Pain is inevitable. Suffering is optional. [Buddhist proverb]

The subject of pain is often in the news. This week (23 August 2019) we notice the St. Louis Business Journal carrying an article about the National Institutes of Health giving a $2.1 million grant to a St. Louis University pain researcher “to help open up a new avenue for pain medication research.”

We have a suspicion that the whole subject of pain is not understood very well by many people, so we thought we’d discuss it here.

What is Pain?

The first order of business should be a useful definition of pain. As is usual with many English words, there are multiple definitions of the word. Pain is a perception available to living beings.

English definitions: punishment; an unpleasant bodily sensation; physical discomfort; mental or emotional distress or suffering; something troublesome; a result of loss; a result of causing bad acts.
[Middle English, from Anglo-French peine, from Latin poena, from Greek poin? “payment, penalty”]

Technical definitions: Pain is the randomity (misalignment) produced by sudden or strong counter-efforts (i.e. efforts opposing optimum survival); the ultimate penalty of destructive activity; the warning of loss; the threat of non-survival; the punishment for errors in trying to survive.

Memories of pain can be just as damaging as the actual pain itself. Unconsciousness to greater or lesser degree is a symptom of pain. Unfortunately for humans, any sensation is better than no sensation; so in the absence of any sensation one desires pain.

Pain can be synthesized as an electronic flow. Psychiatrists use the pain of electroshock and other harmful psychiatric treatments as a coercive control mechanism — a means of getting someone to behave as they have decided one should behave. A person can be so overwhelmed by pain that they become addicted to it.

Painkillers

Doctors prescribe pain killers to relieve pain. However, it has never been known exactly how or why these “work.” Research into pain killers generally occurs by accidental discoveries, and the results often have undesirable side effects. The actions of pain killers include impeding the electrical conductivity of nerve channels, rendering a person unfeeling. Pain drugs block wanted sensations as well as unwanted ones.

Psychiatric Drugs

Psychiatric drugs are prescribed for various types of physical pain and mental trauma. Read the manufacturer’s fine print for any psychiatric drug and it will say in so many words that “we don’t really know how this drug works,” and they all have bad side effects; although one could say that there are no “side effects” since these are the actual effects of the drugs, albeit unwanted. It could be dangerous to immediately cease taking psychiatric drugs because of potential significant withdrawal side effects. No one should abruptly stop taking any psychiatric drug without the advice and assistance of a competent medical doctor.

Because of the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), psychiatrists have deceived millions into thinking that the best answer to life’s many pains lies with the “latest and greatest” psychiatric drug. The DSM has led to the unnecessary drugging of millions of Americans who could be diagnosed, treated, and cured by non-psychiatric health care providers without the use of toxic and potentially lethal drugs.

Since psychiatric drugs do not actually cure conditions, but merely suppress symptoms, the patient may be lulled into a temporary sense of wellness; whatever condition has caused the symptom is still present and often growing worse.

A person in chronic physical pain may be misdiagnosed with a so-called mental disorder, labeled neurotic, and given a psychiatric drug which only makes the condition worse.

Authors Richard Hughes and Robert Brewin, in their book, The Tranquilizing of America, warned that although psychotropic drugs may appear “to ‘take the edge off’ anxiety, pain, and stress, they also take the edge off life itself … these pills not only numb the pain but numb the whole mind.”

Did we mention that the three Sackler brothers of Purdue Pharma, major enablers of the opioid addiction crisis, were all psychiatrists? A June 26, 2017 article on Kaiser Health News by Vickie Connor presents the information that, “Adults with a mental illness receive more than 50 percent of the 115 million opioid prescriptions in the United States annually.” We don’t really know which came first — the mental trauma or the physical pain; but it doesn’t really matter which comes first. The bottom line is that neither opioids nor psychiatric drugs are workable treatments.

What About the Suffering?

So how does one in pain overcome the suffering, as the ancient Buddhist proverb goes? Basically, understanding relieves suffering. We want you to understand that psychiatry kills. Find Out! Fight Back!

Premedication Sedation for Surgical Procedures

Premedication is the administration of drugs before anesthesia and surgery, usually intended to reduce anxiety and increase amnesia.

They are sometimes used with anesthesia to calm a patient down just prior to surgery or during their recovery. Promoting amnesia is said to reduce the risk of awareness during surgery; however, some people would rather not have their awareness truncated in this fashion.

