess, guard, maintain)]

The U.N. Sustainable Development Goals

The 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) and their 169 associated targets adopted in 2015 and accepted by all Member States seek to realize the human rights of all and balance economic, social and environmental factors towards peace and prosperity for all.

To this end we examine some of the existing factors which block or inhibit the realization of these goals, and which must be eliminated so that the goals can be achieved in practice.

SDG 3: Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages

Target 3.4: By 2030, reduce by one third premature mortality from non-communicable diseases through prevention and treatment and promote mental health and wellbeing

How Psychiatry Obstructs Target 3.4

It’s the “promote mental health and wellbeing” that psychiatry fails at.

The psychiatric industry purports to be the sole arbiter on the subject of mental health. The facts, however, demonstrate otherwise.

In medicine, strict criteria exist for calling a condition a disease. Diseases are proven to exist by objective evidence and physical tests. Yet, no psychiatric “diseases” have ever been proven to medically exist, and there are no clinical tests for so-called mental illnesses.

Psychiatrists do not know the causes or cures for any mental disorder or what their “treatments” specifically do to the patient. They have only theories and conflicting opinions about the diagnoses and methods, and are lacking any scientific basis for these. As a past president of the World Psychiatric Association stated, “The time when psychiatrists considered that they could cure the mentally ill is gone. In the future, the mentally ill have to learn to live with their illness.”

One prevailing psychiatric theory (key to psychotropic drug sales) is that mental disorders result from a chemical imbalance in the brain. As with its other theories, there is no biological or other evidence to prove this. There are no tests available for assessing the chemical status of a living person’s brain.

The brain is not the real cause of life’s problems. People do experience problems and upsets in life that may result in mental troubles, sometimes very serious. But to represent that these troubles are caused by incurable “brain diseases” that can only be alleviated with dangerous pills is dishonest, harmful and often deadly. Such drugs are often more potent than a narcotic and capable of driving one to violence or suicide. They mask the real cause of problems in life and debilitate the individual, so denying him or her the opportunity for real recovery and hope for the future.

Of course, the real problem is that psychiatrists fraudulently diagnose life’s problems as an “illness”, and stigmatize unwanted behavior or study problems as “diseases.” Psychiatry’s stigmatizing labels, programs and treatments are harmful junk science; their diagnoses of “mental disorders” are a hoax — unscientific, fraudulent and harmful. All psychiatric treatments, not just psychiatric drugs, are dangerous.

Psychiatry must be eradicated so that SDG 3 can occur.

Never Out of SORTS

The Missouri attorney general’s office convinced a Jasper County jury that an 86-year-old former minister is still at risk of sodomizing teenage boys, even after he completed a 15-year prison sentence for doing so. He was sentenced to involuntary commitment in a secure state psychiatric facility essentially for the rest of his life.

The Sex Offender Rehabilitation and Treatment Services (SORTS) program in Missouri has been criticized since it started in 1999. It currently costs Missouri taxpayers $36.5 million per year to fund additional life sentences disguised as treatment for 257 patients after they have already completed their normal criminal prison terms.

Missouri Statutes 632.480 and 632.484 define a sexually violent predator as someone who suffers from a mental abnormality which makes the person more likely than not to engage in predatory acts of sexual violence if not confined in a secure facility — as determined by either a psychiatrist or psychologist.

The Pot Calling the Kettle Black

The fact is, when a psychiatrist or psychologist points the sexual predator finger at a person, they are likely doing so to remove suspicion from themselves or their profession. Research shows that between 10% and 25% of mental health practitioners sexually abuse their own patients. To cover up their crimes, psychiatrists have used drugs or electroshock in an effort to eliminate the patient’s memory of the rape, and use the involuntary commitment of others convicted of sexual predation to take the heat off themselves.

