Psychiatric Inpatients Have Elevated Risks for Adverse Reactions

[Reference: “Multiple adverse outcomes following first discharge from inpatient psychiatric care: a national cohort study”, The Lancet Psychiatry, June 03, 2019]

People discharged from inpatient psychiatric care are at higher risk than the rest of the population for a range of serious fatal and non-fatal adverse outcomes.

These individuals are also more likely to perpetrate violent crimes, including homicide. Suicide risk is known to be especially raised soon after discharge.

Results were summarized from 62,922 Danish people who had been discharged from inpatient psychiatric services and 1,573,050 who had never been a psychiatric inpatient, examining these adverse outcomes over ten years post-discharge: mortality, suicide, accidental death, homicide victimization, homicide perpetration, non-fatal self-harm, violent criminality, and hospitalization following violence.

The risk of at least one of these adverse outcomes was highest in people using psychoactive drugs.

Although no detailed clinical information was available regarding what psychiatric treatments were given, it can be assumed that psychiatric (psychoactive) drugs were a major part of most treatments, since worldwide statistics show that a rapidly increasing percentage of every age group, from children to the elderly, rely heavily and routinely on psychiatric drugs in their daily lives. Worldwide sales of antidepressants, for example, were more than $14 billion in 2017, and expected to surpass $15 billion by 2023.

These statistics give one more result in a long line of significant research that concludes:

  • psychiatry cannot cure any so-called mental illness
  • psychiatric treatments cause violence and suicide
  • psychiatric treatments actually harm rather than help vulnerable people
  • psychiatry is junk science
  • psychiatric drugs can only chemically mask problems and symptoms; they cannot and never will be able to solve problems

People in desperate circumstances must be provided proper and effective medical care. Medical, not psychiatric, attention, good nutrition, a healthy, safe environment and activity that promotes confidence will do far more than the brutality of psychiatry’s treatments.

While life is full of problems, and sometimes those problems can be overwhelming, it is important for you to know that psychiatry, its diagnoses and its drugs are the wrong way to go.

The Psychiatric Opioid Connection

Current media abounds about the opioid addiction and overdose crisis, and often points to the Sackler brothers of Purdue Pharma as major enablers of this horrific epidemic.

Rarely, however, does the media point out that Arthur, Mortimer and Raymond Sackler, pushing OxyContin for profit, were each practicing psychiatrists.

Psychiatrists have a history of pushing addictive drugs as “treatments.” LSD, heroin, psilocybin, mescaline, peyote, cannabis, ecstacy, and other hallucinogens have all been pushed by various psychiatrists as treatments for mental symptoms. Today, drug regulatory agencies all over the world approve clinical trials for the use of hallucinogenic drugs to handle anything from anxiety to alcoholism, despite the drugs being known to cause psychosis.

Now that psychiatrists have been exposed as perpetrators of drug addiction, we find that the opioid crisis has been claimed by the psychiatric industry as a behavioral health problem, because psychiatry claims that addiction is now a mental illness. Unfortunately there is no science to support this.

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) and the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10) euphemistically call addiction a “use disorder.” To cement its control of addiction “treatments”, the DSM lists hundreds of “use disorders” for a wide range of substances (alcohol, amphetamines, caffeine, cannabis, cocaine, inhalants, opioids, hallucinogens, phencyclidines, sedatives, hypnotics, anxiolytics, stimulants, tobacco, and other, unknown, or unspecified substances or stimulants.) Not to mention other types of impulsive or compulsive behaviors such as anorexia, gambling, gaming, pyromania, kleptomania and promiscuity.

Then, to confuse the situation even more, psychiatrists recommend treating drug addictions with more addictive drugs; this is called “medication-assisted treatment,” an increasingly influential and controversial paradigm in the world of medicine that, among other things, considers addiction a chronic “brain disease” treated by more drugs, rather than a condition that can be treated by addressing the social and spiritual aspects underlying addiction.

