Posts Tagged ‘Psychiatric Drugs’

Is Social Media Turning Us All Into Zombies?

Monday, October 18th, 2021

The debate continues to rage about whether smartphones and their attendant social media are addictive, or even whether they are good or bad for you and your children.

This quote from the November 2021 edition of Reason magazine puts the debate more into perspective:

“In 1936, the government of St. Louis, Missouri, tried to ban car radios because a ‘determined movement’ had become convinced that the radio distracted drivers and caused car accidents. The car radio was widely feared by newspapers, which were competitors and had every incentive to sensationalize the product’s dangers.”

We’re not going to come down on one side or the other, it isn’t our fight; but we can certainly remark on the psychiatric connection.

The psychiatric Connection

Psychiatry assumes any so-called addiction is a medical disease. This is patently false; any such media addiction, real or imagined, is an educational or moral failing. It cannot be usefully addressed with drugs or other harmful psychiatric treatments.

Other forms of addiction currently promoted for treatment by psychiatry and psychology are gaming, substance abuse, gambling, and other impulse control issues such as pyromania, kleptomania and promiscuity. Yes, physical addiction may occur with substance abuse; but there are valid non-psychiatric programs for that.

So what are these various behaviors if they are not mental illnesses? They’re called lapses in education, ethics and morals, and when treated as such there is hope that they can be corrected. Unfortunately, calling them “mental illness” and treating them with psychotropic drugs precludes any possibility of finding out the true root causes and effectively addressing those.

The entirety of psychological and psychiatric addiction programs are founded on the tacit assumptions that mental health “experts” know all about the mind and mental phenomena, know a better way of life, a better value system and how to improve lives beyond the understanding and capability of everyone else in society.

The reality is that these mental health programs are designed to control people towards specific ideological objectives at the expense of the person’s sanity and well-being. Do we really want to institutionalize mandatory psychiatric counseling and screening, which is where all this is heading?

We think the whole thing comes back to what the late Professor Thomas Szasz, co-founder of Citizens Commission on Human Rights, originally had to say about this:
• “The term ‘mental illness’ refers to the undesirable thoughts, feelings, and behaviors of persons. Classifying thoughts, feelings, and behaviors as diseases is a logical and semantic error, like classifying the whale as a fish.”
• “If we recognize that ‘mental illness’ is a metaphor for disapproved thoughts, feelings, and behaviors, we are compelled to recognize as well that the primary function of Psychiatry is to control thought, mood, and behavior.”

These so-called mental disorders are just what psychiatry and psychology have inappropriately labeled as “undesirable behavior.”

The Reason article proposes a reasonable solution: “…can anything be done to combat some of the actual problems with tech addiction? Yes, but the answer isn’t easy or flashy: It’s for parents to exercise greater responsibility, talk to their kids about how much they rely on their phones, and set reasonable limits on screen time.”

What You Can Do

We’d like to encourage our readers to help us fund our efforts to bring sanity to the world of mental health care. The psychs haven’t backed off; they are busy exaggerating any mental health concerns raised by the Covid outbreak, and of course why you should see a psychiatrist and take some harmful and addictive psychiatric drugs.

Click here to send us some love.

‘Insanity’ isn’t an illness. It’s an injury. When more injuries called ‘treatments’ are piled on top of it, it becomes very hard to treat just because the person is now desperately injured. He hurts.

— L. Ron Hubbard, 12/15/1968

WHO Declares “Video Game Addiction” a Mental Health Disorder

Drug-Smart St. Louis Month

Monday, October 11th, 2021

The St. Louis Metro region continues to be the epicenter of the drug overdose epidemic in Missouri and accounted for approximately 55% of all drug overdose deaths in Missouri in 2019 and 2020.

While the majority of these drug-involved deaths involved opioids in St. Louis City and County in 2020, we observe that illegal stimulants were also a major contributor. Unfortunately, legal stimulants, depressants and other prescribed psychotropic drugs can also share in the shame, as violence, suicide and heart attacks are known potential side effects of antidepressants and other psychiatric drugs.