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) labels child sexual abuse as a mental disorder, when it is actually an ethical failure. With the DSM, psychiatry has taken countless aspects of human behavior and reclassified them as a “mental illness” simply by adding the term “disorder” onto them. While even key DSM contributors admit that there is no scientific or medical validity to the “disorders,” the DSM nonetheless serves as a diagnostic tool, not only for individual treatment, but also for child custody disputes, discrimination cases, court testimony, education and more. As the diagnoses completely lack scientific criteria, anyone can be labeled mentally ill, and subjected to dangerous and life threatening “treatments” and forced incarceration based solely on opinion.

Contact your Missouri State Senator and Representative and ask them to remove all references to the DSM from Missouri State Law.

In the case of SORTS, the person has paid their debt to society as determined by a criminal court, and further enforced incarceration by civil commitment is clearly a violation of Constitutional rights.

The fact that civil commitment is couched in such doublespeak as “for his own good,” or “to prevent him from committing harm,” is unfortunate, for it obfuscates the actual intention, which is to harm in the name of help.

With health care eating up vast amounts of our national budget, the first cut to make is the cost of “treating” people who have paid their societal debt and prefer not to be further mentally treated. Involuntary commitment laws hike federal, state, county, city and private health care costs under the strange circumstance of a patient-recipient who cannot say no.

The crime rate, including sexual violence, is on a long-term increase, and has reached epidemic proportions. The fact that most criminals pass through psychiatry’s portals before the crime speaks for itself. The number of mentally ill, per the statistics of psychiatric bodies themselves, continues to rise each year — which serves to point out the ironic existence of a profession which must constantly advertise its failures in order to gain greater government funding.

Psychiatrists’ own conduct, their interest in easy seizure of people, their inhuman acts and torture committed in the name of “treatment” and their fraudulent and failing “science,” is at complete variance to their public facade of “mental health.”

If a dangerous offense is committed by a person, then the fact remains criminal statutes exist to address this. As the late Dr. Thomas Szasz stated, “All criminal behavior should be controlled by means of the criminal law, from the administration of which psychiatrists ought to be excluded.”

Contact your Missouri State Senator and Representative and ask them to remove the SORTS program from Missouri law.

How psychiatry Perpetuates Hunger and Malnutrition

Reference:  United Nations Promoting Sustainable Development

Resolution adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on 25 September 2015

“Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development”

Sustainable: Of, relating to, or being a method or lifestyle for using resources so that the resources can be maintained and continued, and are not depleted or permanently damaged.

[from Old French sustenir (French: soutenir), from Latin sustineo, sustinere, from sub- (under) + teneo (hold, uphold, possess, guard, maintain)]

The U.N. Sustainable Development Goals

The 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) and their 169 associated targets adopted in 2015 and accepted by all Member States seek to realize the human rights of all and balance economic, social and environmental factors towards peace and prosperity for all.

To this end we examine some of the existing factors which block or inhibit the realization of these goals, and which must be eliminated so that the goals can be achieved in practice.

SDG 2: End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and
promote sustainable agriculture

Target 2.2: By 2030, end all forms of malnutrition, including achieving, by 2025, the internationally agreed targets on stunting and wasting in children under 5 years of age, and address the nutritional needs of adolescent girls, pregnant and lactating women and older persons.

How Psychiatry Obstructs Target 2.2

The possible side effects of common psychiatric drugs typically include adverse health and nutritional effects that would interfere with proper growth and digestion, particularly for children whose tolerance for adverse reactions may be lower than that of adults. There are approximately 8 million children in the U.S. who are regularly being given psychiatric drugs, and up to 20 million worldwide.

Here are some examples of such side effects.

Psychostimulants (such as ADHD drugs): anorexia, liver problems, loss of appetite, stomach pain, stunted growth, vomiting, weight loss.

Newer antidepressants (such as SSRIs): changes in ability to taste food, heartburn, loss of appetite, indigestion, nausea, problems with teeth, stomach pain, sudden upset stomach, vomiting, weight loss.

Older antidepressants: changes in appetite or weight, constipation, diarrhea, difficulty swallowing, gas, heartburn, jaw spasms, liver problems, nausea, stomach pain, vomiting, swelling of the throat or tongue, unusual taste in the mouth.

