Former Top Industry Insider Reveals Big Pharma Secrets

September 28th, 2014

Former Top Industry Insider Reveals Big Pharma Secrets

[From American Free Press Newspaper] “The former managing director of drug giant Eli Lilly and Company in Sweden continues to blow the whistle on the business practices of the pharmaceutical industry, scoring a major victory in announcing that his first book, Side Effects: Death. Confessions of a Pharma-Insider, will be turned into a full-length feature film.

“John Virapen, who began his career with ‘Big Pharma’ in 1968 as a salesman knocking on doctors’ doors, rose through the ranks to realize what he was pitching were not drugs, but death. Virapen was well aware early on that thousands had died or committed suicide by taking the drugs he was pushing. ‘I indirectly contributed to the death of … people, whose shadows now haunt me,’ he explained in his book.

[From Amazon.com] “I bribed a Swedish professor to enhance the registration of Prozac in Sweden.” -John Virapen

“Pharmaceutical companies want to keep people sick. They want to make others think that they are sick. And they do this for one reason: money. Did you know:
* Pharmaceutical companies invest more than $50,000 per physician each year to get them to prescribe their products?
* More than 75 percent of leading scientists in the field of medicine are ‘paid for’ by the pharmaceutical industry?
* Corruption prevailed in the approval and marketing of drugs in some cases?
* Illnesses are made up by the pharmaceutical industry and specifically marketed to enhance sales and market shares for the companies in question?
* Pharmaceutical companies increasingly target children?

“Side Effects: Death is the true story of corruption, bribery and fraud written by Dr. John Virapen, who has been called THE Big Pharma Insider. During his 35 years in the pharmaceutical industry internationally (most notably as general manager of Eli Lilly and Company in Sweden), Virapen was responsible for the marketing of several drugs, all of them with side effects. Now, Virapen is coming clean and telling all of the little secrets you were never intended to know!”

Now balance this valuable anecdotal account with more of the facts. Download and read these various CCHR booklets to get the truth about psychiatric drugs:

Psychiatric Drugs Create Violence and Suicide
The Link Between Psychiatric Drugs and Senseless Violence
The Truth About Ritalin Abuse
Antianxiety Drugs — the facts about the effects
Antidepressants — the facts about the effects
Antipsychotics — the facts about the effects
Psychostimulants — the facts about the effects
Mood Stabilizers — the facts about the effects

Contrave

September 21st, 2014

Contrave

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a new weight loss drug on September 10. Aren’t you excited? Don’t get your hopes up, we’re going to tell you all the reasons you should not take this drug.

I just lost 10 pounds by eating meat and vegetables for a month. I temporarily gave up ice cream and cheese, also. Why do you care about my diet? Because with Contrave you only get the best results by combining the drug with a non-drug weight management program (that is, proper diet and exercise.) Test results show that Contrave drug users might lose an average of 8 pounds more over 6 months than those losing weight without the drug, with both groups also doing a non-drug weight management program. The experts say that if you just use the drug with no changes in diet or exercise, it is not going to be successful. So why not just save yourself $200 a month and go with the non-drug weight management program?

OK, so some of the test results show that on average people on the drug lost 4% more weight over a year than those on a placebo, while doing the same non-drug weight management things. So how is Contrave supposed to work?

Well, funny thing about that. No one has a real clue about how Contrave works or doesn’t work. The best they can say is that sometimes it lessens one’s appetite. There is no way to predict the results, it is strictly trial and error.

There are not that many weight loss drugs on the market, leading some doctors to joke about slim pickings for the treatment of obesity. There is also controversy about whether obesity is really a medical condition or a symptom of a medical condition. In any case, let’s not follow all these red herrings and just describe this particular drug in more depth.

The FDA rejected the first approval request in 2011 for Contrave, and has given approval this year only with two additional requirements — more safety studies are needed, and the drug must carry a boxed warning about the risk of suicide and other bad side effects.

Suicide risk? Really? For weight loss? What kind of a drug is this?

Guess what, Contrave is a psychiatric drug. Two psych drugs in combination, actually. Contrave is a combination of bupropion (Wellbutrin), and naltrexone. The recommended daily dose is a total of 32 mg naltrexone and 360 mg bupropion.

You may recall that Wellbutrin is an antidepressant; as a short-acting antidepressant and amphetamine-like drug similar to Ritalin and Dexedrine, it is also marketed in slow-release form as Zyban for people trying to quit smoking.