Recreational use of prescription drugs is a serious problem with teens and young adults. National studies show that a teen is more likely to have abused a prescription drug than an illegal street drug. Depressants, opioids and antidepressants are responsible for more overdose deaths (45%) than cocaine, heroin, methamphetamine and amphetamines (39%) combined.

To promote drug education, October 2021 has been proclaimed “Drug-Smart St. Louis Month in St. Louis County, Missouri“:

[L-to-R Stephen Forney, Ellen Maher-Forney, Dr. Sam Page, Moritz Farbstein]

“I, Sam Page, St. Louis County Executive, do hereby proclaim the month of October 2021, as Drug-Smart St. Louis Month in St. Louis County, Missouri, and do hereby recognize the Foundation for a Drug-Free World – St. Louis Chapter, volunteers and St. Louis drug educators and encourage the citizens of St. Louis County to participate in drug education activities.”

The fact missed by most is that psychiatric, mind-altering drugs have been found to be the common factor in an overwhelming number of acts of random senseless violence and suicide. On the surface, the idea of psychiatric treatment, tranquilizers or antidepressants creating hostility and violence may not make sense. After all, they are supposed to make people better, calm and quiet. But the reality is that they can and do create such adverse effects. This is called “Drug Induced Psychosis.”

It could be dangerous to immediately cease taking psychiatric drugs because of potential significant withdrawal side effects. No one should stop taking any psychiatric drug without the advice and assistance of a competent medical doctor.

Psychiatric treatments such as drugs, electric shock and involuntary commitment are supposed to assist people who need help, not kill them. Too often, delinquency, suicide and violence have been falsely attributed to someone’s “mental illness,” when in fact the very psychiatric methods used to “treat” such “illness” are the cause of the problem. In addressing the rise in drug overdoses, senseless violence and suicide in society, the role of psychiatric drugs must be investigated.

Antipsychotic Antics

Wednesday, September 15th, 2021

Paliperidone, sold under the trade name Invega among others, is an atypical antipsychotic. Paliperidone is the primary active metabolite of the older antipsychotic risperidone, although its specific mechanism of action with respect to any psychiatric diagnosis is unknown. It blocks the action of dopamine and serotonin in the brain, which as we’ve previously observed is playing Russian Roulette with the brain.

On September 1, 2021 the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a 6-month injection form of the long-acting atypical antipsychotic paliperidone palmitate (Invega Hafyera, manufactured by Janssen Pharmaceuticals) for the treatment of what is fraudulently diagnosed as schizophrenia in adults.

Adverse reactions, or side effects, can include upper respiratory tract infection, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, seizures, high blood sugar, diabetes, decreased blood pressure, fainting, falls, low white blood cell count, headache, tachycardia, somnolence, insomnia, sexual dysfunction, cough, dystonia, akathisia, muscle rigidity, parkinsonism, weight gain, anxiety, indigestion, constipation, and an increased risk of death in elderly people with dementia-related psychosis.

It can be addictive and have acute withdrawal symptoms (euphemistically called “discontinuation syndrome”), including rapid relapse, nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, restlessness, increased sweating, trouble sleeping, a feeling of the world spinning, numbness, muscle pains, tardive dyskinesia, and psychosis.

The primary reason for prescribing a drug that has only two doses per year is to handle the situation where a patient stops taking their daily prescribed drugs because of their unpleasant side effects.

Psychiatric Fraud

Psychiatrists remain committed to calling “schizophrenia” a mental disorder despite, after a century of research, the complete absence of objective proof that it exists as a physical brain abnormality.

Psychiatry clings tenaciously to antipsychotics as the treatment for “schizophrenia,” despite their proven risks and studies which show that when patients stop taking these drugs, they improve.

The late Professor Thomas Szasz stated that “schizophrenia is defined so vaguely that, in actuality, it is a term often applied to almost any kind of behavior of which the speaker disapproves.”

These are normal people with medical, disciplinary, educational, or spiritual problems that can and must be resolved without recourse to drugs. Deceiving and drugging is not the practice of medicine. It is criminal.