The late Professor Thomas Szasz said, “If we recognize that ‘mental illness’ is a metaphor for disapproved thoughts, feelings, and behaviors, we are compelled to recognize as well that the primary function of Psychiatry is to control thought, mood, and behavior.” Coercive psychiatry is not about curing mental disorders; it’s about controlling behavior and “we know best what’s good for you.”

By the way, you can also become addicted to common psychiatric drugs such as antidepressants, psychostimulants, anti-anxiety drugs, and barbiturates. Addictive drugs should never be discontinued abruptly, since the withdrawal side effects can be severe. For more information about how to safely withdraw from these harmful and addictive drugs, download and read the booklet Coming Off Psych Drugs Harm Reduction Guide.

Psychiatrists Anxious to Treat All Child-bearing Women for Post-Partum Depression

The FDA approved the first drug treatment for post-partum depression (PPD) on March 19, 2019. Psychiatrists call this “peripartum depression”, which means depressive symptoms during pregnancy or after childbirth. While there is no  actual diagnostic test for this, the current revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V) labels this with various alternative wordings of “depressive disorder” or “bipolar disorder” or “anxiety disorder” or “stress disorder,” sometimes with the specifier “with peripartum onset“, depending on the circumstances.

The diagnosis is totally subjective, and is a justification for making money for prescribing an antidepressant. Psychiatrists do not typically perform any clinical tests to find out if there is a real medical reason for the symptoms, such as thyroid problems or vitamin deficiencies. Research suggests that rapid changes in hormones and thyroid levels during and after delivery have a strong effect on moods, yet this is mostly ignored by the psychiatric industry since it is easier and more profitable to prescribe a psychotropic drug.

The drug is Zulresso (generic brexanolone), an intravenous infusion administered continuously over 60 hours (2.5 days) and requiring constant monitoring. There is a risk of serious harm due to a sudden loss of consciousness during the treatment, the appearance of suicidal thoughts and behaviors, or hypoxia (loss of oxygen in the blood). The drug passes into breast milk, but there is no data on the safety of brexanolone while breastfeeding. The cost has currently been set at $34,000 per course of treatment.

Sage Therapeutics says that this neurosteroid, a derivative of allopregnanolone, affects GABAA (Type-A gamma-Aminobutyric acid) neurotransmitter receptors in the brain, although the actual mechanism of action of this drug with respect to PPD (or any other condition) is unknown.

Many people think that post-partum depression is a mental illness. However, this is very misleading for a mother who has experienced the trauma of just giving birth. To have them think the emotional roller coaster they may be experiencing is the result of a “chemical imbalance in the brain,” requiring mind-altering medication, is false and potentially very harmful.

This does not mean that serious emotional difficulties do not exist. But it does mean that psychiatrists and psychologists have used such difficulties to their advantage, promoting powerful drugs as a “solution” for vulnerable individuals. This has been for the sake of profit, often at the expense of people’s lives.

Quite apart from such drugs causing harm, they are also unnecessary. Any competent medical doctor who takes the time to conduct a thorough physical examination of someone exhibiting signs of what psychiatrists say are “mental disorders,” including post-partum depression, can find undiagnosed, untreated physical conditions.

Instead, psychiatrists prefer to tell young mothers that their condition is an “illness,” requiring “medication,” potentially endangering the life of the mother and her child.

Women may experience drastic drops in hormone levels after the birth of a child that can deliver a major shock to the woman’s body. Nutritional and mineral depletion or deficiencies as well as a lack of sleep while caring for a baby can also cause the symptoms psychiatrists say are a “mental disorder.” It can be treated nutritionally.

For more information, download and read the CCHR bookletThe Drugging of ‘Post Partum Depression’ – Clearing up Misconceptions About ‘Chemical Imbalances,’ Antidepressant Drugs and Non-Drug Solutions“.

Mental Health in St. Louis

A new report (“St. Louis Regional Mental Health Data Report“, May, 2019) outlines mental health trends in the St. Louis, Missouri region.