The FDA approved Wellbutrin as an antidepressant in 1985 but because of the significant incidence of seizures at the originally recommended dose (400-600 mg), the drug was withdrawn in 1986. It was reintroduced in 1989 with a maximum dose of 450 mg per day.

It can cause seizures and at rates of four times that of other antidepressants. Fatal heart attacks in those with a history of heart-rhythm disturbances have occurred. Other side effects include agitation, insomnia, increased restlessness, anxiety, delusions, hallucinations, psychotic episodes, confusion, weight loss and paranoia. Teens have abused the drug by crushing and snorting it, causing seizures. So, we can see that weight loss is one of the possible side effects of Wellbutrin; only in the context of an antidepressant or smoking cessation drug, weight loss is an unwanted side effect. So why not change the name and market it as a weight loss drug?

Naltrexone, on the other hand, is an anti-addiction drug, technically an opioid receptor antagonist. It is FDA approved to treat alcohol and opioid dependence, although it must not be used if the person is still taking alcohol or opioids, as it can induce severe withdrawal symptoms. It also has side effects of depression and suicidal thoughts or suicide. I can believe it might suppress one’s appetite, as well.

I think I’ll just go buy some ice cream and drown my visions of weight loss in a sugar coma.

The Deadliest Enemy

September 7th, 2014

The Deadliest Enemy

is the one you never suspect

“The use of psychotropic drugs, especially combined use of antipsychotic and antidepressant drugs, is strongly associated with an increased risk of SCD [Sudden Cardiac Death].” —European Heart Journal

“Prior to the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, the use of prescribed antidepressant and antipsychotic drugs was never part of military policy.

“In a June 2010 report, the latest available on the subject, the Defense Department’s Pharmacoeconomic Center noted that 213,972, or 20 percent of the 1.1 million active-duty troops surveyed, were taking some form of psychotropic drug.

“Since that report was released, those figures have greatly increased and are now considerably beyond the 20 percent level for psychiatric medications prescribed to active-duty soldiers. These are precisely the sort of drugs cited in an overwhelming majority of veteran suicides.

“These substances significantly impair motor skills and reaction times, and cause confusion, disorientation and forgetfulness—critical damage to a skill set vital to soldiers in combat.

“Other numbers are even more staggering, showing that the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs poured more than $4.5 billion into purchases of antidepressants, antipsychotics and anti-anxiety drugs in the decade after 9/11. The mass prescribing of these dangerous drugs continues in high gear once the soldier, sailor, Marine or airman comes under the authority of the Department of Veterans Affairs.

“In return for the billions of dollars spent on these substances, suicides and cases of sudden cardiac arrest have soared.”

Click here to read the full report on deaths in the military due to psychotropic drugs.

If you are in the military, a veteran, a member of a military or veteran support group, or family or associate of a member of the military or a veteran, you quality for a free Hidden Enemy DVD. Fill out this form to receive a free DVD.

You can also watch the full Hidden Enemy documentary here:

Behavioral Health in St. Louis

September 1st, 2014

Behavioral Health

It used to be called “mental health.”

The so-called “stigma” of mental health now prompts a name change, and they are starting to call it “behavioral health,” which just means how effectively one handles stress.

There isn’t any stigma, of course. Stigma is manufactured by the psycho-pharmaceutical industry so that there is a bad-sounding social issue for which research funds can be solicited and psychotropic drugs sold to unsuspecting victims, and for which reports can be written about how bad it all is.

We call it propaganda by redefinition of words, which is a way to mold public opinion by altering words to obtain a public relations advantage.

Behavior: The way in which one acts or conducts oneself, especially toward others, or in response to a particular situation [late Middle English from be-have in the sense of "have or bear (oneself) in a particular way".]

The implication is that “behavior” is troublesome and must be corrected; one’s behavioral health, then, is amiss, requiring psychiatric treatment.

A primary strategy of behavioral health is the extension of services into the community — at home, school, workplace and other community settings.

Recently, the “crisis in Ferguson, Missouri” is a field day for behavioral health therapists. Misbehaving people (whether the police or the populace, take your pick) are thus desperately in need of treatment; and the stress of dealing with this misbehavior for the rest of us means we also need some “behavioral health” treatments.

One truly hopes you recognize tongue firmly in cheek here.