They may be automatically administered without a patient’s knowledge, so be sure to ask, and indicate you don’t need them if you don’t want them.

Examples of drugs used for this sedation may be:

  • benzodiazepines such as Ativan (lorazepam), Valium (diazepam), Versed (midazolam)
  • barbiturates such as Amytal
  • other anxiolytics (anti-anxiety drugs) such as alpha-2 adrenergic agonists (clonidine, dexmedetomidine)
  • ketamine
  • anticholinergics

Readers will know that benzodiazepines are highly addictive psychiatric drugs with severe withdrawal effects and possible adverse reactions such as suicide and violence.

Barbiturates are highly dangerous psychiatric drugs because of the small difference between a normal dose and an overdose.

Alpha-2 adrenergic agonists have been used for decades to treat so-called  ADHD, so you know these are bad news.

Ketamine is an anesthetic now being promoted as a “miracle” treatment for depression, instead of its off-label use as a “date-rape” drug.

Anticholinergics may raise your risk of dementia, according to new research. An anticholinergic agent is a substance that blocks the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in the nervous system. Examples of strong anticholinergic drugs are antipsychotics and antidepressants.

While medicine has advanced on a scientific path to major discoveries and cures, psychiatry and psychiatric drugs have never evolved scientifically, are no closer to understanding or curing mental problems, and are mis-used as “medicine” as a “standard of care” which only makes matters worse.

While medicine has nurtured an enviable record of achievements and general popular acceptance, the public still links psychiatry to snake pits, straitjackets, and “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.” Psychiatry continues to foster that valid impression with its development of such brutal treatments as ECT, psychosurgery, the chemical straitjacket caused by antipsychotic drugs, and its long record of treatment failures, including the use of psychiatric drugs as premedication by real doctors who have been subverted by psychiatric promises that cannot be realized.

Click here to download and read the full CCHR report “Psychiatric Hoax — The Subversion of Medicine — Report and recommendations on psychiatry’s destructive impact on health care.

Supporting and Treating Officers In Crisis Act of 2019

Introduced by Republican Missouri Senator Josh Hawley, the “Supporting and Treating Officers In Crisis Act of 2019” (S. 998) was signed into law by President Trump on July 25, 2019.

This bill reauthorizes and expands certain Department of Justice grant programs to provide mental health, stress reduction, psychological services, suicide prevention services, and training for identifying, reporting, and responding to officer mental health crises and suicide, for law enforcement officers and their families. The bill authorizes up to $7,500,000 in appropriations each year for fiscal years 2020 to 2024, a maximum total of $37.5 million.

This sounds eminently socially acceptable, and indeed the bill was widely supported by Congress and various national advocacy groups.

The Real Crisis in Mental Health

While society certainly owes significant consideration and support to law enforcement officers (LEOs) and their families, we can’t help noting that in today’s environment, “mental health and suicide prevention services” really means psychiatric drugs and other harmful psychiatric treatments.

The real crisis in mental health care today is not officer stress, but psychiatric fraud and abuse.

While the bill specifically calls for evidence-based programs, the evidence actually shows that psychiatrists don’t know what causes mental trauma, are unable to predict violence or suicide, and cannot cure any mental disorder they claim to treat.

Psychiatric Fraud

By their own admission psychiatrists cannot predict violence or suicide, and often release violent patients from facilities, claiming that they are not a threat. In 1979, an American Psychiatric Association’s task force admitted in its Brief Amicus Curiae to the U.S. Supreme Court that psychiatrists could not predict dangerousness. It informed the court that “‘dangerousness’ is neither a psychiatric nor a medical diagnosis, but involves issues of legal judgment and definition, as well as issues of social policy.” In addition to not being able to predict violent behavior, psychiatrists certainly have no cures for it, a fact that even they admit.

Psychiatric diagnoses are not based on science, but opinion. Psychiatrists do not have any scientific or medical test to diagnose a person’s mental condition and rely upon faulty observation and opinion of behavior. They admit to not knowing the cause of a single mental disorder or how to cure them. The error in their opinions is enormous — they condemn the innocent, release the dangerous, induce violence in others through drugs and commit people who are not in need of help or turn those away who may genuinely be in need of it.

Recommendations

Rather than training psychiatrists and psychologists about LEO mental health, the grants should be used to train LEOs, security personnel, teachers, coroners, and other professionals to recognize that irrational, violent and suicidal behavior could be caused by psychiatric drugs.