The St. Louis County Department of Public Health and the City of St. Louis Department of Health prepared the report for System of Care St. Louis Region.

One significant finding is that “…intentional self-harm (i.e., suicide) was the sixth leading cause of death for children under 18 years of age and the third leading cause of death for ages 18 to 24 years in St. Louis County, and it is the tenth leading cause of death for all age groups in both the United States and the state of Missouri.”

Unfortunately, the report fails to notice that there is overwhelming evidence that psychiatric drugs cause suicide and violence.

While there is never one simple explanation for what drives a human being to commit such unspeakable acts of violence, all too often one common denominator has surfaced in hundreds of cases—-prescribed psychiatric drugs which are documented to cause mania, psychosis, violence, suicide and in some cases, homicidal ideation. To date, there has been no federal investigation of the link between psychiatric drugs and acts of suicide and violence.

Mental disorder is not a predictor of aggressive behavior, but rather the adverse effects of the drugs prescribed to treat it. Drug proponents argue that there are many shootings and acts of violence that have not been correlated to psychiatric (psychotropic) drugs, but that is exactly the point. It has neither been confirmed nor refuted, as law enforcement is not required to investigate or report on prescribed drugs linked to suicide and violence, and media rarely pose the question.

Those with a vested, financial interest will continue to champion the use of such drugs, as the psychiatric-pharmaceutical drug industry rakes in an average of $35 billion a year in sales in the U.S. alone. It is that vested financial interest which may be preventing a thorough investigation of the link between prescription psychoactive drugs and increased suicide and violence, especially considering that there have been calls for such investigations since the Columbine High School massacre in 1999.

The theory that a person is violent because he “stopped taking his medication” is misleading and omits the fact that it is more likely to be the withdrawal from a drug of dependence that is experienced—-not the return of the person’s “untreated mental illness.” Numerous studies and expert opinions support this. Psychotropic drug withdrawal destroys mental faculties and creates impulsivity.

It is long past time that government agencies answered that call with an investigation. Legislative hearings should be held to fully investigate the correlation between psychiatric treatment and violence and suicide. None can argue against the fact that disclosure of the facts would serve the public interest.

Click here for more information about the link between suicide, violence, and psychiatric drugs.

You’re Not Paranoid, It’s Really Happening

Abilify Mycite® (aripiprazole tablets with sensor, from Otsuka Pharmaceutical) is a prescription drug of an aripiprazole tablet (an atypical antipsychotic) with a metallic Ingestible Event Marker (IEM) sensor inside it, used in adults for diagnoses of schizophrenia, bipolar I disorder, and major depressive disorder. A month’s supply of it costs around $1,650. The actual mechanism of action of aripiprazole is unknown, although it messes with the levels of dopamine and serotonin in the brain, which is playing Russian Roulette with your mind.

The sensor is intended to track, with a smartphone app, if the drug has been taken. The ability of this drug to improve patient compliance or modify dosage has not been established. The only thing the FDA approved was functions related to tracking drug ingestion. The use of this drug to track drug ingestion in real-time or during an emergency is not recommended because detection may be delayed or not occur.

The drug sends information to a patch worn on the patient’s arm, which is then logged on a mobile app, which then sends the data to their doctor. Some experts warn that the idea of swallowing a tracking chip may be too much for paranoid patients to handle.

Said one expert, “I am concerned about the formation of new pharmaceutical persons who are digitally enhanced to be compliant with the profit motives of corporations and the directives of health providers and drug companies. … The fact that the drug is Abilify, which is prescribed to people who experience serious mental distress, should raise many ethical red flags. These concerns are especially relevant because the patent for the original Abilify drug expired in 2016… My concern is that … the company will be motivated to profit from the technology as much as possible, regardless of whether the drug actually improves health.”

The idea for this gross invasion of privacy comes about because refusing to take prescribed drugs is a particular psychiatric concern, and is even enshrined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V) as “Nonadherence to medical treatment.”

