The Gray Shades Of Gaslighting

Gaslighting is a form of psychological manipulation or brainwashing intended to gain control of another person or group and make them question themselves, their memory, their perception, or their sanity.

The term originated from the 1938 play (and subsequent film adaptations) Gas Light, where the protagonist’s husband slowly manipulated her into believing she’s going mad by dimming the gaslights and telling her she was imagining it.

This is apparently a common Hollywood theme; I recall seeing the same premise in a 1960’s Perry Mason episode.

If it’s common in Hollywood, chances are it’s common in real life.

In the current political and social climate, fake news is the new standard for gaslighting. Frankly, this is nothing really new; the Russians have been at it since communism began around 1844, in one form or another.

The psychiatric Connection
The 1920’s Russian Revolutionary Communistic plan for world domination as originally conceived used psychiatry as a weapon designed to undermine the social fabric of the target country. The practice continues today using mind-altering psychiatric drugs to overwhelm a person and create terrorists who have been drug-deluded into committing heinous crimes against humanity.
Not only do psychiatrists commit gaslighting in the form of manipulating terrorists to do their dirty work, but also they cover their tracks by diagnosing and treating the results of such manipulation. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) labels as a mental disorder being a “Victim of terrorism or torture”; or more generally, being a victim of psychological abuse.

And on the other side a person can be diagnosed by a psychiatrist as a perpetrator of psychological abuse.

They’ve got you both coming and going; gaslighting and being gaslighted. And then they can prescribe an addictive, mind-altering psychiatric drug to keep you there, since they don’t keep collecting your insurance unless they can keep diagnosing you and “treating” you with psychiatric drugs.

Don’t think we’re making this up; it’s right there in the DSM.

Coercive psychiatrists are themselves often thought by their patients to be perpetrators of gaslighting. This can create a conflict where the patient is unable to trust their own sense of their feelings and surroundings in favor of evaluations by the therapist. Gaslighting has also been observed between patients and staff in inpatient psychiatric facilities.

All in all such manipulations are unhealthy. Since the psychiatric industry itself admits it has no capacity to cure, we observe psychology and psychiatry taking advantage of vulnerable patients for their own purposes instead of the therapeutic care and treatment of individuals who are suffering emotional disturbance.

Don’t be caught gaslighted — execute a Living WillLetter of Protection from Psychiatric Incarceration and/or Treatment.”

How psychiatry Blunts Innovation and Scientific Research

Reference:
United Nations Promoting Sustainable Development
Resolution adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on 25 September 2015 “Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

Sustainable: Of, relating to, or being a method or lifestyle for using resources so that the resources can be maintained and continued, and are not depleted or permanently damaged.

[from Old French sustenir (French: soutenir), from Latin sustineo, sustinere, from sub– (under) + teneo (hold, uphold, possess, guard, maintain)]

The U.N. Sustainable Development Goals

The 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) and their 169 associated targets adopted in 2015 and accepted by all Member States seek to realize the human rights of all and balance economic, social and environmental factors towards peace and prosperity for all.

To this end we examine some of the existing factors which block or inhibit the realization of these goals, and which must be eliminated so that the goals can be achieved in practice.

SDG 9: Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation.

Target 9.5: Enhance scientific research, upgrade the technological capabilities of  industrial sectors in all countries, in particular developing countries, including, by 2030, encouraging innovation and substantially increasing the number of research and development workers per 1 million people and public and private research and development spending.

How Psychiatry Obstructs Target 9.5

Basically we see two major ways that psychiatry obstructs scientific research.

1) Psychiatric research is not scientific.

In 40 years, “biological psychiatry” has yet to validate a single psychiatric diagnosis as a disease, or as anything neurological, biological, chemically imbalanced or genetic. While medicine has advanced on a scientific path to major discoveries and cures, psychiatry has never evolved scientifically and is no closer to understanding or curing mental problems.

While medicine has nurtured an enviable record of achievements and general popular acceptance, the public still links psychiatry to snake pits, straitjackets, and “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.” Psychiatry continues to foster that valid impression with its development of such brutal treatments as electroshock (ECT), psychosurgery, the chemical straitjacket caused by antipsychotic drugs, and its long record of treatment failures.

