Florida Court Rules Physician May Be Liable in Suicide

September 11th, 2016

Florida’s Supreme Court ruled August 25, 2016 that a physician could be sued for medical malpractice in the case of a patient’s suicide. [Medscape Medical News, 2016-08-26] The victim was taking antidepressant psychiatric drugs. The Florida Supreme Court ruled that the case should proceed to trial.

The prescribing doctor, Joseph Stephen Chirillo, Jr., M.D., is a Family Physician in Englewood, Florida and was treating the victim for depression.

Evidence cited was, 1) Dr. Chirillo knew that patients who stopped taking Effexor abruptly had an increased risk for suicide, and 2) stopping Effexor was “a contributing factor” in the decedent’s suicide.

Primary Care doctors are often continuing the psychiatric drug bandwagon pioneered by psychiatrists. In fact, it may now be that more people get antidepressants from their family doctor than from a psychiatrist.

Medscape believes that one in five patients prescribed antidepressants stop taking them without telling their doctor. It has been known for quite some time that the side effects of violence and suicide can occur from abrupt withdrawal as well as from continuing to take these harmful and addictive psychotropic drugs. No one should stop taking any psychiatric drug without the advice and assistance of a competent medical doctor.

For more information about coming off of psychiatric drugs safely, click here.

Side effects (also called “adverse reactions”) are the body’s natural response to having a chemical disrupt its normal functioning.

One could also say that there are no drug side effects, these adverse reactions are actually the drug’s real effects; some of these effects just happen to be unwanted. Read more about how drugs work here.

Psychiatry’s theory that a brain–based, chemical imbalance causes mental illness was invented to sell drugs. Misled by all the drug marketing efforts, 100 million people worldwide—20 million of them children—are taking psychotropic drugs, convinced they are correcting some physical or chemical imbalance in their body. In reality, they are taking powerful substances so dangerous they can cause hallucinations, psychosis, heart irregularities, diabetes, hostility, aggression, sexual dysfunction and suicide.

While not everyone on psychotropic drugs commits suicide or uncontrolled acts of violence, the effects of the many other side effects can be horrendous. Not the least of which is the fact that the biological drug model (based on bogus mental disorders) is a disease marketing campaign which prevents governments from funding real medical solutions for people experiencing difficulty. While the patient may be lulled into a temporary sense of wellness, whatever condition has caused the symptom is still present and often growing worse, as the original condition has not been found and treated.

Because of the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), psychiatrists and family physicians have deceived millions into thinking that the best answer to life’s many routine problems and challenges lies with the “latest and greatest” psychiatric drug.

Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs (PDMP)

September 3rd, 2016

According to PDMP proponents, because some people abuse prescription drugs, the government should track all people who use them – regardless of whether a person has committed any crime. We call this “inspection before the fact of any wrongdoing,” or “pre-crime,” the tendency in criminal justice systems to focus on crimes not yet committed.

In this year’s Missouri legislative session House Bill 1922 was introduced by Rep. Jay Barnes (R, 60), called “Prescription Abuse Registry”. Fortunately the bill was referred to the Health Insurance Committee with no further action.

Individuals 18 years and older who have been reported to the Department of Health and Senior Services by a health care provider or their parent or child that they believe such individual has abused controlled substances would be listed in the registry.

So far, Missouri is the only state without a PDMP.

Wait, that’s not all. Senate Bill 768 was introduced by Sen. Rob Schaaf (R, 34), called the “Prescription Drug Monitoring Act”. According to this bill, the Department of Health and Senior Services would be required to establish and maintain a program to monitor the prescribing and dispensing of all Schedule II through Schedule IV controlled substances by all licensed professionals who prescribe or dispense these substances in Missouri to anyone aged 18 or older. This bill was heard by the Transportation, Infrastructure and Public Safety Committee with no further action.

Not to be deterred by defeat in the Missouri legislature, the St. Louis County Council passed its own version of a PDMP in March 2016, saying that it is too easy for people to become addicted to prescription drugs. And the City of St. Louis passed its own PDMP version in May.

The problems with PDMPs stem from our right to privacy and due process as protected by amendments to the U.S. Constitution. The Ninth Amendment says that “The enumeration in the Constitution of certain rights shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.” This has been interpreted as justification for broadly reading the Bill of Rights to protect privacy in ways not specifically provided in the first eight amendments. The Fourteenth Amendment says that “No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law.”

While we certainly wish no citizen to suffer from the very real and harmful effects of drug addiction, we also recognize that when the government interferes with an individual’s self determinism, even a self-destructive self determinism, we are sliding down the slope to Big Brother knows all, tells all, and controls all.