Abilify MyCite is still not widely used in the US, possibly because of skepticism from patients, prescribing doctors and insurance providers, although Otsuka has collaborated with Magellan Health to roll the drug out to the US, and UnitedHealthcare has developed complex rules for insurance authorization.

This drug has potentially severe side effects including stroke; akathisia; neuroleptic malignant syndrome; tardive dyskinesia; unusual urges such as compulsive gambling, sex, eating, or shopping; seizures; suicidal thoughts or behaviors. Side effects may be considerably more severe with known CYP2D6 poor metabolizers (a Cytochrome P450 enzyme.)

This drug also has a Boxed Warning about an increased risk of suicidal thinking and behavior in children, adolescents and young adults.

Recognize that the real problem is that psychiatrists fraudulently diagnose life’s problems as an “illness”, and stigmatize unwanted behavior as “diseases.” Psychiatry’s stigmatizing labels, programs and treatments are harmful junk science; their diagnoses of “mental disorders” are a hoax — unscientific, fraudulent and harmful.

If you are taking this drug, do not stop suddenly. You could suffer serious withdrawal symptoms. You should seek the advice and help of a competent medical doctor or practitioner before trying to come off any psychiatric drug.

Chanting the Chantix Mantra

Recently there has been a gross increase in the TV ad campaign for Chantix, promoting this deadly drug for smoking cessation.

We’ve written about Chantix before, but we thought a repeat was in order due to this massive ad campaign.

In 2008 the Federal Aviation Administration banned Chantix for pilots and air traffic controllers, and reissued that decision in 2013.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) slapped a “Black Box” warning on Chantix (varenicline tartrate, made by Pfizer) in 2009 after receiving thousands of reports linking the drug to mental health issues, including suicidal thoughts, hostility and agitation.

In 2015, the FDA expanded the warning to note that the drug had also been linked to reduced alcohol tolerance leading to seizures.

However, in 2016 the FDA removed the Black Box warning, after heavy lobbying from Pfizer claiming that additional data showed that the benefits of Chantix outweighed its adverse side effects (oh, and since its sales had significantly dropped.)

But the adverse side effects did not go away; only the Black Box warning went away. One study found that Chantix had more cases of suicidal thoughts, self-harm, and homicidal thoughts than any other drug, by a more than three-fold margin. Pfizer’s prescribing information still warns about new or worsening mental health problems such as changes in behavior or thinking, aggression, hostility, agitation, depressed mood, or suicidal thoughts or actions while taking or after stopping Chantix.

We suspect that the recent spate of TV ads is related to the removal of the Black Box warning and the prior drop in sales. Also, the price of Chantix more than doubled between 2013 and 2018. In 2013, Pfizer paid out $273 million to settle a majority of the 2,700 state and federal lawsuits that had been filed over adverse side effects. Now the company is trying to grow the market with clinical studies for smokers age 12 to 19.

What is Chantix?

Chantix is a psychiatric drug — a benzodiazepine-based anti-anxiety drug, also called a minor tranquilizer or sedative hypnotic. Daily use of therapeutic doses of benzodiazepines are associated with physical dependence, and addiction can occur after 14 days of regular use. Typical consequences of withdrawal are anxiety, depression, sweating, cramps, nausea, psychotic reactions and seizures. There is also a “rebound effect” where the individual experiences even worse symptoms than they started with as a result of chemical dependency.

The exact mechanism of action of benzodiazepines is not known, but they affect neurotransmitters in the brain and suppress the activity of nerves, under the unproven theory that excessive activity of nerves may be the cause of anxiety. Chantix was developed to specifically affect nicotinic receptors in the brain, under the theory that this would reduce nicotine craving and block the rewarding effects of smoking. Messing with neurotransmitters in the brain is playing Russian Roulette with your mind.

Benzodiazepines are metabolized by cytochrome P450 enzymes, so a genetic lack of these enzymes can cause a buildup of harmful toxins and increase the severity of adverse side effects.