Bear in mind that the drug “treatments” being prescribed are for “disorders” that are not physical illnesses—essentially, they are being prescribed for something that does not exist.

Any medical doctor who takes the time to conduct a thorough physical examination of a child or adult exhibiting signs of what a psychiatrist calls Schizophrenia can find undiagnosed, untreated physical conditions. Any person labeled with so-called Schizophrenia needs to receive a thorough physical examination by a competent medical—not psychiatric—doctor to first determine what underlying physical condition is causing the manifestation.

Any person falsely diagnosed as mentally disordered which results in treatment that harms them should file a complaint with the police and professional licensing bodies and have this investigated. They should seek legal advice about filing a civil suit against any offending psychiatrist and his or her hospital, associations and teaching institutions seeking compensation.

No one denies that people can have difficult problems in their lives, that at times they can be mentally unstable, subject to unreasonable depression, anxiety or panic. Mental health care is therefore both valid and necessary. However, the emphasis must be on workable mental healing methods that improve and strengthen individuals and thereby society by restoring people to personal strength, ability, competence, confidence, stability, responsibility and spiritual well–being. Psychiatric drugs and psychiatric treatments are not workable.

Is That Going To Be A Problem?

Monday, July 12th, 2021

Problems are huge now. Everyone has one or more of them. Seems like everyone accuses someone else of them. They are therefore a ripe subject for our blog. There’s a lot to know about the subject.

Some things to know about Problems

A problem is as important as it is related to survival.
The human mind’s basic purpose is the posing and resolving of problems related to survival.
Problems begin with an unpredictability.
Problems are a necessary component of games.
One might say that the best problem is one that never solves.
The old maxim “If you want something done, give it to a busy person to do,” expresses the idea that a person suffers if they do not have enough problems. A person chafes and grows bored when there is a total lack of problems. Giving a busy person one more thing to do adds to their problems, and thus they suffer less.
On the other hand, enough unsolved problems add up to a huge confusion. The balance between too few problems and too many of them is critical, and varies from person to person and time to time.

Some definitions of the word

Problem:
— A question or puzzle raised for inquiry, consideration, or solution.
— A source of perplexity, distress, or vexation.
— Something or someone difficult to achieve, deal with, or control.
— A matter or situation regarded as unwelcome or harmful and needing to be dealt with and overcome.

[From Greek problema, “obstacle”, from proballein “to throw forward”, from pro- “forward” + ballein “to throw”.]

Even better definitions, ones which lead to methods of resolution, are:
— Two or more opposed purposes; also expressed as Purpose versus Counter-purpose.
— Intention versus Counter-intention.
— Postulate versus Counter-postulate.
— Something that persists because it contains a lie or altered facts, since if it were totally truth it wouldn’t be a problem.

Problems and Creativity

Creation is a primary ability of a person. Unfortunately when a person loses their ability to create, about the only thing they can create is a problem. So somebody comes along and says, “Let’s all be happy and healthy.” Next thing you know, all you can see are problems about being happier or healthier. When the problems get too great to do something about, what happens then? One creates lies, because the lowest order of creation is lying, and the problem will then persist because it contains a lie.

Problems and Psychiatry

Problems are no stranger to psychiatrists. In fact, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is full of problems. (While the DSM itself is a problem, here we mean that many different problems are described in the DSM as mental disorders.)

Let’s give some examples. These are problem-related mental disorders listed in the DSM-5 for which psychiatrists can prescribe harmful and addictive psychotropic drugs:

— Academic or educational problem
— Other problem related to employment
— Other problem related to psychosocial circumstances
— Parent-child relational problem
— Phase of life problem
— Problem related to current military deployment status
— Problem related to lifestyle
— Problem related to living alone
— Problem related to living in a residential institution
— Problems related to multiparity [i.e. five or more childbirths]
— Problems related to other legal circumstances
— Problems related to release from prison
— Problems related to unwanted pregnancy
— Religious or spiritual problem
— Sibling relational problem
— Unspecified housing or economic problem
— Unspecified problem related to social environment
— Unspecified problem related to unspecified psychosocial circumstances

The Problem of Psychiatry

Psychiatry itself is a problem of magnitude. While psychiatry claims to be the arbiter of good and bad mental health, it has demonstrated over many years that it cannot cure any mental problems.