With the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), psychiatry has taken countless aspects of human behavior and reclassified them as a “mental illness” simply by adding the term “disorder” onto them. While even key DSM contributors admit that there is no scientific or medical validity to the “disorders,” the DSM nonetheless serves as a diagnostic tool, not only for individual treatment, but also for child custody disputes, discrimination cases, court testimony, education and more. As the diagnoses completely lack scientific criteria, anyone can be labeled mentally ill, and subjected to dangerous and life threatening “treatments” based solely on opinion.

The DSM is the key to false escalating mental illness statistics and psychiatric drug prescriptions and usage worldwide. Untold harm and colossal waste of mental health funds occur because of it. It is imperative that the DSM diagnostic system be abandoned before real mental health reform can occur.

2) Psychiatric treatments and research waste funds and other resources that should be used for legitimate scientific research.

For decades psychiatrists and psychologists have claimed a monopoly over the field of mental health. Governments and private health insurance companies have provided them with billions of dollars every year to research and treat “mental illness,” only to face industry demands for even more funds to improve the supposed, ever–worsening state of mental health. No other industry can afford to fail consistently and expect to get more funding.

Reports show that psychiatry has the worst fraud track record of all medical disciplines. An estimated $20-$40 billion is defrauded in the mental health industry in any given year.

With at least $76 billion spent every year on psychiatric drugs internationally, and billions more in psychiatric research, one would and should expect an improving condition. However, after decades of psychiatric monopoly over the world’s mental health, their approach leads only to upwardly spiraling mental illness statistics, massive increases in people taking mind?altering drugs, and escalating funding demands.

The claim that only increased funding will cure the problems of psychiatry has lost its ring of truth. Psychiatry and psychology should be held accountable for the funds already given them, and irrefutably and scientifically prove the physical existence of mental disorders they claim should be treated and covered by insurance, in the same way as physical diseases are.

Any form of psychiatric funding is actually unethical and harmful, since it precludes patients from finding out what is actually wrong and getting that effectively treated.

Psychiatric fraud and abuse must be eradicated so that SDG 9 can occur.
More funding.

The psychiatric Rush to Market

Psychiatry has always given the impression that cures were the rule, rather than the exception. However, the psychiatric industry itself admits it has no capacity to cure.

Psychotropic drugging is big business — a high-income partnership between psychiatry and drug companies that has created an $80 billion industry in psychotropic drugs.

Psychiatrists tell us that the way to fix unwanted behavior is by altering brain chemistry with a pill. But unlike a mainstream medical drug like insulin, psychotropic medications have no measurable target illness to correct, and can upset the very delicate balance of chemical processes the body needs to run smoothly. Nevertheless, psychiatrists and drug companies have used these drugs to create a huge and lucrative market niche. And they’ve done this by naming more and more unwanted behaviors as “medical disorders” requiring psychiatric medication.

Thus there is a continuing need to find or create new patients to which to market new drugs, and a continuing rush to market for the latest drugs regardless of their harmful side effects.

The Risk of Side Effects

In a study of 68,730 individuals it was found that psychotropic drugs (SSRIs, mood stabilizers, antipsychotics, and benzodiazepines) are independently associated with a significantly increased risk of hip fractures and other major osteoporotic fractures.

Lead author Dr. James Bolton at the University of Manitoba says, “So physicians need to think about fracture risk as they are prescribing these medications, especially in patients who are vulnerable to fracture.”

Psychiatric Marketing Campaigns

Almost a third of drugs cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration pose safety risks that are identified only after their approval. Thus we say “rush to market”; you can find hidden drug marketing campaigns practically everywhere.

Many of these marketing campaigns come from industry?funded front groups operated by psychiatrists but posing as compassionate patient support groups. Of all these programs, one of the most successful is the benevolent?sounding mental health screening campaign; it uses broad?based psychiatric screening questionnaires to diagnose common life situations such as sadness, nervousness and occasional loneliness.

Currently running is the “suicide prevention” campaign. But statistics show that there is no teenage suicide epidemic; and participants in these programs are more likely to consider suicide a solution to a problem after the screening program than before the program.