Psychiatric “best practices” consider that smoking is an addiction and recommend that psychiatrists assess tobacco use at every patient visit, since tobacco addiction is covered in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V) as a “mental illness” under eight separate items, and disorders related to inhalant use have 33 entries. Smoking is not a mental illness and addiction cannot be fixed with psychiatric drugs.

The psychiatric industry considers that smoking cessation therapies are their territory, however this drug masks the real cause of problems in life and debilitates the individual, thus denying one the opportunity for real recovery and hope for the future. Treating substance abuse with drugs is a major policy blunder; contact your state and federal representatives and let them know you disapprove of this trend.

Recognize that the real problem is that psychiatrists fraudulently diagnose life’s problems as an “illness”, and stigmatize unwanted behavior like smoking as a “disease.” Psychiatry’s stigmatizing labels, programs and treatments are harmful junk science; their diagnoses of “mental disorders” are a hoax — unscientific, fraudulent and harmful. All psychiatric treatments, not just psychiatric drugs, are dangerous.

Committee on Quackery Hides Psychotropic Drug Proliferation

The 1963-1974 American Medical Association Committee on Quackery set out to discredit chiropractors, with the AMA urging its members to lend “their full support to the continuing vigorous attack on medical quackery and to the education program on the cult of chiropractic.”

The AMA recommended that Congress exclude payment for chiropractic services from federally supported health programs. On August 25, 1987, Federal Judge Susan Getzendanner, in U.S. District Court, found the AMA had engaged in an illegal boycott against chiropractors and an injunction against such activity was entered and affirmed by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit on February 7, 1990.

Chiropractors, of course, do not prescribe drugs.

It is not surprising that the AMA — also top heavy with psychiatrists as members — feared chiropractors. By the mid 1970s, 48% of American adults had taken a prescribed psychotropic drug. In 1977 alone, there were 85 million prescriptions for tranquilizers and 5 billion doses of pills, with an estimated 50 deaths related to Valium use alone. In 1970, 150,000 children were prescribed Ritalin, a figure that nearly doubled over the next two years to 250,000.

Cocaine-like stimulants such as Ritalin, now known to cause strokes, heart attacks, psychosis and death, were being handed out like candy for a completely fictitious “mental disorder.” Since then chiropractors and doctors practicing complementary medicine have continued to speak out against psychiatric drug practices.

In 2000, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) revealed the results of studies on both animals and humans who were given cocaine and Ritalin. The test subjects could not tell the difference. The DEA concluded that, “They produce effects that are nearly identical.”

Overdoses from methylphenidate, the primary ingredient in Ritalin, doubled between 2004 and 2005.

By 2006, nearly 7 million Americans abused prescription drugs, including Ritalin — more that the number who abused cocaine, heroin, hallucinogens, Ecstasy and inhalants, combined. In the US, the number of stimulant prescriptions soared from around 5 million in 1991 to nearly 35 million in 2007.

There are thousands of physicians, acupuncturists, holistic psychiatrists, nutritional psychologists, nutritionists, chiropractors, herbalists, and other healers who do not rely upon psychiatric drugs.  Instead we are bombarded with ads that continually shove their message that psychiatric drugs are the solution to all our problems.

In the US today, more than 8 million children have been put on mind-altering psychiatric drugs. Psychiatric drugs can only chemically mask problems and symptoms; they cannot and never will be able to solve problems. The true resolution of many mental difficulties begins, not with a checklist of symptoms, but with ensuring that a competent, non-psychiatric physician completes a thorough physical examination.

While life is full of problems, and sometimes those problems can be overwhelming, it is important for you to know that psychiatry, its diagnoses and its drugs are the wrong way to go.

For more information go to www.CCHRSTL.org.

The Psychiatric Scientific Double Standard

When it comes to psychiatric scientific research, there is a double standard that favors what makes money and disavows what does not make money. When we say “double standard” we mean some rule or principle which is unfairly applied in different ways to different groups or situations, or that favors one group or situation over another. The actual principle in question here is called “evidence-based science.”