In fact, psychiatry invents the very problems that it then fraudulently claims to handle. Mental “disorders” are voted into and out of existence based on factors that have nothing to do with medicine. Psychiatry admits that it has not proven the cause or source of a single “mental illness;” the DSM is simply a list of symptoms.

Recommendations

The DSM should be removed from use in all government agencies, departments and other bodies including criminal, educational and justice systems. None of the mental disorders in the DSM should be eligible for insurance coverage because they have no scientific, physical validation. Provide funding and insurance coverage only for proven, workable treatments that verifiably and dramatically improve or cure mental health problems.

Contact your local, state and federal officials and representatives to express your viewpoints about this.

Qelbree, The Newest ADHD Drug

Monday, June 21st, 2021

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a new drug April 2, 2021 for treatment of the fraudulent “disease” Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in children ages 6 to 17.

Like many other psychiatric drugs, this one also carries an FDA warning:”Qelbree may increase suicidal thoughts and actions in some children with ADHD, especially within the first few months of treatment or when the dose is changed.”

Qelbree (generic viloxazine hydrochloride) is a non-stimulant drug, although it is a Selective Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitor (sNRI), which means that it is really an antidepressant and is similar in operation to other ADHD drugs such as Strattera. The bottom line is that this class of drugs messes with neurotransmitters in the brain, and taking them is playing Russian Roulette with your brain.

Qelbree is an inhibitor of several Cytochrome P450 enzymes, which may intensify the drug’s side effects especially in combination with certain other drugs.

And again, like other similar psychiatric drugs, “The mechanism of action of viloxazine in the treatment of ADHD is unclear.

There is no valid ADHD clinical test for children. There is no valid ADHD clinical test for adults. The ADHD diagnosis does not identify a genuine biological or psychological disorder. The diagnosis is simply a list of behaviors that may appear disruptive or inappropriate, and is essentially just an opinion.

No one denies that people can have difficult problems in their lives, that at times they can be mentally unstable, subject to unreasonable depression, anxiety or panic. Mental health care is therefore both valid and necessary.
However, the emphasis must be on workable mental healing methods that improve and strengthen individuals and thereby society by restoring people to personal strength, ability, competence, confidence, stability, responsibility and spiritual well-being. Psychiatric drugs and psychiatric treatments are not workable.

ADHD Newborn

Common Sense May Not Be All That Common

Monday, May 10th, 2021

We found a number of useful definitions for the phrase “common sense.”

– Sound and prudent judgment based on a simple perception of the situation or facts.
– An ability to reach intelligent conclusions.
– A reliable ability to judge and decide with soundness, prudence, and intelligence.
– The ability to think and behave in a reasonable way and to make good decisions.
– Good sense and sound judgment in practical matters.
– Sound judgment not based on specialized knowledge.
– The basic level of practical knowledge and judgment that we all need to help us live in a reasonable and safe way.
– Agreement with those perceptions, associations and judgments possessed of the generality of mankind. With respect to this definition, some have said that common sense implies something everyone knows; if that is the case, then what appears to be common sense is often common nonsense, given the level of disagreements showing up on current social media.

In Latin, sensus communis means “common feelings of humanity.”

Sometimes the phrase is found hyphenated: “common-sense” — something which reflects common sense, as in “a common-sense approach.”

Discussion

We wondered if it is possible to teach common sense, or if it is an innate (although not always evident) characteristic of humanity.

If anyone can have an instance or episode of common sense, perhaps we should also examine how this ability can be compromised.

In the past, some religious scholars have posited the negative influence of Satan as the mechanism of compromise. Others have attributed common sense, or lack of it, to one’s maturity level.

One place where common sense fails is in superstition. We have discussed superstition previously; it might be helpful to review it here.