We much prefer the route of education and rehabilitation, where we beef up society’s efforts to handle drug problems with appropriate education and effective rehabilitation; not to mention curbing the abuse of psychiatric drugs and concomitant psychiatric fraud and abuse.

When psychiatrists or doctors prescribe dangerous, potentially life-threatening and addictive psychotropic drugs to children and adults, they should be charged with reckless endangerment because these drugs are documented to cause side effects including, but not limited to, suicide, mania, violence, heart problems, stroke, diabetes, death and sudden death.

For example, most of the ADHD literature prepared for public consumption does not address the abuse potential or actual abuse of methylphenidate (Ritalin.) Instead, methylphenidate is routinely portrayed as a benign, mild substance that is not associated with abuse or serious side effects. In reality, however, there is an abundance of scientific literature which indicates that methylphenidate shares the same abuse potential as other Schedule II stimulants. Regarding PDMP then, why not just correct the literature, instead of counting how many times a Ritalin prescription is filled? This would be a more productive way to address Ritalin abuse.

Start by educating yourself, your family, your legislators, your associates and acquaintances, about the dangers and abuse potential of psychiatric drugs.

The Greater Good

August 27th, 2016

What are the limits that the State can do claiming “The Greater Good?”

Strict scrutiny is a form of judicial review that courts use to determine the constitutionality of certain laws. To pass a strict scrutiny review, the legislature must have passed the law to further a “compelling governmental interest,” and must have narrowly tailored the law to achieve that interest.

The concept of “strict scrutiny” arises from the 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution which states, “No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.”

The situations we are considering here are any attempts by the legislature to require that a child or adult be forced to take psychotropic drugs, or indeed to be forced to accept any kind of psychiatric treatment, including involuntary commitment.

There are not many issues in the field of mental hygiene law which raise more controversy than that of involuntary commitment and treatment. The courts have unequivocally recognized that involuntary treatment, meaning involuntary or “civil” commitment and enforced drugging, by the government is a substantial deprivation of liberty, and therefore falls under the aegis of the 14th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. However, there has continued to be a legal erosion of this principle by passing laws stipulating the rules of due process in such cases, all intended to give the State more power to enforce their own considerations of what is the greater good.

Missouri Revised Statutes Chapter 632 Section 300 is an example. To paraphrase,  if a mental health coordinator has reasonable cause to believe, as the result of personal observation or investigation, that the likelihood of serious harm by a person to himself or others as a result of a mental disorder is imminent unless the person is immediately taken into custody, the mental health coordinator must request a peace officer to take the person into custody and transport them to a mental health facility.

We no longer have any compelling governmental interest, since it is one person’s judgment or opinion, not the government’s; and the due process of law in this case is just one person’s judgment or opinion, sanctioned by a law that clearly was tailored to bypass strict scrutiny.

The fact that these actions are couched in such doublespeak as “to prevent him from committing harm” is unfortunate, for it hides the evil intention to incapacitate the individual.

For more information, click here.

Missouri Mental Health News

August 18th, 2016

Recent information from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch indicates some progress in reducing psychiatric fraud and abuse in Missouri. Of course, the Post-Dispatch slants the information to beg for more government and insurance money for psychiatrists and psychiatric facilities; but we can take a win seeing the number of psychiatrists declining.

We do understand that people can have mental trauma needing compassion and effective care. Psychiatric drugs and other “treatments” such as shock therapy, however, are harmful. Not only do psychiatrists not understand the etiology (cause) of any mental disorder, they cannot cure them. In effect, psychiatrists are still saying that mental problems are incurable and that the afflicted are condemned to lifelong suffering—on psychotropic drugs. Psychotropic drugs, however, are unworkable and dangerous, and while they may temporarily mask some symptoms they do not treat, correct or cure any physical disease or condition.

We generally take cure to mean the elimination of some unwanted condition with some effective treatment. The primary purpose of any mental health treatment must be the therapeutic care and treatment of individuals who are suffering emotional disturbance. The only effective measure of this treatment must be “patients recovering and being sent, sane, back into society as productive individuals.” This, we would call a cure. Psychiatry produces no cures.

There are plenty of healthy alternatives to psychiatry. The correct action on a seriously mentally disturbed person is a full searching clinical examination by a competent medical, not psychiatric, doctor.

The real problem with the psychiatric industry is that psychiatrists fraudulently diagnose life’s problems as an “illness”, and stigmatize unwanted behavior or study problems as “diseases.” Psychiatry’s stigmatizing labels, programs and treatments are harmful junk science; their diagnoses of “mental disorders” are a hoax – unscientific, fraudulent and harmful. All psychiatric treatments, not just psychiatric drugs, are dangerous.