Misconduct or misbehavior exhibit a lack of environmental control by all parties concerned. Such control begins with the individual managing and controlling his own environment — his person, his things, his behavior. We usually just call this “competence.” When a group messes up to such an extent as witnessed in Ferguson, look to the sanity of their leaders, who have allowed those under their care to deteriorate to such an extent that they can no longer handle the stress of their environment.

Unfortunately, psychiatry does not have an answer here other than more drugs, further suppressing one’s ability to deal with stress in their environment.

What is the proper response? Put order into the environment. Locate and handle the insane ones who are provoking the stress, or just letting it happen. Locate and handle those pushing psychiatric solutions, such as the “behavioral health” people at local hospitals and universities who promote electro-convulsive therapy as a solution to behavior.

The Saint Louis Mental Health Board is a special tax district in the City of St. Louis as set forth by state statute, and consider themselves the mental health authority for the City of St. Louis, funding 48 different agencies with community programs, community projects, community partnerships and other initiatives that are supposed to help residents improve their behavioral health. Since their inception in 1992 they have proudly spent $111,769,998 on such programs. They financially support the publication of the Vision for Children at Risk “Children of Metropolitan St. Louis” report, which gathers statistics on 28 indicators of well-being for children under 18 by zip code; the primary zip code for Ferguson is 63135, in case you would like to review it.

Gee whiz, our children need a lot of behavioral health help!

Is it working?

Doesn’t appear to be.

But they sure know how to write reports!

Your task is to contact your local, state and federal officials and representatives, and let them know what you think about this. Provide your personal observations and experiences. Suggest that they stop funding failed psychiatric treatments, mental health programs, and behavioral health community initiatives — and do something effective, like teaching children to read.

The Link Between Psychiatric Drugs and Senseless Violence

August 24th, 2014

The Link Between Psychiatric Drugs and Senseless Violence

There is overwhelming evidence that psychiatric drugs cause violence: 22 international drug regulatory warnings cite violence, mania, hostility, aggression, psychosis and even homicidal ideation. Individuals under the influence of such drugs and committing these acts of senseless violence are not limited to using guns and are not limited to just schools.

There have been 10 studies in four countries on psychiatric drug-induced violence.

At least 34 school shootings and/or school-related acts of violence have been committed by those taking or withdrawing from psychiatric drugs resulting in 166 wounded and 78 killed (in other school shootings, information about their drug use was never made public—neither confirming or refuting if they were under the influence of prescribed drugs). The list includes not only mass shootings, but the use of knives, swords and bombs.

School-related acts of violence aren’t the only cases commonly found to be under the influence of psychiatric drugs. There are 18 other recent acts of senseless violence committed by individuals taking or withdrawing from psychiatric drugs resulting in an additional 76 dead and 61 wounded.

Between 2004 and 2012, there have been 14,773 reports to the U.S. FDA’s MedWatch system on psychiatric drugs causing violent side effects including: 1,531 cases of homicidal ideation/homicide, 3,287 cases of mania & 8,219 cases of aggression. (Note: By the FDA’s own admission, less than 1% of side effects are ever reported to it, so the actual numbers of side effects occurring are most certainly higher.)

While there is never one simple explanation for what drives a human being to commit such unspeakable acts of violence, all too often one common denominator has surfaced in hundreds of cases—prescribed psychiatric drugs which are documented to cause mania, psychosis, violence, suicide and in some cases, homicidal ideation. To date, there has been no federal investigation of the link between psychiatric drugs and acts of violence.

For more evidence on the link between psychiatric drugs and violence, download and read the booklet “The Link Between Psychiatric Drugs and Senseless Violence”.

California Medical Evaluation Field Manual

August 17th, 2014

California Medical Evaluation Field Manual

In 1991, Dr. Lorrin M. Koran prepared the Medical Evaluation Field Manual at the request of the California legislature.

Quoting from the Introduction:


“This Field Manual shows California mental health program administrators and staff how to screen their patients for active, important physical diseases. The Manual explains how, where, and when to screen, how to initiate and staff a screening program, and how to maximize its cost-effectiveness. The Manual also includes a list of clinical findings that characterize patients whose mental symptoms are quite likely to be caused by an unrecognized physical disease.