We see many scholarly articles whose premise is that psychology and psychiatry are “scientific” and thus not matters of common sense. We tried reading a paper about psychiatry and common sense; frankly, making any sense of it without falling asleep was a challenge. It propagates the idea that “common sense rests on judgments of the probable rather than what we can directly ascertain as true” — which we think, from the definitions above, is directly contrary to the idea that common sense depends on the perception and observation of reality. Perhaps, though, that is precisely where common sense leaves off and superstition begins.

The True Basis For Common Sense

So we come to what we think is the true basis for common sense, which is “obnosis” — the observation of the obvious, on which all good judgment is based.

Observation is not passive, it is very much an active process, involving the closest possible study of what one is observing. Thus we see that the most important thing which hinders or gets in the way of one’s common sense is anything which blocks or hinders close observation. Truth or falsity, while relevant, is not even close in importance to the actual observation of what is there in front of you.

And yes, you can indeed teach someone to observe. You can also rehabilitate this ability in someone whose common sense has been compromised by a too heavy dependence on belief as a replacement for certainty.

One other thing that aids in the exercise of common sense would be the ability to imagine the consequences of one’s actions. This provides a predictive quality so important to good judgment.

How Does Psychiatry Compromise Common Sense?

Having an unobstructed view of the world, as we have just observed, is of paramount importance. This viewpoint, as far as the physical perceptions provided by one’s body goes, depends upon the proper functioning of one’s nerves and the nervous system. Yet the primary “treatments” of psychiatry are drug-based, with neuroleptic (“nerve-seizing”) drugs a chief offender. And lately there is a heavy psychiatric emphasis on psychedelic drugs, known primarily for their interference with such perceptions.

Need we even mention the harm that psychiatric Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) does — a direct attack on the brain, the center of the body’s nerve system.

Can you imagine how these might compromise one’s common sense? There are harmful consequences for psychiatric treatment.

The Bottom Line

A Truly Common Sense Approach would be banning ECT, banning psychiatric drugs, in fact defunding and banning psychiatry.

Contact your local, state, and federal officials and representatives and let them know what you think about this.

In Memory of Common Sense & Courtesy
In Memory of Common Sense & Courtesy

A Truly Great Library Contains Something To Offend Everyone

Monday, May 3rd, 2021

“He who takes offense when offense was not intended is a fool, yet he who takes offense when offense is intended is an even greater fool for he has succumbed to the will of his adversary.” –Brigham Young

Offense and Offend, two related words of wide contemporary usage. Here are a few different meanings (we take wide liberties with grammar):

– something that outrages
– the act of displeasing or affronting
– the state of being insulted or morally outraged
– to transgress
– to violate a law or rule
– to cause difficulty, discomfort, or injury
– to cause dislike, anger, or vexation

[Ultimately from Latin offendere “to strike against, displease” from of- “on account of” + -fendere “to hit”.]

We mention these words because we notice a large amount of social commentary and speculation about those taking or giving offense.

In particular, we notice an apparent spike in instances where someone has taken offense at another, or at another’s opinion, or at least remarking on such; whether such offense was intended or not.

We’ve noticed this tendency more and more frequently over the last few years, and wondered what possible relation this could have with psychiatric and psychological infiltration into society.

We’re not the only ones who have noticed this phenomenon. Psychology Today published various articles about it, although we don’t think they accurately attributed its cause.

Sensitivity Training Destroys Personal Responsibility

Psychiatry’s deliberate infiltration of religion and pastoral counseling provides some clues. Psychiatrists first sought to replace religion with their “soulless science” in the late 1800’s. In 1940, psychiatry openly declared its anti-religion plans when British psychiatrist John Rawling Rees, a co–founder of the World Federation for Mental Health (WFMH), spoke of psychiatry infiltrating the Church.

Another co–founder of the WFMH, Canadian psychiatrist G. Brock Chisholm, reinforced this master plan in 1945 when he spoke about freeing the race from crippling religious values.

As a result of psychiatry’s subversive plan for religion, the concepts of good and bad behavior, right and wrong conduct and personal responsibility have taken such a beating that people today have few or no guidelines for checking, judging or directing their behavior. The consequences have been devastating for both society and religion.