Click here to download and read the CCHR report “Psychiatric Drugs Create Violence & Suicide — School Shootings & Other Acts of Senseless Violence.”

Click here to download and readPsychiatrists Cannot Predict or Cure Violence.

Missouri Settlement Changes Psychiatric Drug Use in Foster Kids

A class action federal lawsuit [Case No. 2:17-cv-04102-NKL] against the Missouri Department of Social Services alleging the overdrugging of foster children with harmful and addictive psychotropic drugs was given preliminary approval for settlement by U.S. District Court Judge Nanette Laughrey (Western District of Missouri) on Monday, July 15, 2019.

The case was first filed in June 2017 by national non-profit organizations Children’s Rights and the National Center for Youth Law (NCYL), the Saint Louis University School of Law Legal Clinics, and pro-bono counsel Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP.

The lawsuit claimed that children in Missouri foster care are at increased risk of being improperly or unnecessarily administered psychotropic drugs, leaving the children vulnerable to various serious adverse effects, including hallucinations, self-harm and suicidal thoughts.

Roughly 13,000 children are in Missouri’s foster care system. More than 30% of them are prescribed these harmful drugs, and 20% are taking two or more drugs at the same time. Medicaid pays for a majority of the healthcare services that children in foster care receive, including psychotropic drugs.

Most psychotropic drugs have not been FDA approved to treat children, who are at great risk of serious harm from these drugs because the drugs play Russian Roulette with neurotransmitters in the brain.

The settlement calls for multiple reforms, although without any of the defendants admitting any liability concerning any of the claims or allegations in the complaint. Objections, support, or comments by Class members or their legal representatives (or other interested parties) can be provided by October 23, 2019 per the “Notice of Proposed Class Action Settlement in M.B., et al. v. Tidball, et al.

The Missouri Department of Social Services, on behalf of the Missouri Children’s Division of the Department of Social Services, has contracted with the University of Missouri-Columbia to constitute a Center for Excellence within its Department of Psychiatry to undertake various responsibilities regarding this settlement, for roughly $3.8 million through July 31, 2021, although this contract is not specifically part of the settlement. While we applaud the Missouri government for taking action to address the abuse of foster children in their care, we must note that having psychiatrists oversee psychiatric abuse is like putting the fox in charge of the henhouse.

Specific commitments of the settlement include (these provisions are only briefly summarized here; refer to the actual settlement for full details):
1. Children’s Division (CD) shall maintain a full-time employee responsible for overseeing the implementation of policies and procedures concerning the use of psychotropic drugs for children in CD foster care.
2. Provisions for CD Case Management Staff Training.
3. Provisions for Resource Provider Training.
4. Provisions for training in the child welfare community serving children in Missouri.
5. CD shall maintain sufficient Case Management Staff to perform functions of the agreement.
6. Every child shall have a mental health assessment prior to being prescribed a psychotropic drug.
7. Every child prescribed a psychotropic drug shall have medical examinations.
8. Every child prescribed a psychotropic drug for ongoing use shall have monitoring appointments.
9. Every child prescribed a psychotropic drug shall receive concurrent nonpharmacological treatment.
10. Defendants are committed to developing and operating one or more statewide systems for maintaining medical records and/or medical information of each child in the custody of CD.
11. Defendants are committed to developing and operating one or more systems whereby pertinent medical records and/or medical information of the child will be made available to appropriate members of the child’s treatment team.
12. CD will implement and maintain a system for conducting secondary reviews of prescriptions of psychotropic drugs prescribed to children in the legal custody of CD.
13. CD shall maintain a policy governing informed consent and informed assent for psychotropic drugs, including a process for parental disagreement. The difference between consent and assent is basically that consent comes from the case manager and assent comes from the child.
14. Provisions for emergency administration of psychotropic drugs.
15.Defendants will appoint and maintain a psychotropic drug Advisory Committee to provide professional and technical consultation and policy advice.
16. Provisions for excessive dosage guidelines.

There are other provisions for data validation, enforcement, reporting, and exit criteria from the agreement. Refer to the actual agreement for these details.

Go here for more information about psychiatric abuse in the foster care system.