There is no licensed psychiatrist in 72 Missouri counties. That’s some progress. People needing help in those areas need competent medical care, not psychiatric abuse.

A majority of psychiatrists don’t accept Medicaid, and a growing number refuse all health insurance plans. That’s some progress. We should be providing funding and insurance coverage only for proven, workable treatments that verifiably and dramatically improve or cure mental health problems.

The average wait to see a psychiatrist in the St. Louis area is estimated at 10 to 30 days and can reach six months for children and teens; what are they doing in the meantime? They should be exploring non-psychiatric alternatives.

There are 1,174 psychiatric hospital beds in the state, down from 2,600 in 1990. That’s some progress. Contact your Missouri state legislators and encourage them to continue reducing psychiatric hospital beds in favor of real and effective medical treatment.

Many people with mental trauma end up in county jails when they fail to find treatment elsewhere. This is not progress; this is overloading an already failing system with more failures. A major part of the treatment for prison inmates (used less for rehabilitation than for managing and disciplining inmates) is a regimen of powerful psychiatric drugs, despite numerous studies showing that aggression, violence and suicide are tied to their use. Prisons and jails have become America’s new mental asylums. The number of individuals with serious mental symptoms in prisons and jails exceeds the number of patients in state psychiatric hospitals tenfold. The cost of maintaining these inmates in prison skyrockets when psychiatric drugs are being used.

The Veterans Health Administration has also been actively recruiting psychiatrists from private practices to help treat an increase in so-called post-traumatic stress disorder among veterans. Since the 9/11 terrorist attacks, CCHR has investigated how psychiatrists are using the “War on Terror” to broaden their niche within the military to push mind-altering drugs on not only the fighting forces, but on veterans and the public at large.

Contact your Missouri state legislators to introduce and pass legislation designed to curb psychiatric fraud and abuse. For examples of Model Legislation, click here.

Missouri Mental Health

August 13th, 2016

Gov. Jay Nixon today [7/15/2016] said that Missouri is among the top five states in the number of people trained [27,730] in Mental Health First Aid and, among that group, leads in the percentage of the population trained. Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) is a national program to teach the skills to respond to the signs of mental illness and substance use disorders. … Working with members of the General Assembly, the Governor secured $10 million annually for the Strengthening Mental Health Initiative.”

Sounds progressive, doesn’t it? Sounds like the Governor is committed to helping Missourians, doesn’t it?

But what’s wrong with this? Only that psychiatric treatment not only does not work, but is actually harmful.

For decades psychiatrists and psychologists have claimed a monopoly over the field of mental health. Governments and private health insurance companies have provided them with billions of dollars every year to treat “mental illness,” only to face industry demands for even more funds to improve the supposed, ever–worsening state of mental health.

No other industry can afford to fail consistently and expect to get more funding.

The fact is that psychiatrists don’t try to cure people of mental illness. They use drugs in an attempt to dull the pain.

The mental health monopoly has practically zero accountability and zero liability for its failures. This has allowed psychiatrists and psychologists to commit far more than just financial fraud. The roster of crimes committed by these “professionals” ranges from fraud, drug offenses, rape and sexual abuse to child molestation, assault, manslaughter and murder.

The primary purpose of mental health treatment must be the therapeutic care and treatment of individuals who are suffering emotional disturbance. It must never be the financial or personal gain of the practitioner. Those suffering are inevitably vulnerable and impressionable. Proper treatment therefore demands the highest level of trustworthiness and integrity in the practitioner.

For more information, click here to download and read the CCHR report Massive Fraud — Psychiatry‘s Corrupt Industry — Report and recommendations on the criminal mental health monopoly.

Researchers press American Psychiatric Association to retract a study

August 7th, 2016

Ed Silverman writes in StatNews:

“More than a decade ago, a published study touted the benefits of using the Celexa antidepressant to treat children and teens. A recent analysis, however, alleged the study had numerous problems — notably, there was no difference between the drug and a placebo. And so, the researchers and several other academics want the medical society and the journal that published the study to issue a retraction.”

“The researchers wrote that procedural deviations in the study were not reported; negative outcomes were not reported; side effects were misleadingly analyzed; and drafts of the study were prepared by company employees and outside ghostwriters.”

The current research (“The citalopram CIT-MD-18 pediatric depression trial: Deconstruction of medical ghostwriting, data mischaracterisation and academic malfeasance“, International Journal of Risk & Safety in Medicine 28 (2016) 33–43) concludes:

“Deconstruction of court documents revealed that protocol-specified outcome measures showed no statistically significant difference between citalopram [Celexa] and placebo. However, the published article concluded that citalopram was safe and significantly more efficacious than placebo for children and adolescents, with possible adverse effects on patient safety.”