Sensitivity Training developed by psychologists in the 1950’s spread rapidly to religious leaders and churches, invalidating personal responsibility in favor of lowered moral standards, leaving a confused populace open to being morally outraged, i.e. offended, by nearly anything.

Since 1967, morals have been usurped through the education system with the implementation of “Values Clarification.” Part of the Outcome-Based Education (OBE) package of techniques, “Values Clarification” emerged from Germany and was introduced into the U.S. classroom under various names, including Sensitivity Training, Self-Esteem training, Anger Management and Conflict Resolution, to name a few. None are any more than mental techniques designed to modify behavior – or more bluntly, alter beliefs and lower personal responsibility.

Psychiatric Folly

If a person acts in ways that annoy, upset or offend psychiatrists, they may be diagnosed as mentally ill and treated against their will.

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) has an entry called “Intermittent explosive disorder”, which means repeated, sudden episodes of impulsive, aggressive, violent behavior or angry verbal outbursts which are out of proportion to the situation.

In other words, psychiatrists can call you mentally ill and prescribe harmful and addictive psychotropic drugs if you give or take offense. This should act as a warning not to call your psychiatrist names.

Then again, some of these drugs have side effects which look to an outsider as if the person does have such a disorder. Aggressive or hostile behavior is a side effect of psychostimulants, newer antidepressants, antipsychotics, and anti-anxiety drugs. Of course, if you experience such side effects, you can also be diagnosed with the mental disorder “Other adverse effect of medication”, so psychiatrists can label you mentally ill whether you are taking their drugs or not.

If you know of any psychiatrist or psychologist who has committed a legal offense, a sexual offense, financial irregularity, malpractice, fraud or any other crime, report this to the police and to CCHR.

You’re Not Paranoid, It’s Really Happening

Monday, April 26th, 2021

Paranoia is an unfounded or exaggerated distrust of others, sometimes reaching delusional proportions. The word comes from the Greek word paranous “distracted”, ultimately from para- “irregular” + nous “mind”.

It’s a popular psychiatric designation, occurring in the fraudulent Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) as “Paranoid personality disorder”. As “paranoid schizophrenic” it can also come under one of the several DSM headings related to schizophrenia, meaning “delusions of persecution”.

It’s also the subject of various jokes such as:

“The mental-disease-of-the-month club is being disbanded because during paranoia month all the members moved and left no forwarding address.”
“What does a paranoid have in common with the all-knowing master of time space and dimension that secretly controls all of our lives? … Right, like you don’t know.”

What is it really?

Paranoia is a dramatization, which is an irrational set of thoughts and actions coming about from the restimulation of past moments of pain and unconsciousness, often containing a phrase such as “You’re all against me.” Some drugs in particular can restimulate this type of behavior.

Various Other Restimulants of Paranoia

Newer antidepressants such as Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) may have a side effect of paranoia. Smoking crack cocaine, marijuana, or taking LSD, methamphetamines or ecstasy (MDMA) can also cause paranoid behavior. The ADHD drugs Adderall, Concerta, Strattera, and Ritalin all have a potential side effect of paranoia. The psychedelic dimethyltryptamine (DMT) has a side effect of paranoia.

Being bullied may lead to a feeling that people plan to harm you, which can be misconstrued by a psychiatrist as a “mental illness” and considered a psychotic symptom for which psychotropic drugs can be prescribed, some of which then also have more paranoia as a side effect.

Addressing a person’s difficulties with getting a good night’s sleep, or with getting proper nutrition, may lead to improvements in psychotic symptoms such as paranoia.

Hypothyroidism, an insufficient production of thyroid hormone, can lead to paranoia.

A deficiency of vitamin B12 or folic acid (vitamin B9) can produce paranoia.

An allergic response to wheat, corn, cow’s milk, or tobacco can produce paranoia.

Undiagnosed and unhandled infections such as pneumonia, urinary tract infection, sepsis, malaria, Legionnaire’s disease, syphilis, typhoid, diphtheria, HIV, rheumatic fever and herpes can all cause such devastating mental symptoms.

Recommendations

One can plainly see that the symptom of paranoia has many possible triggers which are unrelated to any so-called psychiatric “mental disorder”.

