Posts Tagged ‘restraints’

Putting Profit Above Children’s Lives

Monday, August 30th, 2021

The child mental health industry is a system that puts profit above children’s lives, preying on unsuspecting parents and taking advantage of disadvantaged children, such as those covered under Medicaid (state and federal health coverage for lower income families and those with disabilities). It is rife with abuse, yet this hugely profitable industry is rarely held to account for its rampant abuse of our most vulnerable—children.

It is an industry which milks the foster care system for huge profit, where children are four times more likely to be given mind-altering psychotropic drugs than non-foster care children, and much more likely to be prescribed cocktails of these drugs.

It is an industry that electroshocks children including babies, using state funds for lower income families (Medicaid).

It is a business masquerading as healthcare which sells parents and legislators on the idea of helping troubled children. Yet this help is more often simply incarcerating children in behavioral schools or psychiatric wards, where treatment consists of psychiatric drug cocktails, degradation, solitary confinement, and brutal restraint procedures which have killed children. And all of this is done under the guise of helping children.

The abuse is not limited to one chain of psychiatric facilities or one mode of psychiatric behavioral “treatment.” This abuse in the child mental health industry is systemic—yet unknown to most of the public.

For example: Information obtained through the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) reveals that 19 states are currently administering electroshock to children, with 7 of those states electroshocking children aged 0-5 years old. These are all children being electroshocked while psychiatrists and facilities bill Medicaid for their “treatment.”

Yet another example — Only one month after the world witnessed the tragic death of George Floyd, unable to breathe as he was physically restrained and held to the ground, 16-year-old Cornelius Frederick, an African American, was physically restrained at Sequel Youth & Family Services’ facility in Michigan, and also cried out, “I can’t breathe!” before passing out. Thirty hours later, on May 1, 2020, he was dead. Cornelius had gone into cardiac arrest while being restrained by Lakeside Academy staff, a residential psychiatric facility that treated foster care and other kids with behavioral issues. A witness to Cornelius’s restraint said, “[T]his kid threw a sandwich. He was being unruly and they couldn’t control him. So, four guys…the size of rugby players tackled him.”

Cornelius is not alone; countless children have suffocated and died after being subjected to deadly restraints within these psychiatric facilities and behavioral treatment centers.

This is not healthcare. This is child abuse. And it is just the tip of the iceberg.

Please help us to support the cause and end the abuse of children in the psychiatric industry. We are making incredible progress, as many of the psychiatric facilities abusing these children are now under investigation. And many state legislators want to put an end to this abuse. There is more to be done, and so we ask you to continue to support our Fight For Kids campaign. Please support the cause and also watch our latest video here.

For more information, visit our Child Psychiatric Treatment page here.

Childhood Is Not A Mental Disorder

Child Psychiatric Treatment—Drugs, Solitary Confinement, Torture and Abuse

Wednesday, November 4th, 2020

This Is Why We Fight For Kids

THERE CAN BE NO KEENER REVELATION OF A SOCIETY’S SOUL THAN THE WAY IN WHICH IT TREATS ITS CHILDREN.” — NELSON MANDELA

The child mental health industry is a system that puts profit above children’s lives, preying on unsuspecting parents and taking advantage of disadvantaged children, such as those covered under Medicaid (state and federal health coverage for lower income families and those with disabilities). It is rife with abuse, yet this hugely profitable industry is rarely held to account for its rampant abuse of our most vulnerable—children.

It is an industry which milks the foster care system for huge profit, where children are four times more likely to be given mind-altering psychotropic drugs than non-foster care children, and much more likely to be prescribed cocktails of these drugs.

It is an industry that electroshocks children including babies, using state funds for lower income families (Medicaid).

It is a business masquerading as healthcare which sells parents and legislators on the idea of helping troubled children. Yet this help is more often simply incarcerating children in behavioral schools or psychiatric wards, where treatment consists of psychiatric drug cocktails, degradation, solitary confinement, and brutal restraint procedures which have killed children. And all of this is done under the guise of helping children.