With a long and well-documented history of failure, psychiatrists and their drugs are under attack by government safety warnings, legislation, and tens of thousands of lawsuits.

Interestingly, underlying most psychiatric problems is an undiscovered and untreated physical illness. And when that is cured, so is the “mental problem.” But because of the powerful hold psychiatrists and drug companies exert over the rest of the medical field, this is rarely told to patients. To protect yourself and those you love, insist on a full and accurate consent: an accounting of all risks and benefits of the treatment recommended, of other treatments and of not doing anything at all.
Modern World

How psychiatry Perpetuates Gender Inequality

Reference:
United Nations Promoting Sustainable Development
Resolution adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on 25 September 2015
“Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

Sustainable: Of, relating to, or being a method or lifestyle for using resources so that the resources can be maintained and continued, and are not depleted or permanently damaged.

[from Old French sustenir (French: soutenir), from Latin sustineo, sustinere, from sub– (under) + teneo (hold, uphold, possess, guard, maintain)]

The U.N. Sustainable Development Goals

The 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) and their 169 associated targets adopted in 2015 and accepted by all Member States seek to realize the human rights of all and balance economic, social and environmental factors towards peace and prosperity for all.

To this end we examine some of the existing factors which block or inhibit the realization of these goals, and which must be eliminated so that the goals can be achieved in practice.

SDG 5: Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls.

Target 5.1: End all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere.

How Psychiatry Obstructs Target 5.1

According to the European Union Parliament “Report on improving the mental health of the population” (A6-0249/2006), “women … are prescribed twice as many psychotropic drugs as men … [and] pharmacokinetic studies have shown that women have less tolerance to such products”.

So, apparently psychiatrists know that women react more negatively to psychotropic drugs than men, but are given twice as many harmful and addictive psychotropic drugs as men.

Furthermore, the same report “Criticises the growing medicalisation of the processes and stages of development of women’s and girls’ bodies, as a result of which puberty, pregnancy or menopause are increasingly being defined as ‘illnesses’ or ‘disorders’ …”

Much of the expansion of psychiatry in the past few decades has been based on a fraudulent brain model that encourages psychiatric drug treatment as a panacea for multiple problems, many of which are actually real medical, social, ethical or spiritual conditions and not mental illnesses or brain abnormalities.

The general term “medicalization” (or the equivalent spelling “medicalisation”) means that non-medical problems, such as normal life events, become defined and treated as medical problems, usually as illnesses or disorders, so that they can be “treated” by psychiatrists with psychotropic drugs, instead of finding out their etiology and appropriately treating the real issues.

Here are some examples of medicalization:
— Various forms of addiction are medicalized so that they can be suppressed with psychotropic drugs, rather than handling the root physical, social and ethical aspects of the addiction.

— As referenced here, gender-related issues are being considered as mental illnesses and suppressed with psychotropic drugs instead of determining the actual medical, social, ethical, or spiritual underlying causes and addressing those.

Gender Discrimination in the DSM

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) labels some specific gender-related behaviors as mental illnesses. There are four entries in DSM-5 of “Gender dysphoria” [dysphoria: a state of unease or generalized dissatisfaction with life, from Greek dusphoros “hard to bear”]. There are four DSM entries specifically for female issues: “Premenstrual dysphoric disorder”, “Female orgasmic disorder”, “Female sexual interest/arousal disorder”, and “Genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorder”. Not to mention that the DSM considers that being a victim of sexual abuse is a mental disorder (“Personal history (past history) of sexual abuse”). And, as always, the catch-all category for everyone else, “Unspecified sexual dysfunction.”

Psychiatric fraud and abuse must be eradicated so that SDG 5 can occur.
Having an unpleasant feeling.

The Promise of Disordered Proteins

Various biotechnology companies are betting on the therapeutic potential of a certain class of proteins in researching possible new drugs.