Any medical doctor who takes the time to conduct a thorough physical examination of a person exhibiting signs of what a psychiatrist calls paranoia can find undiagnosed, untreated physical conditions. Any person labeled as paranoid needs to receive a thorough physical examination by a competent medical—not psychiatric—doctor to first determine what underlying physical condition is causing the manifestation.

The use of various psychiatric drugs, since they can themselves trigger a paranoid response, should be specifically avoided.

Any person falsely diagnosed as paranoid which results in treatment that harms them should file a complaint with the police and professional licensing bodies and have this investigated. They should seek legal advice about filing a civil suit against any offending psychiatrist and his or her hospital, associations and teaching institutions seeking compensation.

Give Me Your Attention Please

Monday, April 12th, 2021

As an English word, “attention” can mean one of many definitions:

  • applying the mind to something
  • selective focusing one’s perception or awareness
  • consideration with a view to action
  • an act of civility or courtesy
  • sympathetic consideration of someone’s needs and wants
  • a position assumed by a soldier
  • considering or taking notice
  • dealing with or taking special care
  • focusing interest

[From Latin attendere, from ad- ‘to’ + tendere ‘stretch’.]

Attention is a built-in attribute of living beings. For people (and some animals), it’s generally the ability to self-determinedly focus awareness (to greater or lesser degree); for plants, one might observe a more physical characteristic such as motion toward a light source.

There are two extremes of attention. Introversion is looking inward. Extroversion is looking outward. Attention can be aberrated such that it becomes too fixed and unable to sweep, or too dispersed and unable to focus. Somewhere in between these extremes is an optimum level for a given situation.

A simple remedy for excessive introversion is extroversion — a good look at and communication with the wider external environment; Take A Walk and Look At Things! A simple remedy for excessive extroversion, which is sometimes called “being buttered all over the universe”, could be “mindfulness” — which is just being in Present Time.

Attention is actually a flow of energy; it can flow outward, inward, or appear relatively motionless. As long as you can keep someone’s attention fixated or confused they can be controlled; this is how hypnotism works.

In the current environment of society, especially in psychiatric mental health “care”, it is all too common for attention to be manipulated by drugs, shock or impact. Picture being slapped in the face: got your attention, did it? Unfortunately such an impact can have two entirely opposite outcomes. On the one hand it might cause one to focus fixedly on the source of the impact. On the other hand it might cause one to lose consciousness and be unable to focus attention at all. Which way it goes depends on the suddenness and strength of the force. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), or shock treatment, is an extreme but prevalent example of psychiatric brutality.

Another often unsuspected cause of attention issues is illiteracy or study problems. The many side effects of reading and comprehension difficulties are a main barrier to one’s ability to focus attention. For example, the July 2002 George W. Bush President’s Commission on Excellence in Special Education revealed the source of a deeply troubled Special Education system: 40 percent of kids are being labeled with “learning disorders” simply because they have not been taught to read.

The Attention-Deficit Fraud

In 1987, “Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder” (ADHD) was literally voted into existence by a show of hands of American Psychiatric Association members and included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). Within a year, 500,000 children in America alone were diagnosed with this fake disease.

ADHD actually represents the spontaneous behaviors of normal children. When these behaviors become age-inappropriate, excessive or disruptive, the potential causes are limitless, including: boredom, poor teaching, inconsistent discipline at home, reading difficulty, tiredness, street drugs, nutritional deficiency, toxic overload, and many kinds of underlying physical illness.

The main “treatments” for so-called ADHD are psychotropic drugs which have known side effects of violence and suicide. Some of these drugs are no more than amphetamine-like stimulants, designed to shock one into focusing attention. Aside from the physical impact, there are also severe emotional conditions caused by even short-term use of such drugs. Hallucinations and psychotic behavior are not uncommon.

Due to the hazards of these drugs, in order to receive federal funds under the IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities in Education Act), the “Prohibition on Mandatory Medication Amendment” (H.R.1350) was signed into law by President George W. Bush on December 3, 2004 and requires schools to implement policies that prohibit schoolchildren being forced onto psychiatric drugs as a requisite for their education. The law states, “The psychological/psychiatric system should not be able to abuse Special Education by diagnosing childhood and educational problems and failure as ‘mental disorders.'”