Antipsychotics (major tranquilizers or neuroleptics): birth defects, blood disorders, blood-sugar abnormalities, constipation, liver failure, diabetes, diarrhea, difficulty swallowing, excessive weight gain, heartburn, hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, indigestion, loss of appetite, nausea, pancreatitis, sore throat, vomiting.

Anti-anxiety drugs: susceptibility to infection, changes in appetite, constipation, diarrhea, seizures, heartburn, liver problems, nausea, stomach pain, swelling of the tongue or throat, upset stomach, vomiting, weight changes.

Barbiturates: kidney disease, liver disease, upset stomach.

Lithium: change in the ability to taste food, constipation, decreased appetite, diabetes, diarrhea, gas, indigestion, loss of appetite, nausea, seizures, stomach pain, swelling of the tongue or throat, thyroid problems, tongue pain, vomiting, weight gain or loss.

Of course, the real problem is that psychiatrists fraudulently diagnose life’s problems as an “illness”, and stigmatize unwanted behavior or study problems as “diseases.” Psychiatry’s stigmatizing labels, programs and treatments are harmful junk science; their diagnoses of “mental disorders” are a hoax — unscientific, fraudulent and harmful. All psychiatric treatments, not just psychiatric drugs, are dangerous.

Psychiatry must be eradicated so that SDG 2 can occur.

Nursing Homes Abusing Dementia Patients with Antipsychotics

A Human Rights Watch report found that many nursing homes are sedating their dementia residents by misusing antipsychotic drugs.

Former nursing home administrators admitted doling out drugs without having appropriate diagnoses, securing informed consent or divulging risks.

Having observed this personally for myself in a local St. Louis elder care facility, it is no surprise.

The report estimates that each week more than 179,000 elderly people living in U.S. nursing homes are fraudulently given antipsychotic drugs, without an approved psychiatric diagnosis, to suppress difficult behaviors and ease the load on overwhelmed staff.

This abusive practice benefits drugmakers to the tune of hundreds of millions of dollars, largely at the expense of the U.S. government.

Furthermore, the FDA has not deemed antipsychotic drugs an effective or safe way to treat symptoms associated with dementia. In fact, the FDA cautions that these drugs pose dangers for elderly patients with dementia, even doubling the risk of death.

Missouri’s antipsychotic use rate has remained around 18.5% or higher since 2016, and at 18.6 percent it’s now fifth worst in the nation.

Current research indicates that the fewer nurses available per patient, the more likely antipsychotics are to be improperly prescribed.

The shocking truth is that one in five seniors in the U.S. suffers from abusively prescribed psychoactive drugs. The psychiatric industry gets away with this abuse because they have fraudulently redefined old age as a “mental illness” in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) and the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11).

Examples of diagnoses that could be age-related

DSM-5: Phase of life problem, Problem related to living in a residential institution, Insufficient social insurance or welfare support, Alzheimer’s disease; and of course the catch-all Unspecified mental disorder

ICD-11: Various categories of Dementia; and in contrast to the DSM, the ICD just names it outright as Old age

A For-Profit Disease

To psychiatrists old age is a “mental disorder,” a for-profit disease for which they have no cure, but for which they will happily supply endless prescriptions of psychoactive drugs or electro-convulsive therapy. In most cases, the elderly are merely suffering from physical problems related to their age; for which psychiatry’s answer is to label them “depressed” or having “dementia.”

Through these fraudulent diagnoses, psychiatrists can involuntarily commit the elderly to a psychiatric facility, take control of their finances, override their wishes regarding their business, property or health care needs, and defraud their health insurance.

If an elderly person in your environment is displaying symptoms of mental trauma or unusual behavior, ensure that they get competent medical care from a non-psychiatric doctor. Insist upon a thorough physical examination to determine whether an underlying, undiagnosed physical problem is causing the condition.