Many scientists, particularly those in the psychiatric-pharmaceutical industry, mouth that they favor “evidence-based science” when in fact they favor what can make the most money regardless of the evidence.

A recent Scientific American editorial (“The WHO Takes a Reckless Step“, April, 2019) denigrates Traditional Chinese Medicine because it is purportedly not “evidence-based.”

Yet Scientific American promotes psychiatry and psychiatric drugs, when it knows that every psychiatric drug on the market has somewhere in its fine print a statement to the effect that “we don’t know how it works,” while the FDA approves these drugs based on so-called “evidence.”

Here are some representative quotes:

  • The fine print for Rexulti (brexpiprazole, an antipsychotic) says, “the exact way REXULTI works is unknown”.
  • The fine print for Latuda (lurasidone, an antipsychotic) says, “It’s not known exactly how LATUDA works, and the precise way antipsychotics work is also unknown”.
  • The fine print for Xanax (alprazolam, a benzodiazepine anti-anxiety drug) says, “Their exact mechanism of action is unknown”.

So much for evidence-based practice! The actual evidence is, they don’t have a clue how these drugs are supposed to work — it’s all conjecture!

As we continue to examine the actual evidence, we come up against the adverse reactions, or side effects, of these drugs. This is hard evidence, not conjecture.

What is a Side Effect?

Side effects (also called “adverse reactions”) are the body’s natural response to having a chemical disrupt its normal functioning.

One could also say that there are no drug side effects, these adverse reactions are actually the drug’s real effects; some of these effects just happen to be unwanted.

The FDA takes the adverse side effect of suicide seriously by placing a Black Box Warning on certain psychiatric drugs. For example, the FDA says that “Antidepressants increase the risk of suicidal thinking and behavior (suicidality) in children and adolescents with MDD [Major Depressive Disorder] and other psychiatric disorders.”

What about those who say psychotropic drugs really did make them feel better? Psychotropic drugs may relieve the pressure that an underlying physical problem could be causing but they do not treat, correct or cure any physical disease or condition. This relief may have the person thinking he is better but the relief is not evidence that a psychiatric disorder exists. Ask an illicit drug user whether he feels better when snorting cocaine or smoking dope and he’ll believe that he is, even while the drugs are actually damaging him. Some drugs that are prescribed to treat depression can have a “damping down” effect. They suppress the physical feelings associated with “depression” but they are not alleviating the condition or targeting what is causing it.

Once the drug has worn off, the original problem remains. As a solution or cure to life’s problems, psychotropic drugs do not work.

For the first time the side effects of psychiatric drugs that have been reported to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) by doctors, pharmacists, other health care providers and consumers have been decrypted from the FDA’s MedWatch reporting system and been made available to the public in an easy to search psychiatric drug side effects database and search engine. This database is provided as a free public service by the mental health watchdog, Citizens Commission on Human Rights International (CCHR).

Knock Yourself Out with Spravato (Esketamine)

A nasal spray version of the anesthetic drug ketamine was approved by the FDA on March 5, 2019 for treatment-resistant depression.

Janssen Pharmaceuticals says that the cost for a one-month course of treatment for Spravato (generic esketamine) will be between $4,720 and $6,785.

Esketamine is the S-enantiomer of ketamine, which means that it is one of the two mirror images of the chemical structure of ketamine, S (for the Latin sinister) being the left image. It enhances glutamine release in the brain. Glutamine is an amino acid used in the synthesis of proteins, among other things. In the brain, glutamine is used in the production of neurotransmitters. It is believed that glutamine plays a role in raising or lowering aggression levels.

Treatment requires that doses be taken, in conjunction with an oral antidepressant, in a doctor’s office or clinic, with patients monitored for at least two hours, and their experience entered in a registry.

Because of the risk of serious adverse outcomes and the potential for abuse and misuse of the drug, it is only available through a restricted distribution system. At least you can’t take it home with you.