More About Psychiatric Drugs Causing Violence and Suicide

Reference:

Antidepressant-induced akathisia-related homicides associated with diminishing mutations in metabolizing genes of the CYP450 family
by Yolande Lucire and Christopher Crotty
Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine, 1 August 2011
[doi: 10.2147/PGPM.S17445]

This research paper details patients who had been referred to Dr. Lucire’s practice for expert opinion or treatment. More than 120 subjects were diagnosed with akathisia [a neurotoxic psychosis often characterized by a feeling of inner restlessness and inability to stay still] or serotonin toxicity [extremely high levels of serotonin causing toxic and potentially fatal effects] after taking psychiatric drugs that had been prescribed for psychosocial distress. Akathisia has been known to be associated with suicide since the 1950s and with homicide since 1985.

They were tested for variant alleles in cytochrome P450 (CYP450) genes, which play a major role in the metabolism of all antidepressant and many other drugs, indicating ultrarapid metabolism due to allele duplications. This seems to be strongly associated with a large number of deaths from intoxication and suicide. High or fast-changing levels of psychotropic substances can cause unpredictable toxicity leading to violent behavioral effects, including akathisia. [An allele is one of two or more alternative forms of a gene that arise by mutation and are found at the same place on a chromosome.]

Psychiatric drugs are metabolized in the liver by cytochrome P450 enzymes in order to be eliminated from the body. Abnormal CYP450 metabolism, either ultrarapid and/or diminished, can lead to the drug or its metabolites reaching a toxic level in hours or days, correlating with the onset of intense dysphoria [unease or generalized dissatisfaction with life] and akathisia. A person genetically deficient in these enzymes, or who has an ultrarapid drug metabolism, or who is taking other (legal or illegal) drugs that diminish CYP450 enzyme activity, is at risk of a toxic accumulation of the drug leading to more severe side effects.

Eight of these cases had committed homicide and many more became extremely violent or suicidal while on antidepressants. Ten representative case histories involving serious violence are presented in great detail in the paper. None of the ten subjects described had any history of mental illness; none had been violent before. All recovered from akathisia after stopping the medication without assistance or supervision and, frequently, against medical advice.

Akathisia suicides and homicides, particularly when they involved children, gave rise to the first antidepressant suicide advisories by the FDA in 2004.

Personal, medical, and legal problems can arise from using psychiatric drugs and experiencing the resulting toxicity from these metabolic effects. The results presented in this paper demonstrate the grave extent to which the psychiatric industry has expanded its influence beyond its ability to cure.

As the authors state, “In all of the cases presented here, the subjects were prescribed antidepressants that failed to mitigate distress emerging from their predicaments, which encompassed psychosocial stressors such as bereavement, marital and relationship difficulties, and work-related stress. Every subject’s emotional reaction worsened while their prescribing physicians continued the “trial and error” approach, increasing from standard to higher dose and/or switching to other antidepressants, with disastrous consequences. In some cases the violence ensued from changes occasioned by withdrawal and polypharmacy. In all of these cases, the subjects were put into a state of drug-induced toxicity manifesting as akathisia, which resolved only upon discontinuation of the antidepressant drugs.”

“It is the authors’ contention that prescribing antidepressants without knowing about CYP450 genotypes is like giving blood transfusions without matching for ABO groups [the classification of human blood].”

In general, the psychiatric industry pushes psychotropic drugs without regard to these CYP450 cautions, but this is the direct result of the unscientific psychiatric diagnoses perpetrated by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) which fraudulently justifies prescribing these harmful drugs for profit in the first place.

Recommendations

1. Practice Full Informed Consent by asking your doctor for information about possible side effects and benefits, ways to treat side effects, and risks of other conditions, as well as information about alternative treatments.

2. If your doctor diagnoses a mental disorder and prescribes a psychiatric drug, ask to see the clinical lab tests proving the diagnosis. (There won’t be any.)

3. All treatment options should include checking for real underlying medical conditions that could cause a patient’s mental or emotional duress.

4. Write your state and federal legislators to establish rights for patients and their insurance companies to receive refunds for mental health treatment which did not achieve the promised result or improvement, or which resulted in proven harm to the individual, thereby ensuring that responsibility lies with the individual practitioner and psychiatric facility rather than the government or its agencies.

5. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), psychiatry’s billing manual for mental disorders, is the key to false escalating mental illness statistics and psychiatric drug prescriptions and usage worldwide. Untold harm and colossal waste of mental health funds occur because of it. It is imperative that the DSM diagnostic system be abandoned before real mental health reform can occur.

6. Patients, doctors and insurance companies should report all instances of adverse side effects from psychiatric drugs to the FDA.