For more information, download and read the CCHR bookletElderly Abuse – Cruel Mental Health Programs – Report and recommendations on psychiatry abusing seniors.

Schizophrenia: The Sacred Symbol of Psychiatry

In 1976 Dr. Thomas Szasz, the co-founder of CCHR, published an article in The British Journal of Psychiatry called “Schizophrenia: The Sacred Symbol of Psychiatry,” in which Szasz argues that there is no such disease as schizophrenia.

Schizophrenia — the most common and most disabling of the so-called mental illnesses — has become the poster disease for psychiatry, the psychiatric symbol of why we need psychiatrists.

However, Szasz recognized that there are no clinical tests for such a “disease,” and that labeling the symptoms was rather psychiatry’s attempt to control deviant behavior rather than to cure disease.

Szasz stated that “schizophrenia is defined so vaguely that, in actuality, it is a term often applied to almost any kind of behavior of which the speaker disapproves.”

Psychiatrists today remain committed to labeling “schizophrenia” a mental disease despite, after a century of research, the complete absence of objective proof that it exists as a physical brain abnormality.

The unfortunate aspect of this is that psychiatry clings tenaciously to antipsychotics as the treatment for “schizophrenia,” despite their proven risks and studies which show that when patients stop taking these drugs, they improve.

Psychiatry is Enamored of Symbols

This deserves a more complete examination of the subject of “symbols.” We name, or label, objects and ideas, which in itself is not a bad thing, as long as we realize that the symbol is not the thing itself.

A symbol is something which has mass, meaning and mobility. An example is a body. We label a body with a name which we then use to mean the person; the body moves, carrying its mass and meaning around for others to see and experience.

On top of that, we label it “schizophrenic”, so we have a symbol of a symbol. Now we don’t have to directly confront the painful symptoms; we just label it “a schizophrenic.” We no longer have to cure it, since now we “know” what it is.

Psychiatry insists that one have a label, which is one way to trap and keep a person located. Using and being slaves to symbols is basically a substitute for just knowing. We no longer have to really know what it is, because we “know” it is “a schizophrenic.” So psychiatry has operated on this basis for over a hundred years, never really finding out what schizophrenia is so it can be cured. People just have to live with it, and take psychiatric drugs which are highly profitable and which suppress the symptoms but do not actually fix it.

Psychiatry Uses Other Symbols As Well

The psychiatric or psychological analysis of symbols in dreams has been a fruitless red herring for many centuries. It can certainly be interesting and fun to imagine all the ways dreams could be interpreted; but really, it doesn’t actually lead to cures. Dreams are mostly puns on words and situations.  Thiamine (vitamin B1) has been used successfully at doses of 250 mg/day to treat patients having nightmares. B1 at roughly $20 per bottle beats any anti-anxiety or anti-psychotic drug currently being prescribed for bad dreams, since one of the possible side effects of these drugs is (wait for it…) nightmares!

Now think of the Rorschach Ink Blot Test, originally developed in 1921 by Swiss psychologist Hermann Rorschach as a tool for the diagnosis and labeling of schizophrenia. Over the years several different scoring systems were used, including pure subjective judgment; one present day scoring system wasn’t developed until the 1960s, and another scoring system was published in 2011. There are naturally many critics of these systems, including some court cases calling the results bogus.

Given the fraudulent nature of psychiatric “diagnosis” in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) and the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11), we are calling the Rorschach symbol test a total hoax.

And Speaking of the DSM and the ICD

Of course, the names of so-called mental disorders in the DSM and ICD are the ultimate in misleading symbols. They appear to designate actual mental states, but upon close inspection they are empty of scientific meaning.

With these tomes, psychiatry has taken countless aspects of normal human behavior and reclassified them as a “mental illness” simply by adding the term “disorder” onto them. As the diagnoses completely lack scientific criteria, anyone can be labeled mentally ill, and subjected to dangerous and life threatening “treatments” based solely on opinion.

Though the DSM weighs less than five pounds, its influence pervades all aspects of modern American society: our governments, our courts, our military, our media and our schools.