The Spravato labeling contains a Boxed Warning that cautions that patients are at risk for sedation and difficulty with attention, judgment and thinking (dissociation), abuse and misuse, and suicidal thoughts and behaviors after administration of the drug.

Basically, it knocks you out so you don’t feel so depressed anymore. You don’t feel much of anything, actually, since you’ve just taken an anesthetic in the snout.

There were four phase 3 clinical trials; two of them failed to show any statistical improvement, but the drug was approved anyway because it was on the Fast Track and Breakthrough Therapy paths.

A 9/5/2018 update from Consumer Reports said, “All these drugs [Ketamine, Phenylbutazone, Chloramphenicol] are prohibited in beef, poultry, and pork consumed in the U.S. Yet government data obtained by Consumer Reports suggest that trace amounts of these and other banned or severely restricted drugs may appear in the U.S. meat supply more often than was previously known.”

Note that “depression” is not an actual medical illness; it is simply a symptom of some undiagnosed and untreated condition. A diagnosis of depression is a prime example of psychiatric fraud.

Any form of ketamine used to treat so-called depression is unethical and harmful, since it precludes the patient from finding out what is actually wrong and getting that treated. Psychiatrists pushing ketamine or esketamine are shameful drug pushers who are making a buck off people’s misfortune.

Go here for more information about alternatives to drugs.

Depression and The Marketing of Madness

The high-income partnership between psychiatry and drug companies has created an $80 billion psychotropic drug profit center, requiring constant marketing to push harmful and addictive psychotropic drugs on a vulnerable public.

How did psychotropic drugs, with no target illness, no known curative powers and a long and extensive list of harmful side effects, become the go-to treatment for every kind of psychological distress? And how did the psychiatrists espousing these drugs come to dominate the field of mental treatment?

Clever marketing hides the harm in a succession of consumer ads constantly churning through “new revelations.”

The most recent we’ve seen have been these gems:

— A new marketing catchphrase is being used in a Trintellix commercial — “Depression is multiple symptoms.”

— Another new marketing catchphrase is being used in a Latuda commercial — “A different type of depression.”

Psychiatry continues heavily pushing false data about depression

The fact is, the American Psychiatric Association, the American Medical Association and the National Institute of Mental Health admit that there are no medical tests to confirm depression as a disease but do nothing to counter the false idea that these are biological/medical conditions when in fact, diagnosis is simply done by a checklist of behaviors.

There are 77 entries in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) using some variation of the word “depressive”, so that nearly anyone can be so diagnosed and prescribed harmful and addictive psychotropic drugs.

Yes, people experience various symptoms of mental distress. This does not make them “mentally diseased” and there is no evidence of physical/medical abnormality for the so-called diagnosis of “depression.” This doesn’t mean that there aren’t solutions for people experiencing difficulty; there are non harmful, medical alternatives. But they do not require a psychiatric “label” to treat them. There is no mental illness test that is scientifically/medically proven. This isn’t a matter of opinion — psychiatrists who are opposed to the labeling of behaviors as mental illness openly admit this.

Dr. Thomas Szasz said, “The term ‘mental illness’ refers to the undesirable thoughts, feelings, and behaviors of persons.” More properly, it is just what psychiatry and psychiatrists have inappropriately labeled as “undesirable behavior;” the prime undesirable antisocial people on the planet telling you what they think is undesirable!

Find out more about the fake “disease” called depression and the harm that anti-depressive drugs do.

Watch the documentary exposing the truth behind the slick marketing schemes and scientific deceit that conceal a dangerous and often deadly sales campaign.

The Marketing of Madness Education Package is the ultimate resource for educating others on the dangerous effects of psychotropic drugs, and the multi-billion-dollar psychiatric-pharmaceutical partnership now dominating the field of mental health. CCHR is offering this kit for free to educators and lecturers to assist them in educating others about the risks of these mind-altering drugs, and to furnish information that is generally not told to patients or physicians. Arm yourself with the facts about psychiatry.