7. The pernicious influence of psychiatry has wreaked havoc throughout society, especially in hospitals, educational systems and prisons. Citizens groups and responsible government officials should work together to expose and abolish psychiatry’s hidden manipulation of society for profit.

Psychiatric Inpatients Have Elevated Risks for Adverse Reactions

[Reference: “Multiple adverse outcomes following first discharge from inpatient psychiatric care: a national cohort study”, The Lancet Psychiatry, June 03, 2019]

People discharged from inpatient psychiatric care are at higher risk than the rest of the population for a range of serious fatal and non-fatal adverse outcomes.

These individuals are also more likely to perpetrate violent crimes, including homicide. Suicide risk is known to be especially raised soon after discharge.

Results were summarized from 62,922 Danish people who had been discharged from inpatient psychiatric services and 1,573,050 who had never been a psychiatric inpatient, examining these adverse outcomes over ten years post-discharge: mortality, suicide, accidental death, homicide victimization, homicide perpetration, non-fatal self-harm, violent criminality, and hospitalization following violence.

The risk of at least one of these adverse outcomes was highest in people using psychoactive drugs.

Although no detailed clinical information was available regarding what psychiatric treatments were given, it can be assumed that psychiatric (psychoactive) drugs were a major part of most treatments, since worldwide statistics show that a rapidly increasing percentage of every age group, from children to the elderly, rely heavily and routinely on psychiatric drugs in their daily lives. Worldwide sales of antidepressants, for example, were more than $14 billion in 2017, and expected to surpass $15 billion by 2023.

These statistics give one more result in a long line of significant research that concludes:

  • psychiatry cannot cure any so-called mental illness
  • psychiatric treatments cause violence and suicide
  • psychiatric treatments actually harm rather than help vulnerable people
  • psychiatry is junk science
  • psychiatric drugs can only chemically mask problems and symptoms; they cannot and never will be able to solve problems

People in desperate circumstances must be provided proper and effective medical care. Medical, not psychiatric, attention, good nutrition, a healthy, safe environment and activity that promotes confidence will do far more than the brutality of psychiatry’s treatments.

While life is full of problems, and sometimes those problems can be overwhelming, it is important for you to know that psychiatry, its diagnoses and its drugs are the wrong way to go.

The Psychiatric Opioid Connection

Current media abounds about the opioid addiction and overdose crisis, and often points to the Sackler brothers of Purdue Pharma as major enablers of this horrific epidemic.

Rarely, however, does the media point out that Arthur, Mortimer and Raymond Sackler, pushing OxyContin for profit, were each practicing psychiatrists.

Psychiatrists have a history of pushing addictive drugs as “treatments.” LSD, heroin, psilocybin, mescaline, peyote, cannabis, ecstacy, and other hallucinogens have all been pushed by various psychiatrists as treatments for mental symptoms. Today, drug regulatory agencies all over the world approve clinical trials for the use of hallucinogenic drugs to handle anything from anxiety to alcoholism, despite the drugs being known to cause psychosis.

Now that psychiatrists have been exposed as perpetrators of drug addiction, we find that the opioid crisis has been claimed by the psychiatric industry as a behavioral health problem, because psychiatry claims that addiction is now a mental illness. Unfortunately there is no science to support this.

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) and the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10) euphemistically call addiction a “use disorder.” To cement its control of addiction “treatments”, the DSM lists hundreds of “use disorders” for a wide range of substances (alcohol, amphetamines, caffeine, cannabis, cocaine, inhalants, opioids, hallucinogens, phencyclidines, sedatives, hypnotics, anxiolytics, stimulants, tobacco, and other, unknown, or unspecified substances or stimulants.) Not to mention other types of impulsive or compulsive behaviors such as anorexia, gambling, gaming, pyromania, kleptomania and promiscuity.

Then, to confuse the situation even more, psychiatrists recommend treating drug addictions with more addictive drugs; this is called “medication-assisted treatment,” an increasingly influential and controversial paradigm in the world of medicine that, among other things, considers addiction a chronic “brain disease” treated by more drugs, rather than a condition that can be treated by addressing the social and spiritual aspects underlying addiction.

The late Professor Thomas Szasz said, “If we recognize that ‘mental illness’ is a metaphor for disapproved thoughts, feelings, and behaviors, we are compelled to recognize as well that the primary function of Psychiatry is to control thought, mood, and behavior.” Coercive psychiatry is not about curing mental disorders; it’s about controlling behavior and “we know best what’s good for you.”