Using it, psychiatrists can enforce psychiatric drugging, seize your children and even take away your most precious personal freedoms. It is the engine that drives a $330 billion psychiatric industry.

Missouri law explicitly names the DSM as the official reference for mental illnesses. Contact your State Senator and Representative and ask them to remove all references to the DSM from State Law. We should not support symbolism that hits you over the head; a symbol should not be a cymbal.

How psychiatry Perpetuates Poverty

Reference:  United Nations Promoting Sustainable Development
Resolution adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on 25 September 2015
“Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development”
Sustainable: Of, relating to, or being a method or lifestyle for using resources so that the resources can be maintained and continued, and are not depleted or permanently damaged.
[from Old French sustenir (French: soutenir), from Latin sustineo, sustinere, from sub- (under) + teneo (hold, uphold, possess, guard, maintain)]

The U.N. Sustainable Development Goals

The 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) and their 169 associated targets adopted in 2015 and accepted by all Member States seek to realize the human rights of all and balance economic, social and environmental factors towards peace and prosperity for all.

To this end we examine some of the existing factors which block or inhibit the realization of these goals, and which must be eliminated so that the goals can be achieved in practice.

SDG 1: End poverty in all its forms everywhere.

Target 1.5: By 2030, build the resilience of the poor and those in vulnerable situations and reduce their exposure and vulnerability to climate-related extreme events and other economic, social and environmental shocks and disasters.

How Psychiatry Obstructs Target 1.5

One-fourth of America’s children live in extreme poverty. Poor children are likelier to be given harmful and addictive antipsychotics, particularly children in the foster care system. Children covered by Medicaid are given powerful antipsychotic drugs at a rate four times higher than children whose parents have private insurance.

There is a clear psychiatric intention to keep poor people poor by inundating them with harmful psychotropic drugs by fraudulently diagnosing them with fake mental diseases. Contrary to psychiatric opinion, children are not “experimental animals,” they are human beings who have every right to expect protection, care, love and the chance to reach their full potential in life. They will only be denied this from within the verbal and chemical straitjackets that are psychiatry’s labels and drugs.

Psychiatry must be eradicated so that SDG 1 can occur.

Psychiatric Mind Games

Today we are going to discuss games.

English definitions of a game (this word has more than one meaning in English, as is common for many English words): activity engaged in for diversion or amusement; a procedure or strategy for gaining an end; an illegal or shady scheme; a physical or mental competition; an activity regarded as a contest; wild animals hunted for sport or food.
[Traced back to Old Norse gaman “sport, amusement”.]

Technical definition of a game: A game consists of freedoms, barriers and purposes; plus control and uncontrol. An opponent must be uncontrolled, otherwise it wouldn’t be a game.

Freedom: Something one is allowed to do.
Barrier: Something one is not allowed to do, or an obstacle.
Purpose: The “why” of the activity.

These are often shortened to “the rules.”

Games also have a wienie, meaning a prize or result.

The physical universe is a game consisting of barriers.
Life in general is a set of games. A motto of Life is “Any game is better than no game.”

There are many conditions which either contribute to a game or which hinder a game. Examples of conditions which contribute to a game are attention and motion. Examples of conditions which hinder a game are no attention and no motion.

Ideally a player would know that he or she is playing a game. All too often, a player (in this case a pawn) may not know or understand that he or she is being played in a game. Thus one must have the power of choice to play or not to play in a game.

Psychiatric Abuse of Games

The psychiatric industry is attempting to make games the subject of mental disorders, so they can prescribe harmful psychotropic drugs and make some money off of it. The International Classification of Diseases Revision 11 (ICD-11) has a category called “Gaming disorder”, in which a person is labeled mentally ill for persistently playing digital or video games.

The late professor Thomas Szasz said, “If we recognize that ‘mental illness’ is a metaphor for disapproved thoughts, feelings, and behaviors, we are compelled to recognize as well that the primary function of Psychiatry is to control thought, mood, and behavior.”