THE ABUSE IS NOT LIMITED TO ONE CHAIN OF PSYCHIATRIC FACILITIES OR ONE MODE OF PSYCHIATRIC OR BEHAVIORAL “TREATMENT.” THE ABUSE, WHICH PROLIFERATES THE CHILD MENTAL HEALTH INDUSTRY, IS SYSTEMIC—YET UNKNOWN TO MOST OF THE PUBLIC.

For example: Information obtained through the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) reveals that 19 states are currently administering electroshock to children, with 7 of those states electroshocking children aged 0-5 years old. These are all children being electroshocked while psychiatrists and facilities bill Medicaid for their “treatment.”

Yet another example—Only one month after the world witnessed the tragic death of George Floyd, unable to breathe as he was physically restrained and held to the ground, 16-year-old Cornelius Frederick, an African American, was physically restrained at Sequel Youth & Family Services’ facility in Michigan, and also cried out, “I can’t breathe!” before passing out. Thirty hours later, on May 1, 2020, he was dead. Cornelius had gone into cardiac arrest while being restrained by Lakeside Academy staff, a residential psychiatric facility that treated foster care and other kids with behavioral issues. A witness to Cornelius’s restraint said, “[T]his kid threw a sandwich. He was being unruly and they couldn’t control him. So, four guys…the size of rugby players tackled him.”

Cornelius is not alone; countless children have suffocated and died after being subjected to deadly restraints within these psychiatric facilities and behavioral treatment centers.

This is not healthcare. This is child abuse. And it is just the tip of the iceberg.

Therefore, please avail yourself of the information presented on our Fight For Kids website. Until enough people become aware of mental health industry abuse of children and teens, and arm themselves with the facts to protect not only their own children, but advocate for those who have no voice, it will continue. The profits will keep rolling in, parents will suffer and children will be abused.

This is the Fight For Kids.

And it is only possible through your support.

Order versus Disorder

Saturday, September 29th, 2018

Shades of Your High School Physics Class

You may have encountered this word before — entropy.

Stick with us, we’re going to make it simple.

Basically, without getting all scientific about it, the word means “the degree of disorder or uncertainty in a system”. It comes from the Greek roots en– (within) and trop– (change, turn).

This physical universe tends toward disorder, or increasing entropy. In other words, if you leave the universe alone, it will get more disordered on its own. Things break down; it gets harder to predict the future.

Living Beings Create Order

Living beings, however, have an ability to put order into something — decreasing entropy in their local environments. Birds pick up disorderly litter and build cozy nests; spiders spin intricately patterned webs out of threads; plants grow specialized whorls of colorful petals out of basic chemicals.

And of course, sane and competent human beings put order continuously into everything around them. Sweeping up litter; making their beds; filing papers; putting all the same-sized paper clips into the same box; putting a tool back in the same place it was found; stringing random sounds together into symphonies; making poetry.

You get the idea.

A sane, competent, unaberrated person is an order machine.

But this can go bad. An insane, incompetent, aberrated person is a disorder machine. There are reasons this happens, which is not really the focus or purpose of this missive. Suffice to say that there are ways to correct this and rehabilitate one’s desire and ability to create order.

Psychiatry Creates Disorder

The real reason we discuss this at all is because the psychiatric mental health care industry is a disorder machine. This is something you need to know.  Consider the litany of psychiatric treatments —

1. Psychiatric drugs interrupt the normal functioning of the body and mind. Drugs break into, in most cases, the routine rhythmic flows and activities of the nervous system. Sure, the suppression of unwanted pains or emotions may seem to be an improvement, but the body can only take so much. Quickly or slowly, the systems break down. Human physiology was not designed for the continuous manufacture of euphoric, tranquilizing, or antidepressant sensations. Yet it is forced into this enterprise by psychiatric drugs.