“For several reasons, mental health professionals working within a mental health system have a professional and a legal obligation to recognize the presence of physical disease in their patients. First, physical diseases may cause a patient’s mental disorder. Second, physical disease may worsen a mental disorder, either by affecting brain function or by giving rise to a psychopathologic reaction. Third, mentally ill patients are often unable or unwilling to seek medical care and may harbor a great deal of undiscovered physical disease. Finally, a patient’s visit to a mental health program creates an opportunity to screen for physical disease in a symptomatic population. The yield of disease from such screening is usually higher than the yield in an asymptomatic population.”


The conclusions drawn in this manual are not theoretical; they were arrived at by extensive experimental evidence, and include such findings as:

“1. Nearly two out of five patients (39%) had an active, important physical disease.

“2. The mental health system had failed to detect these diseases in nearly half (47.5%) of the affected patients.

“3. Of all the patients examined, one in six had a physical disease that was related to his or her mental disorder, either causing or exacerbating that disorder.

“4. The mental health system had failed to detect one in six physical diseases that were causing a patient’s mental disorder.

“5. The mental health system had failed to detect more than half of the physical diseases that were exacerbating a patient’s mental disorder.”

The step-by-step procedures in this manual detected more physical diseases than the mental health programs had detected among 476 patients sampled, did so at a lower cost per diagnosed case, and can be performed by mental health personnel after very limited training.

Why Is This Important?

CCHR has always recommended a full, searching medical examination by a non-psychiatric health care professional, with appropriate clinical tests, to determine if there are undetected and untreated medical conditions that could be causing or contributing to mental distress.

The Missouri Department of Mental Health, with the recent passage of Senate Bill 716, is now instructed to develop guidelines for the screening and assessment of persons that address the interaction between physical and mental health to ensure that all potential causes of changes in behavior or mental status caused by or associated with a medical condition are assessed. This legislation goes into effect August 28, 2014.

One expects that this implies that those medical conditions found would then be medically treated, rather than simply passing out harmful and addictive psychotropic drugs, as is the more usual practice. We need to reinforce this expectation with our contacts, calls and letters to the Missouri DMH.

If you have professional expertise for helping to develop such guidelines, please volunteer your efforts to the Missouri Department of Mental Health.

If you would like to read the California Medical Evaluation Field Manual, you may download it from the CCHR St. Louis website.

War and Psychiatrists

August 5th, 2014

War and Psychiatrists

We like to acquaint our readers with interesting things we read, and then work out how psychiatry is involved. The most recent interesting thing we have read (although not the most interesting thing in the world) is an article titled “The Truth About Iraq And why it matters” by Dick Cheney and Liz Cheney, in the July 21, 2014 issue of The Weekly Standard. (Click here to read the article.)

Keep in mind, we are not arguing for or against the Cheneys’ viewpoints; that is something about which one must come to one’s own conclusions. However, we’d like to take two quotes from the article, out of context to be sure, and expound on the issue as it relates to psychiatry.

Quote the first: “We also know, again confirmed in documents captured after the war, that Saddam provided funding, training, and other support to numerous terrorist organizations and individuals over decades, including to Ayman al Zawahiri, the man who leads al Qaeda today.”

A relatively innocuous statement, perhaps — but not to someone who recognizes the name and its relation to psychiatry (which the authors may not recognize, or may not consider significant.)

Here’s the point. Very few may know about an Egyptian psychiatrist, formerly Osama bin Laden’s right hand man, named Ayman al-Zawahiri. Former psychiatrist Ayman al-Zawahiri “is the guy—he’s the operational commander … number one, on the right-hand side of Osama [bin Laden] … He believes that violence is purifying.” [Vincent Cannistraro, former counter-terrorism official, U.S. Central Intelligence Agency]

Ayman al-ZawahiriWell, so bin Laden is now out of the picture, but al-Zawahiri is not.

A psychiatrist and surgeon who was convicted of terrorism in Egypt and sentenced to death in absentia; al-Zawahiri studied behavior, psychology and pharmacology as part of his medical degree at Cairo University. Interpol issued an arrest warrant for al-Zawahiri relating to his role in the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon.

Quote the second: “We won’t defeat our enemies by retreating. We won’t win if we adopt a false narrative about the past, fail to learn the lessons of history, or seek security in disengagement and isolationism. We will only defeat our enemies if we are clear-eyed about the threat and have the will to do what it takes for as long as it takes—until the war is won.”

Cheney was talking about Iraq and al Qaeda. We’re talking about war, terrorism and psychiatry. We think this quote still applies. What do you think?