In other words, psychiatry wants to regulate your games because they disapprove of your power of choice in selecting which games you want to play and when you want to play them.

ICD-11 also categorizes two conditions of games as mental illnesses. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is diagnosed by persistent inattention (a no-games condition) or hyperactivity (a high degree of motion, or a games condition.) Again, an attempt to put the kibosh on a person’s natural game behavior because a psychiatrist cannot tolerate and disapproves of either the motion or the motionlessness.

The High Stakes Psychiatric Drug Money Game

The game that psychiatry is playing, to everyone else’s disadvantage, is the high stakes drug money game. Billions of dollars are riding on harmful psychiatric drugs. Medicaid spends more than $6 billion per year on psychiatric drugs, paid for by taxpayers. The annual revenue for ADHD drugs in the United States is $13 billion. Annual sales of antipsychotics in the U.S. is expected to reach $18.5 billion by 2022. And drugs are just the tip of the psychiatric money game; The United States loses approximately $100 billion to healthcare fraud each year, and up to $40 billion of this is due to fraudulent practices in the mental health industry.

Psychiatric Mind Games

“Mind Game” is an idiom which means “an act of calculated psychological manipulation, done especially to confuse or intimidate.” Psychiatry continually plays these mind games by redefining words and using misleading advertising to make one think they are helping when actually they are harming.

For example, the psychiatric drug Addyi is advertised as the “female viagra” when in reality it is an antidepressant.

Chantix is advertised as a smoking cessation drug when in reality it is a benzodiazepine-based anti-anxiety drug.

Electroshock (electroconvulsive therapy or ECT) is blatantly advertised as safe and effective when in fact it destroys brain cells and memory and is a gross violation of human rights.

Ketamine and Spravato are being relentlessly touted as new antidepressants when in fact they are just anesthetics which knock you out so you don’t feel much of anything.

The Bottom Line

So basically, psychiatric games are all barriers, no freedoms, and a purpose to harm and defraud.

And if you play their game, you are a pawn and not a player.

A Killing Rampage Without Guns

An attacker killed eight students and injured two others with a cleaver (NOT a gun) at an elementary school in Chaoyangpo village of Enshi city in the Hubei province of central China on September 3, 2019.

China tightly restricts private gun ownership, making knives and homemade explosives the most common weapons in violent crimes.”

The attacker was released in June, 2018, after serving more than eight years in jail for attempted murder. We aren’t sure about China, but in the U.S. prison inmates are regularly dosed with dangerous psychiatric drugs known to cause violence and suicide.

As of this writing, the case is still under investigation and no motive has been found for the attacks. Not much additional information is available, so speculation abounds. Our own speculation is that the attacker was most probably given psychiatric drugs while incarcerated, drugs which are known to cause violence and suicide.

We do know that China’s Ministry of Public Security uses psychiatric involuntary commitment to remove dissidents from society.

“Given the enormous increases in psychiatric drug sales in China, there is little doubt that the pharmaceutical industry has landed a lucrative market, driven by a psychiatric community willing to deliberately politicize psychiatric labeling.

Under China’s current system of compulsory mental health treatment, people can be sent to asylums for treatment against their will by blood relatives or spouses, and forcibly given harmful psychiatric drugs.

It has also been well documented that psychiatric torture occurs inside Chinese prisons, often conducted with the goal of securing a confession, even though the Chinese government has officially made obtaining confessions through the use of torture illegal.

Let’s just aim for the right target and get the actual data, shall we? At least in the U.S. we can contact our government officials and urge them to hold legislative hearings to fully investigate the correlation between psychiatric drugs, violence, and suicide. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration, representing the U.S. government’s interest in protecting citizens from harmful drugs, already says that antidepressants increase the risk of suicidal thinking and behavior; children and adolescents who are started on antidepressants should be observed closely for clinical worsening, suicidality, agitation, irritability, or unusual changes in behavior. And keep those meat cleavers away from kids on Prozac.