Like a car run on rocket fuel, you may be able to get it to run a thousand miles an hour, but the tires, the engine, the internal parts, were never meant for this. The machine flies apart. Bizarre things happen: addiction, exhaustion, diminished sexual desire, trembling, nightmares, hallucinations, and psychosis. Side effects are, in fact, the body’s natural response to having a chemical disrupt its normal functioning. Once the drug has worn off, the original problem remains. As a solution or cure to life’s problems, psychotropic drugs do not work. They cause disorder.

2. Electro-Convulsive Therapy (ECT), or shock therapy, interrupts the normal functioning of the brain. ECT creates a nerve–wracking convulsion of long duration. And it leaves irreversible brain damage and disorder. Why, then, is it used so frequently? There are two reasons. 1) It is lucrative, and 2) The actual purpose of shock treatment is to create brain damage. In 1942, the psychiatrist Abraham Myerson said: “The reduction of intelligence is an important factor in the curative process.” Creating disorder, ECT makes a patient for life, ensuring continued income for psychiatry.

3. Other direct assaults on the brain — psycho-surgery (cutting out part of the brain); transcranial magnetic stimulation; vagus nerve stimulation — all involve physical damage and disorder to the brain.

4. Physical restraints qualify as “assault and battery” in every respect except one; they are lawful. Psychiatry has placed itself above the law, from where it can assault and batter its unfortunate victims with a complete lack of accountability, all in the name of “treatment.” You might suppose that restraints impose order, since they limit movement, until you consider that they are enforced against one’s will. When you coerce order you get punishment, which is really order gone bad. You might call it “negative order”, because the emotional component is so unpleasant.

5. What about talk therapy? Surely this isn’t brain damaging? Well, done correctly, it is certainly possible to help someone with communication. But consider something like psychiatry’s “cognitive behavioral therapy.” This is not just talking with someone. It is telling the person what’s wrong with them and demanding they change their behavior. Again, coercive therapy is not really therapy, it is causing disorder in the mistaken idea that it will jerk someone out of their problem. It is akin to smacking someone’s thumb with a hammer; they sure won’t be thinking about their mental problems for a while.

So, now that you have some examples of order and disorder, which would you prefer?

The Trick About It

There is one more trick about this that you should know. It may help explain some puzzling things that happen with order and disorder.

When you start to put order into a massive disorder, the original confusion comes into being again. The resolution is to continue putting order into it until the confusion goes away and order reigns.

Let’s give an example. Suppose you have a drawer into which you have dumped many different things over a long time. You open the drawer, but everything is jumbled together and you cannot find what you are looking for. How do you resolve this? One solution is to take the drawer out and dump all its contents onto the floor. You now have a very visible confusion, with everything all mixed up and jumbled about. This confusion may seem daunting, but you persist. You pick up each single thing and put it where it belongs. You continue, putting like or similar things together, and putting them where they belong. Eventually, everything is in its proper place, the drawer is completely in order, and you have found what you were looking for.

Let’s apply this to the field of mental health care, which is a confused mess because psychiatrists are deliberately mucking it up with drugs and other harmful treatments.

You start to put some order into it by getting some patients’ rights laws passed, taking away some of the psychiatric funding for abusive practices, and jailing some criminal psychiatrists who are electroshocking and drugging children. All of a sudden, the news is full of articles about how hopeless mental health care is, how suicide is a big problem, how more funding is needed, how drugs and shock are miracle cures, and how psychiatrists are the salvation of society.

The original confusion is starting to blow off and the perpetrators become visible.

You continue exposing psychiatric fraud and abuses, improving patients’ rights, cutting Medicaid funding for psychiatric drugging of foster children, and jailing psychiatrists who rape their patients. Eventually, psychiatry comes under the law, mental health care starts to improve, traumatized people get better, doctors stop giving children psychiatric drugs, the suicide rate declines, and society starts to get back on track.

Where do you think we are in this process? Do you get the idea we need your help to put some order back into the mental health care system? It’s time for you to Find Out and Fight Back!