Recommendations

People do not have a deficiency of attention, nor do they have a deficiency of attention drugs. They may have barriers that prevent or inhibit effective use of attention, but these have non-psychiatric-drug solutions.

1. Support legislative measures that will protect children from psychiatric and psychological interference and which will remove their destructive influence from our schools.

2. Ultimately, psychiatry and psychology must be eliminated from all education systems and their coercive and unworkable methods should never be funded by the State.

3. No person should be given psychiatric or psychological treatment against their will.

4. Government funding should never be used for mental health screening or treatment programs and should be allocated, instead, to better educational facilities, teachers and tutoring to improve the literacy and educational standards of students.

Depersonalization – Another Fake psychiatric Disorder

Monday, March 29th, 2021

Are you feeling unreal? Are you a stranger to yourself? You may have “Depersonalization Disorder”!

ROFL, forgive me. Like we don’t already have a surfeit of fake diseases in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)! Oh, wait! It’s already in the DSM-5, as “Depersonalization/derealization disorder” (DDD).

There is increasing evidence that psychotropic drugs evoke an unbearable state of mind, such as feeling unreal, feeling detached, feeling like a stranger to oneself, not having sensations, or feeling like a walking cadaver — so much so that the person opts for suicide or violence as a means of relief.

Oh, wait again! This sounds just like some of the side effects, or adverse reactions, of various psychiatric drugs! Note that derealization means that the perception of the world and of external reality are altered. Sounds like a hallucination or delusion, which are known side effects of antidepressants.

For example, newer antidepressants have reported side effects of: abnormal thoughts; agitation; akathisia (severe restlessness); anxiety; confusion; delusions; emotional numbing; hallucinations; mood swings; panic attacks; paranoia; suicidal thoughts or behavior; violent behavior; withdrawal symptoms including deeper depression.

And since DDD is in the DSM, a psychiatrist can prescribe additional harmful and addictive psychiatric drugs for this diagnosis.

Psychiatrists do not know what causes these symptoms or how to cure it, and there are no clinical tests which can diagnose it. Diagnosis is based solely on opinion. Treatment is generally an antidepressant or anti-anxiety drug, often in combination with cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) which is basically telling the patient what is wrong with them (evaluating for them).

There are whole organizations devoted just to DDD, providing a base for requesting research funds, getting articles published, and of course “treating” victims with more psychiatric drugs — when the actual treatment should include getting off the psychiatric drugs which are causing these side effects in the first place.

What about the person who experiences symptoms of so-called DDD without being on any drugs? Well, yes, Life can certainly include trauma needing some kind of relief; but it shouldn’t include drugs which can continue to cause these same symptoms, making the person a patient for life.

So What Actually Is The Condition Known As Depersonalization or Derealization?

A person’s inability to feel the reality of things stems directly from the introduction of some arbitrary consideration — something which has no basis in natural law or fact. This is often called “superstition.” For example, some person is feeling under the weather, and someone tells them “it’s all due to the lack of Prozac in your diet.” The person’s acceptance of this “solution” to their problem causes some unreality, since it is arbitrary and false. The introduction of any arbitrary thing into a problem or a solution invites further arbitraries to help “explain” it away. Eventually, one’s life becomes one exception after another, all arbitraries trying to correct the original misconception and on down the line.

One resolution is to trace back these arbitraries throughout one’s life and get the original one corrected. Obviously, psychiatric drugs cannot do this, as they merely deaden the nervous system to suppress symptoms and can never actually correct any arbitrary.

Recognize that the real problem is that psychiatrists fraudulently diagnose life’s problems as an “illness”, and stigmatize unwanted behavior as “diseases.” Psychiatry’s stigmatizing labels, programs and treatments are harmful junk science; their diagnoses of “mental disorders” are a hoax – unscientific, fraudulent and harmful. All psychiatric treatments, not just psychiatric drugs, are dangerous.

Contact your public officials and tell them what you think about this.