Pain is inevitable. Suffering is optional. [Buddhist proverb]

The subject of pain is often in the news. This week (23 August 2019) we notice the St. Louis Business Journal carrying an article about the National Institutes of Health giving a $2.1 million grant to a St. Louis University pain researcher “to help open up a new avenue for pain medication research.”

We have a suspicion that the whole subject of pain is not understood very well by many people, so we thought we’d discuss it here.

What is Pain?

The first order of business should be a useful definition of pain. As is usual with many English words, there are multiple definitions of the word. Pain is a perception available to living beings.

English definitions: punishment; an unpleasant bodily sensation; physical discomfort; mental or emotional distress or suffering; something troublesome; a result of loss; a result of causing bad acts.
[Middle English, from Anglo-French peine, from Latin poena, from Greek poin? “payment, penalty”]

Technical definitions: Pain is the randomity (misalignment) produced by sudden or strong counter-efforts (i.e. efforts opposing optimum survival); the ultimate penalty of destructive activity; the warning of loss; the threat of non-survival; the punishment for errors in trying to survive.

Memories of pain can be just as damaging as the actual pain itself. Unconsciousness to greater or lesser degree is a symptom of pain. Unfortunately for humans, any sensation is better than no sensation; so in the absence of any sensation one desires pain.

Pain can be synthesized as an electronic flow. Psychiatrists use the pain of electroshock and other harmful psychiatric treatments as a coercive control mechanism — a means of getting someone to behave as they have decided one should behave. A person can be so overwhelmed by pain that they become addicted to it.

Painkillers

Doctors prescribe pain killers to relieve pain. However, it has never been known exactly how or why these “work.” Research into pain killers generally occurs by accidental discoveries, and the results often have undesirable side effects. The actions of pain killers include impeding the electrical conductivity of nerve channels, rendering a person unfeeling. Pain drugs block wanted sensations as well as unwanted ones.

Psychiatric Drugs

Psychiatric drugs are prescribed for various types of physical pain and mental trauma. Read the manufacturer’s fine print for any psychiatric drug and it will say in so many words that “we don’t really know how this drug works,” and they all have bad side effects; although one could say that there are no “side effects” since these are the actual effects of the drugs, albeit unwanted. It could be dangerous to immediately cease taking psychiatric drugs because of potential significant withdrawal side effects. No one should abruptly stop taking any psychiatric drug without the advice and assistance of a competent medical doctor.

Because of the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), psychiatrists have deceived millions into thinking that the best answer to life’s many pains lies with the “latest and greatest” psychiatric drug. The DSM has led to the unnecessary drugging of millions of Americans who could be diagnosed, treated, and cured by non-psychiatric health care providers without the use of toxic and potentially lethal drugs.

Since psychiatric drugs do not actually cure conditions, but merely suppress symptoms, the patient may be lulled into a temporary sense of wellness; whatever condition has caused the symptom is still present and often growing worse.

A person in chronic physical pain may be misdiagnosed with a so-called mental disorder, labeled neurotic, and given a psychiatric drug which only makes the condition worse.

Authors Richard Hughes and Robert Brewin, in their book, The Tranquilizing of America, warned that although psychotropic drugs may appear “to ‘take the edge off’ anxiety, pain, and stress, they also take the edge off life itself … these pills not only numb the pain but numb the whole mind.”

Did we mention that the three Sackler brothers of Purdue Pharma, major enablers of the opioid addiction crisis, were all psychiatrists? A June 26, 2017 article on Kaiser Health News by Vickie Connor presents the information that, “Adults with a mental illness receive more than 50 percent of the 115 million opioid prescriptions in the United States annually.” We don’t really know which came first — the mental trauma or the physical pain; but it doesn’t really matter which comes first. The bottom line is that neither opioids nor psychiatric drugs are workable treatments.

What About the Suffering?

So how does one in pain overcome the suffering, as the ancient Buddhist proverb goes? Basically, understanding relieves suffering. We want you to understand that psychiatry kills. Find Out! Fight Back!