Such proteins, called “intrinsically disordered proteins” (IDPs), look different from the proteins with rigid structures that are more familiar in cells. IDPs are shape-shifters, appearing as ensembles of components that constantly change configurations. This loose structure allows the IDPs to bring together a wide variety of molecules at critical moments, such as during a cell’s response to stress. Less flexible proteins tend to have a more limited number of binding partners. When IDPs do not function properly, disease can ensue. Medical researchers have  been trying to create treatments to eliminate or regulate malfunctioning IDPs.

In 2017 researchers demonstrated that an FDA-approved drug called trifluoperazine (which is prescribed for psychotic disorders and anxiety) bound to and inhibited NUPR1, a disordered protein involved in a form of pancreatic cancer.

The NUPR1 (nuclear protein 1) gene is an intrinsically disordered protein coding gene which is associated with pancreatic cancer, although the details of such functions are still unknown.

Trifluoperazine (brand name Novo-Trifluzine) is an older antipsychotic, also called a Major Tranquilizer or Neuroleptic. As with all such antipsychotics, possible side effects are: akathisia, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, tardive dyskinesia, anxiety, depression, mood changes, hostility, pancreatitis, seizures, suicidal thoughts, and violence.

The point we want to make is that researchers are actively investigating psychotropic drugs to see if they can be re-purposed for other uses than for which the FDA currently approves. If such drugs, or offshoots of such drugs, are given permission to be prescribed for additional uses, then more people could be exposed to the side effects of such drugs.

“TFP [trifluoperazine] cannot be used in clinic for treating patients with cancer, due to the numerous undesirable side effects that occur at efficient anticancer doses.” Since TFP shows such strong central nervous system side effects, researchers try to develop TFP derivatives with less side effects. Of course, human clinical trials must be done to show the results before marketing a drug, since the research up to this point has been done on mice.

But again, the points we want to make are that 1) the details of how these drugs are supposed to “work” are often unknown; 2) this type of research is highly speculative; and 3) the base drugs have toxic side effects.

All this reflects back to the original use of such psychotropic drugs and their horrific side effects. And the point we really want to make about this is that the root problem is not even the drugs. The real problem is that psychiatrists fraudulently diagnose life’s problems as an “illness”, and stigmatize unwanted behavior or study problems as  “diseases,” using the fraudulent Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders as justification to prescribe these drugs and other coercive and abusive “treatments.” Psychiatry’s stigmatizing labels, programs and treatments are harmful junk science; their diagnoses of “mental disorders” are a hoax – unscientific, fraudulent and harmful. All psychiatric treatments, not just psychiatric drugs, are dangerous.

Decades of psychiatric monopoly over mental health has only lead to upwardly spiraling mental illness statistics, continuously escalating funding demands, and ever more addictive and harmful drugs which can cause violence and suicide.

The many critical challenges facing societies today reflect the vital need to strengthen individuals through workable, viable and humanitarian alternatives to harmful psychiatric options. Contact your local, state and federal representatives and let them know what you think about this.

Click here for more information.

The Remedy of Tiredness

The fraudulent psychiatric billing bible, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), has quite a few entries related to one form or another of “sleep disorder,” many of which simply occur when a person is knocked out by some (legal or illegal) drug. And if a psychiatrist can’t find the real reason for a person’s troubled sleeping, they’ll just diagnose the catch-all “Unspecified sleep-wake disorder”. Psychiatrists assume that anything they can’t explain is a “mental illness.”

Of course, the psychiatric treatment of choice is a psychotropic drug, many of which have known side effects of difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep.

Lack of sufficient sleep, though, is only one cause of tiredness. There are quite a few medical and other reasons why someone might feel tired or exhausted, regardless of how much sleep they may or may not be getting. Clinical tests should be done by a competent, non-psychiatric health care professional, to determine if there are undiagnosed and untreated medical issues interfering with sleep. Oh, and the DSM also calls “sleep apnea” a psychiatric disorder, even though it may primarily be a medical or neurological issue.

Then there are a plethora of non-medical issues which might be causing tiredness. We’ll examine some, but not all of them, here.

We do not go deeply here into physical treatments; there are many good references on nutrition, exercise and body health which relate to the issues of sleep and tiredness.

What is Exhaustion?

Simple definition: Having wholly used up strength, patience, or resources; tired beyond endurance.