By the way, you can also become addicted to common psychiatric drugs such as antidepressants, psychostimulants, anti-anxiety drugs, and barbiturates. Addictive drugs should never be discontinued abruptly, since the withdrawal side effects can be severe. For more information about how to safely withdraw from these harmful and addictive drugs, download and read the booklet Coming Off Psych Drugs Harm Reduction Guide.

Psychiatrists Anxious to Treat All Child-bearing Women for Post-Partum Depression

The FDA approved the first drug treatment for post-partum depression (PPD) on March 19, 2019. Psychiatrists call this “peripartum depression”, which means depressive symptoms during pregnancy or after childbirth. While there is no  actual diagnostic test for this, the current revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V) labels this with various alternative wordings of “depressive disorder” or “bipolar disorder” or “anxiety disorder” or “stress disorder,” sometimes with the specifier “with peripartum onset“, depending on the circumstances.

The diagnosis is totally subjective, and is a justification for making money for prescribing an antidepressant. Psychiatrists do not typically perform any clinical tests to find out if there is a real medical reason for the symptoms, such as thyroid problems or vitamin deficiencies. Research suggests that rapid changes in hormones and thyroid levels during and after delivery have a strong effect on moods, yet this is mostly ignored by the psychiatric industry since it is easier and more profitable to prescribe a psychotropic drug.

The drug is Zulresso (generic brexanolone), an intravenous infusion administered continuously over 60 hours (2.5 days) and requiring constant monitoring. There is a risk of serious harm due to a sudden loss of consciousness during the treatment, the appearance of suicidal thoughts and behaviors, or hypoxia (loss of oxygen in the blood). The drug passes into breast milk, but there is no data on the safety of brexanolone while breastfeeding. The cost has currently been set at $34,000 per course of treatment.

Sage Therapeutics says that this neurosteroid, a derivative of allopregnanolone, affects GABAA (Type-A gamma-Aminobutyric acid) neurotransmitter receptors in the brain, although the actual mechanism of action of this drug with respect to PPD (or any other condition) is unknown.

Many people think that post-partum depression is a mental illness. However, this is very misleading for a mother who has experienced the trauma of just giving birth. To have them think the emotional roller coaster they may be experiencing is the result of a “chemical imbalance in the brain,” requiring mind-altering medication, is false and potentially very harmful.

This does not mean that serious emotional difficulties do not exist. But it does mean that psychiatrists and psychologists have used such difficulties to their advantage, promoting powerful drugs as a “solution” for vulnerable individuals. This has been for the sake of profit, often at the expense of people’s lives.

Quite apart from such drugs causing harm, they are also unnecessary. Any competent medical doctor who takes the time to conduct a thorough physical examination of someone exhibiting signs of what psychiatrists say are “mental disorders,” including post-partum depression, can find undiagnosed, untreated physical conditions.

Instead, psychiatrists prefer to tell young mothers that their condition is an “illness,” requiring “medication,” potentially endangering the life of the mother and her child.

Women may experience drastic drops in hormone levels after the birth of a child that can deliver a major shock to the woman’s body. Nutritional and mineral depletion or deficiencies as well as a lack of sleep while caring for a baby can also cause the symptoms psychiatrists say are a “mental disorder.” It can be treated nutritionally.

For more information, download and read the CCHR bookletThe Drugging of ‘Post Partum Depression’ – Clearing up Misconceptions About ‘Chemical Imbalances,’ Antidepressant Drugs and Non-Drug Solutions“.

Mental Health in St. Louis

A new report (“St. Louis Regional Mental Health Data Report“, May, 2019) outlines mental health trends in the St. Louis, Missouri region.

The St. Louis County Department of Public Health and the City of St. Louis Department of Health prepared the report for System of Care St. Louis Region.

One significant finding is that “…intentional self-harm (i.e., suicide) was the sixth leading cause of death for children under 18 years of age and the third leading cause of death for ages 18 to 24 years in St. Louis County, and it is the tenth leading cause of death for all age groups in both the United States and the state of Missouri.”

Unfortunately, the report fails to notice that there is overwhelming evidence that psychiatric drugs cause suicide and violence.

While there is never one simple explanation for what drives a human being to commit such unspeakable acts of violence, all too often one common denominator has surfaced in hundreds of cases—-prescribed psychiatric drugs which are documented to cause mania, psychosis, violence, suicide and in some cases, homicidal ideation. To date, there has been no federal investigation of the link between psychiatric drugs and acts of suicide and violence.