Find out more about war, terrorism and psychiatry by clicking here.

Missouri Governor Signs Two Anti-Psych Bills

July 31st, 2014

Missouri Governor Signs Two Anti-Psych Bills

SS SCS SB 532 (Senate Substitute for Senate Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 532) – Modifies provisions relating to educational and medical consent provided by relative caregivers. Signed by Governor Nixon 7/9/2014; goes into effect 28 August 2014.

This act allows relative caregivers, acting under an affidavit, to consent to medical treatment and educational services for a minor child with whom such caregiver lives if consent of the legal parent or guardian cannot be obtained through reasonable efforts. A parent may also delegate such consent authority to the relative caregiver in writing. “Relative caregiver” is defined as a competent adult who is related by blood, marriage or adoption, who is not the legal parent or guardian and who represents in the affidavit that the child lives with the adult and that the adult is responsible for the care of the child.

This is an important protection as it prevents consent for medical treatment, including psychiatric treatment, from defaulting to the state if the parent is not available.

CCS#2 HCS SCS SB 716 (Conference Committee Substitute No. 2 for House Committee Substitute for Senate Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 716) – Modifies provisions relating to public health. Signed by Governor Nixon 7/10/2014; goes into effect 28 August 2014.

VULNERABLE PERSON ABUSE INVESTIGATIONS (Sections 630.017 and Section 2)

This act provides that upon receipt of a report of possible vulnerable person abuse, the Department of Mental Health shall initiate an investigation within 24 hours and shall complete all investigations within 60 days, unless good cause for the failure to complete the investigation is documented.

For investigations alleging neglect of a patient, resident, or client, the guardian shall be notified of the investigation and given an opportunity to provide information to the investigators; the results of the investigation shall be provided to the guardian within five working days of its completion. The department of mental health shall obtain two independent reviews of all patient, resident, or client deaths that it investigates.

This act also requires the department of mental health to develop guidelines for the screening and assessment of persons receiving services from the Department that address the interaction between physical and mental health to ensure that all potential causes of changes in behavior or mental status caused by or associated with a medical condition are assessed. The provisions of this act relating to screening and assessments shall only apply to state owned or operated facilities and not to long-term care facilities or hospitals.

This is an important change in the law as it recognizes that mental symptoms can be caused by physical issues and requires the Missouri Department of Mental Health to assess persons for medical conditions and not just for mental symptoms. If you know someone who might have input into such guidelines, now is the time to have them contact the DMH. California developed such guidelines in 1991, called the Medical Evaluation Field Manual, which will be the subject of a future newsletter.

Texas Foster Children Health Care News

July 27th, 2014

Texas Foster Children Health Care News

Legislation signed by the Governor of Texas and effective starting 9/1/2013 provides expanded safeguards for foster children in Texas regarding their health care.

HB 915 (House Bill 915) should be taken strongly to heart by all state legislatures.

Here are some of the important points safeguarding foster children from dangerous psychotropic drugs. We have paraphrased the legalese to make it easier to read. The actual bill text can be found here.

Duties required by a guardian ad litem appointed for a child include reviewing the medical care provided to the child, and in a developmentally appropriate manner, elicit the child’s opinion on the medical care provided. For a child at least 16 years of age, advise the child of the child’s right to request the court to authorize the child to consent to the child’s own medical care.

For a child receiving psychotropic medication, determine whether the child has been provided appropriate psychosocial therapies, behavior strategies, and other non-pharmacological intervention, and has been seen by the prescribing physician, physician assistant, or advanced practice nurse at least once every 90 days.

For a youth taking prescription medication, the department shall ensure that the youth’s transition plan includes provisions to assist the youth in managing the use of the medication and in managing the child’s long-term physical and mental health needs after leaving foster care, including provisions that inform the youth about the use of the medication, the resources that are available to assist the youth in managing the use of the medication, and informed consent and the provision of medical care.

A person may not be authorized to consent to medical care provided to a foster child unless the person has completed a department-approved training program related to informed consent. The training required must include training related to informed consent for the administration of psychotropic medication and the appropriate use of psychosocial therapies, behavior strategies, and other non-pharmacological interventions that should be considered before or concurrently with the administration of psychotropic medications.