See more information in these previous posts:




The Dangerous Environment

July 23rd, 2016

Injustice, War, Pollution, Debt, Drugs, Illiteracy, Terrorism, Ignorance, Enslavement

Many people are not only convinced that the environment is dangerous, but that it is steadily growing more so. For many, it’s more of a challenge than they feel up to. An “environmental challenge” exists in an area filled with irrationality. While we thrive on a challenge, we can also be overwhelmed by a challenge to which we cannot respond.

What is dangerousness? Something one is afraid to communicate with. So if you say, “Don’t communicate with this,” then people will think it is dangerous. There are real areas of danger in the environment, but there are also areas being made to seem more dangerous than they really are. For example, recent political campaigns stress the “dangerousness” of the environment. “Vote for me and I’ll make America Safe!”

The fact of the matter is that the environment is made to appear much more dangerous than it actually is. A great number of people are professional dangerous environment makers. This includes professions which require a dangerous environment for their existence such as the politician, the policeman, the newspaperman, the undertaker, the psychiatrist, and others. These people sell a dangerous environment. That is their mainstay. They feel that if they did not sell people on the idea the environment is dangerous, they would promptly go broke. So it is in their interest to make the environment far more dangerous than it is. This kind of misinformation is itself a clear and present danger to our personal safety.

Wherever psychiatry intervenes, the environment becomes more dangerous, more unsettled, more disturbed. PTSD, ADHD, Depression, Bipolar, Schizophrenia, on and on — psychiatry thrives on making people think they are sick; otherwise there would be no psychiatric patients, there would be no need for psychiatry. A wide variety of environmental stresses can contribute to the onset of mental trauma. People can have mental trauma in their lives; but the treatment is not psychiatry or psychiatric drugs. The treatment is finding out what is really wrong, and then finding out that something can be done about it, and then doing something about it. Actually, if you knew what the problem really was, you would already have fixed it; so the “finding out” steps are essential. Psychiatry entirely skips the “finding out” steps; it just prescribes a drug to deaden the pain.

It used to be that the term “mentally ill” was limited to mean crazy people like those talking to themselves in the streets and those acting irrationally, oblivious to the world around them. However, the symptoms of mental illness, today, have been re-defined and broadened by psychiatry to fit under the umbrella of any non-optimum behavior, including what is considered normal for that age. This, in turn, allows for wholesale diagnosis of everything from moodiness of a teenager to mathematics disorder, followed by treatment with dangerous mind-altering drugs with harmful side effects. It would make more sense to look to see where the symptoms are coming from and check out things such as diet, allergies, infections, toxic things in the environment, illiteracy, etc.

The psychiatricizing of normal everyday behavior by including personality quirks and traits is a lucrative business for the psychiatrist because by expanding the number of “mental illnesses” even ordinary people can become patients and added to the psychiatric marketing pool. Safe and effective medical treatments for mental difficulties are often kept buried. The fact is, there are many medical conditions that when undetected and untreated can appear as psychiatric “symptoms.” The psychiatric pharmaceutical industry is making a killing — $84 billion per year — based on people being labeled with mental disorders that are not founded on science or medicine, but on marketing campaigns designed to sell drugs.

An individual’s health level, sanity level, activity level and ambition level are all monitored by their own concept of the dangerousness of the environment. You are as successful as you adjust your environment to yourself, rather than the environment enforcing itself on you. Find something in your environment that isn’t being a threat. It will calm you down. Find Out About The Psychiatric Assault on America! Fight Back!

Ways to Reduce The Missouri Budget

July 20th, 2016

The Insane Bloat of the Missouri Department of Mental Health Budget from 1971 to 2016

$2 Billion and Rapidly Rising

The introduction and passage of legislation designed to curb psychiatric fraud and abuse can contribute to the reduction of the Department of Mental Health budget. For examples of Model Legislation, click here.

Reports show that:

* 10% to 25% of mental health practitioners sexually abuse patients.

* Psychiatry has the worst fraud track record of all medical disciplines.

* The largest health care fraud suit in history [$375 million] involved the smallest sector of healthcare–psychiatry.

* An estimated $20-$40 billion is defrauded in the mental health industry in any given year.

Download and read the full report “Massive Fraud — Psychiatry’s Corrupt Industry.

1. Establish or increase the number of psychiatric fraud investigation units to recover funds that are embezzled in the mental health system.