Mental disorder is not a predictor of aggressive behavior, but rather the adverse effects of the drugs prescribed to treat it. Drug proponents argue that there are many shootings and acts of violence that have not been correlated to psychiatric (psychotropic) drugs, but that is exactly the point. It has neither been confirmed nor refuted, as law enforcement is not required to investigate or report on prescribed drugs linked to suicide and violence, and media rarely pose the question.

Those with a vested, financial interest will continue to champion the use of such drugs, as the psychiatric-pharmaceutical drug industry rakes in an average of $35 billion a year in sales in the U.S. alone. It is that vested financial interest which may be preventing a thorough investigation of the link between prescription psychoactive drugs and increased suicide and violence, especially considering that there have been calls for such investigations since the Columbine High School massacre in 1999.

The theory that a person is violent because he “stopped taking his medication” is misleading and omits the fact that it is more likely to be the withdrawal from a drug of dependence that is experienced—-not the return of the person’s “untreated mental illness.” Numerous studies and expert opinions support this. Psychotropic drug withdrawal destroys mental faculties and creates impulsivity.

It is long past time that government agencies answered that call with an investigation. Legislative hearings should be held to fully investigate the correlation between psychiatric treatment and violence and suicide. None can argue against the fact that disclosure of the facts would serve the public interest.

Click here for more information about the link between suicide, violence, and psychiatric drugs.

You’re Not Paranoid, It’s Really Happening

Abilify Mycite® (aripiprazole tablets with sensor, from Otsuka Pharmaceutical) is a prescription drug of an aripiprazole tablet (an atypical antipsychotic) with a metallic Ingestible Event Marker (IEM) sensor inside it, used in adults for diagnoses of schizophrenia, bipolar I disorder, and major depressive disorder. A month’s supply of it costs around $1,650. The actual mechanism of action of aripiprazole is unknown, although it messes with the levels of dopamine and serotonin in the brain, which is playing Russian Roulette with your mind.

The sensor is intended to track, with a smartphone app, if the drug has been taken. The ability of this drug to improve patient compliance or modify dosage has not been established. The only thing the FDA approved was functions related to tracking drug ingestion. The use of this drug to track drug ingestion in real-time or during an emergency is not recommended because detection may be delayed or not occur.

The drug sends information to a patch worn on the patient’s arm, which is then logged on a mobile app, which then sends the data to their doctor. Some experts warn that the idea of swallowing a tracking chip may be too much for paranoid patients to handle.

Said one expert, “I am concerned about the formation of new pharmaceutical persons who are digitally enhanced to be compliant with the profit motives of corporations and the directives of health providers and drug companies. … The fact that the drug is Abilify, which is prescribed to people who experience serious mental distress, should raise many ethical red flags. These concerns are especially relevant because the patent for the original Abilify drug expired in 2016… My concern is that … the company will be motivated to profit from the technology as much as possible, regardless of whether the drug actually improves health.”

The idea for this gross invasion of privacy comes about because refusing to take prescribed drugs is a particular psychiatric concern, and is even enshrined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V) as “Nonadherence to medical treatment.”

Abilify MyCite is still not widely used in the US, possibly because of skepticism from patients, prescribing doctors and insurance providers, although Otsuka has collaborated with Magellan Health to roll the drug out to the US, and UnitedHealthcare has developed complex rules for insurance authorization.

This drug has potentially severe side effects including stroke; akathisia; neuroleptic malignant syndrome; tardive dyskinesia; unusual urges such as compulsive gambling, sex, eating, or shopping; seizures; suicidal thoughts or behaviors. Side effects may be considerably more severe with known CYP2D6 poor metabolizers (a Cytochrome P450 enzyme.)

This drug also has a Boxed Warning about an increased risk of suicidal thinking and behavior in children, adolescents and young adults.

Recognize that the real problem is that psychiatrists fraudulently diagnose life’s problems as an “illness”, and stigmatize unwanted behavior as “diseases.” Psychiatry’s stigmatizing labels, programs and treatments are harmful junk science; their diagnoses of “mental disorders” are a hoax — unscientific, fraudulent and harmful.

If you are taking this drug, do not stop suddenly. You could suffer serious withdrawal symptoms. You should seek the advice and help of a competent medical doctor or practitioner before trying to come off any psychiatric drug.