Consent to the administration of a psychotropic medication is  valid only if the consent is given voluntarily and without undue influence, and the person authorized by law to consent for the foster child receives verbally or in writing information that describes the specific condition to be treated, the beneficial effects on that condition expected from the medication, the probable health and mental health consequences of not consenting to the medication, the probable clinically significant side effects and risks associated with the medication, and the generally accepted alternative medications and non-pharmacological interventions to the medication, if any, and the reasons for the proposed course of treatment.

The department shall notify the child’s parents of the initial prescription of a psychotropic medication to a foster child and of any change in dosage of the psychotropic medication at the first scheduled meeting between the parents and the child’s caseworker after the date the psychotropic medication is prescribed or the dosage is changed.

The person authorized to consent to medical treatment for a foster child prescribed a psychotropic medication shall ensure that the child has been seen by the prescribing physician, physician assistant, or advanced practice nurse at least once every 90 days to allow the physician, physician assistant, or advanced practice nurse to appropriately monitor the side effects of the medication, and determine whether the medication is helping the child achieve the treatment goals, and continued use of the medication is appropriate.

Note the emphasis on Informed Consent. Click here for more information about Informed Consent.

The real problem is that psychiatrists fraudulently diagnose life’s problems as an “illness”, and stigmatize unwanted behavior or study problems as “diseases.” Psychiatry’s stigmatizing labels, programs and treatments are harmful junk science; their diagnoses of “mental disorders” are a hoax — unscientific, fraudulent and harmful. All psychiatric treatments, not just psychiatric drugs, are dangerous.

Contact your own state legislators and suggest that they review this Texas legislation and additional information about Informed Consent so that they may compare it to existing state laws on the matter and provide needed protections for children under state care. In Missouri, visit here to find your legislators.

 

Psychiatric drug ER trips approach 90,000 a year

July 19th, 2014

Psychiatric drug ER trips approach 90,000 a year

“Bad reactions to psychiatric drugs result in nearly 90,000 emergency room visits each year by U.S. adults, with anti-anxiety medicines and sedatives among the most common culprits.

“A drug used in some popular sleeping pills was among the most commonly involved sedatives, especially in adults aged 65 and older.

“Most of the visits were for troublesome side effects or accidental overdoses and almost 1 in 5 resulted in hospitalization.

“The results come from an analysis of 2009-2011 medical records from 63 hospitals that participate in a nationally representative government surveillance project. The study was published [July 9, 2014] in JAMA Psychiatry.

“Overall, the sedative zolpidem tartrate, contained in Ambien and some other sleeping pills, was involved in almost 12 percent of all ER visits and in 1 out of 5 visits for older adults.”

Read the full MSN News article here.

An unexpected finding of the study was that rates of antipsychotic, sedative, anti-anxiety, and antidepressant adverse drug event emergency room visits were highest among adults aged 19 to 44 years.

We expect that most people do not realize that Ambien is a psychiatric drug, since it is usually prescribed as a sedative for insomnia. In fact, drugs of this nature are variously called “anti-anxiety drugs” or “minor tranquilizers” or “sedative hypnotics.”

Today, at least 20 million people worldwide are prescribed these “minor tranquilizers.”

Daily use of therapeutic doses is associated with physical dependence. Addiction can occur after 14 days of regular use. Of the 72 different reported adverse reactions, some are anxiety, hostility, aggression, depression, sleep-walking, sleep-driving, and suicide. The typical consequences of withdrawal are anxiety, depression, sweating, cramps, nausea, psychotic reactions and seizures. Elderly people taking these drugs for anxiety or insomnia are at increased risk for motor vehicle crashes. There is also a “rebound effect” where the individual experiences even worse symptoms than they started with as a result of chemical dependency; medical experts point out that this is the drug effect, not a “mental illness.”

Courts have determined that informed consent for people who receive prescriptions for psychotropic (mood-altering) drugs must include the doctor providing information about possible side effects and benefits, ways to treat side effects, and risks of other conditions, as well as information about alternative treatments. Yet very often, psychiatrists ignore these requirements.

All patients should first see a non-psychiatric medical doctor, especially one who is familiar with nutritional needs, who should obtain and review a thorough medical history and conduct a complete physical exam, ruling out all the possible problems that might cause the person’s symptoms.

There are far too many effective options to list them all here. Psychiatrists, on the other hand, insist there are no such options and fight to keep it that way. Patients and physicians must urge their local, state and federal government representatives to endorse and fund non-drug health care options instead of dangerous psychiatric drugs.