Nursing Home Abuses

Thursday, July 25th, 2013

Nursing Home Abuses

The June 2013 issue of Consumer Reports magazine had this to say about antipsychotic drugs given to nursing home patients:

“These and related drugs are supposed to be used only for patients with diagnosed psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia and not for disciplinary reasons such as quelling agitation in patients with Alzheimer’s dementia. In a large 2010 study, almost 30 percent of nursing-home residents had received an antipsychotic; of them, almost one-third had no identified indication for use. The drugs don’t help dementia and have been linked to other risks, including less functional improvement, longer nursing-home stays, and a greater chance of dying. A review published in March by the Cochrane Collaboration concluded that most older adults with dementia can successfully be taken off antipsychotic drugs.”

Nursing-home residents have human rights protected by law. The Consumer Reports article goes on to say that “some nursing homes disregard the law, and often they get away with it. One reason is that residents or their families might be reluctant to make a formal complaint because they fear the staff will retaliate.”

In Missouri the Long Term Care Ombudsman Program provides support and assistance with any problems or complaints regarding residents of nursing homes and residential care facilities. Complaints concerning abuse, neglect and financial exploitation should be reported to the Missouri Division of Senior Services Elder Abuse Hotline, 800-392-0210, email address LTCOmbudsman@health.mo.gov.

In the U.S., 65-year-olds receive 360% more shock treatments that 64-year-olds because at age 65 government Medicare insurance coverage for shock typically takes effect.

Indiscriminate use of psychiatric drugs, electric shock, and violent restraints on the elderly are responsible for much needless suffering.

This abuse is the result of psychiatry maneuvering itself into an authoritative position over aged care. From there, psychiatry has broadly perpetrated the tragic but lucrative hoax that aging is a mental disorder requiring extensive and expensive psychiatric services. For example, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) labels Alzheimer’s Dementia as a mental disorder, even though this is a physical illness and the proper domain of neurologists. Medical experts say that 99% of Alzheimer’s cases do not belong in psychiatric “care.”

In most cases, the elderly are merely suffering from physical problems related to their age, but psychiatry claims that they are manifesting symptoms of dementia which necessitates “treatment” in a nursing home or psychiatric hospital. This is then used to involuntarily commit the elderly to a psychiatric facility, take control of their finances, override their wishes regarding their business, property or health care needs and defraud their health insurance.

If an elderly person in your environment is displaying symptoms of mental trauma or unusual behavior, ensure that he or she gets competent medical care from a non-psychiatric doctor. Insist upon a thorough physical examination to determine whether an underlying undiagnosed physical problem is causing the condition.

Contact your local, state and federal representatives and let them know what you think about this. Forward this newsletter to your family, friends and associates and recommend they subscribe.

Mental health worker dies after restraining patient

Tuesday, October 4th, 2011

Mental health worker dies after restraining patient

The Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services says a mental health worker at Connecticut Valley Hospital in Middletown died after being involved in restraining an unruly psychiatric patient who was being held to forcibly administer drugs.

We have previously discussed psychiatric restraints and the harm this does to patients, but we have not addressed the harm it can do to psychiatric workers.

Is it any wonder that a patient fought back when five of his “caretakers” held him down to give him psychiatric drugs?

Thousands of people of all ages continue to die from such callous, physical assault in psychiatric facilities across the globe; and now, regrettably, we can add mental health workers to this list.

“Assault” is by definition an attempt or apparent attempt to inflict injury upon another by using unlawful force, along with the ability to injure that person. “Battery” is defined as any unlawful beating or other wrongful physical violence or constraint inflicted on a human being without his consent. Psychiatric restraint procedures, and all other psychiatric procedures for that matter, qualify as “assault and battery” in every respect except one — they are lawful.

Download and read the CCHR report, Deadly Restraints — Psychiatry’s “Therapeutic” Assault — Report and recommendations on the violent and dangerous use of restraints in mental health facilities, and draw your own conclusions about the danger psychiatry poses, not only to our mental health, but to our very lives.