2. Clinical and financial audits of all government-run and private psychiatric facilities that receive government subsidies or insurance payments should be done to ensure accountability; statistics on admissions, treatment and deaths, without breaching patient confidentiality, should be compiled for review.

3. A list of convicted psychiatrists and mental health workers, especially those convicted and/or disciplined for fraud and sexual abuse should be kept on state, national and international law enforcement and police agencies databases, to prevent criminally convicted and/or de-registered mental health practitioners from gaining employment elsewhere in the mental health field.

4. No convicted mental health practitioner should be employed by government agencies, especially in correctional/prison facilities or schools.

5. The DSM and/or lCD (mental disorders section) should be removed from use in all government agencies, departments and other bodies including criminal, educational and justice systems.

6. Establish rights for patients and their insurance companies to receive refunds for mental health treatment which did not achieve the promised result or improvement, or which resulted in proven harm to the individual, thereby ensuring that responsibility lies with the individual practitioner and psychiatric facility rather than the government or its agencies.

7. None of the mental disorders in the DSM/ICD should be eligible for insurance coverage because they have no scientific, physical validation. Governmental, criminal, educational and judicial agencies should not rely on the DSM or lCD (mental disorders section).

8. Provide funding and insurance coverage only for proven, workable treatments that verifiably and dramatically improve or cure mental health problems.

We think it is time to call psychiatry and psychology for what they are — failed pseudo sciences with no basis in fact, pseudo sciences that harm their recipients and line the pocketbooks of their practitioners.

War, On Drugs

July 1st, 2016

We thought our subscribers might find this article of interest — “War, On Drugs” by Dr. Peter Frankopan, director of the Oxford Centre for Byzantine Research in the UK. Here is an excerpt:

“Given the well-documented, widespread use of narcotics in modern warfare, it is no surprise to find ISIS also supplying soldiers with stimulants. In the fall of 2015, the largest drug bust in Lebanese history took place at Beirut airport when a Saudi prince tried to board a private jet that was about to fly to Ha’il, in northern Saudi Arabia. Two tons of Captagon were recovered – a drug whose use outside the Middle East is negligible, according to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime.”

“Originally developed in the 1960s, Captagon was designed to treat narcolepsy and attention-deficit disorder. It was banned in most countries because of its addictive nature. Captagon produces feelings of euphoria, a boost in energy and heightened awareness – as well as surging aggression levels, says Richard Rawson, co-director of the Integrated Substance Abuse Programme at the University of California, Los Angeles. A Reuters report from 2014 demonstrated just how widespread the use of drugs has become in Syria since the start of the civil war, and especially how production of stimulants for use by rebel and ISIS forces has soared. The fact that the levels of violence have risen, too – not only with videotaped beheadings, but also mass executions and indiscriminate slaughter – might not be entirely coincidental.”

Terrorism is created; it is not human nature. Suicide bombers are made, not born. Ultimately, terrorism is the result of madmen bent on destruction, and these madmen are typically the result of psychiatric or psychological techniques aimed at mind and behavioral control. Suicide bombers are not rational—they are weak and pliant individuals psychologically indoctrinated to murder innocent people without compassion, with no concern for the value of their own lives. They are manufactured assassins.

Part of that process involves the use of mind–altering psychiatric drugs.

Click here for more information about Psychiatry and Terrorism.


May 22nd, 2016


August 25-28, 2016
Pointe Hilton Squaw Peak Resort
Phoenix, Arizona
Registration form at www.narpa.org

Conference Keynotes and Highlights

Robert Whitaker, Author
Psychiatry Under the Influence: Institutional Corruption, Social Injury,
and Prescriptions for Reform and Mad in America

Mort Cohen, J.D., Professor of Law, Golden Gate University
Litigator of Landmark Forced Treatment Cases
Lifelong Champion for the Rights of Marginalized and Disadvantaged Peoples

Caroline White, Social Activist and Survivor
Trainer/Facilitator for Western Massachusetts Recovery Learning Community & Hearing Voices USA

Eve Hill, J.D.
Deputy Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights
U.S. Department of Justice

Peter Lehmann, Publisher and Activist
Co-Editor Journal of Critical Psychology, Counseling, and Psychotherapy
Author, Coming Off Psychiatric Drugs
Founder of Self-Help and Survivor Groups in Germany and Europe

Special Plenary
Arlene Kanter, J.D., L.L.M.
Professor,  Syracuse University School of Law
Recent Developments in Mental Health Law – 2016
Annual plenary by legal scholar presenting updates and interpretation on the most recent legal cases affecting disability rights and mental health law.