The surprising thing is that exhaustion can be a symptom of several things having nothing to do with extended effort. In fact, one thing that can cause exhaustion is inaction — the opposite of extended effort. Sitting around the house moping can make one just as tired as mountain climbing. It’s not real tiredness in this case; it’s psychosomatic.

Another thing tiredness can be traced to is some form of introversion or fixated attention. An example might be sitting in front of a computer or TV, eyes focused at a fixed distance for an extended period of time.

For these, the remedy is extroversion; go take a walk and look at the things around you.

Do You Feel Washed-Out?

Simple definition: Depleted in vigor or animation; faded.

When reading or studying, if you skip over words, symbols or abbreviations you don’t know and continue reading, you will start to feel washed-out. If you just now yawned, you are a good candidate for this remedy. The remedy is simple: go back, find the term you didn’t know, look it up in a dictionary, and use it in sentences until you understand it. Then re-read what you missed.

Have You Tried and Failed?

A blunted or abandoned purpose makes one feel tired or dopey. The remedy is to rekindle the failed purpose.

Are Your Efforts and Communications Cut or Incomplete?

Do you experience a lot of interruptions at work? Do people walk by, talk to you, and then walk away before you can respond?

When Cycles of Action or Cycles of Communication are cut or incomplete, you can experience tiredness that is otherwise unexplained. Again, the remedy is pretty simple: go back and complete the cycle of action or cycle of communication. Finish what was interrupted.

What Not To Do

These are not all the possible manifestations of tiredness, but these are fairly easy to recognize and have simple resolutions. The thing you must NOT do is think you have some “mental illness”, see a shrink, and take an antidepressant or other psychiatric drug which can be addictive and have horrific side effects. Take a nice long walk instead.

Never Out of SORTS

The Missouri attorney general’s office convinced a Jasper County jury that an 86-year-old former minister is still at risk of sodomizing teenage boys, even after he completed a 15-year prison sentence for doing so. He was sentenced to involuntary commitment in a secure state psychiatric facility essentially for the rest of his life.

The Sex Offender Rehabilitation and Treatment Services (SORTS) program in Missouri has been criticized since it started in 1999. It currently costs Missouri taxpayers $36.5 million per year to fund additional life sentences disguised as treatment for 257 patients after they have already completed their normal criminal prison terms.

Missouri Statutes 632.480 and 632.484 define a sexually violent predator as someone who suffers from a mental abnormality which makes the person more likely than not to engage in predatory acts of sexual violence if not confined in a secure facility — as determined by either a psychiatrist or psychologist.

The Pot Calling the Kettle Black

The fact is, when a psychiatrist or psychologist points the sexual predator finger at a person, they are likely doing so to remove suspicion from themselves or their profession. Research shows that between 10% and 25% of mental health practitioners sexually abuse their own patients. To cover up their crimes, psychiatrists have used drugs or electroshock in an effort to eliminate the patient’s memory of the rape, and use the involuntary commitment of others convicted of sexual predation to take the heat off themselves.

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) labels child sexual abuse as a mental disorder, when it is actually an ethical failure. With the DSM, psychiatry has taken countless aspects of human behavior and reclassified them as a “mental illness” simply by adding the term “disorder” onto them. While even key DSM contributors admit that there is no scientific or medical validity to the “disorders,” the DSM nonetheless serves as a diagnostic tool, not only for individual treatment, but also for child custody disputes, discrimination cases, court testimony, education and more. As the diagnoses completely lack scientific criteria, anyone can be labeled mentally ill, and subjected to dangerous and life threatening “treatments” and forced incarceration based solely on opinion.

Contact your Missouri State Senator and Representative and ask them to remove all references to the DSM from Missouri State Law.

In the case of SORTS, the person has paid their debt to society as determined by a criminal court, and further enforced incarceration by civil commitment is clearly a violation of Constitutional rights.

The fact that civil commitment is couched in such doublespeak as “for his own good,” or “to prevent him from committing harm,” is unfortunate, for it obfuscates the actual intention, which is to harm in the name of help.

With health care eating up vast amounts of our national budget, the first cut to make is the cost of “treating” people who have paid their societal debt and prefer not to be further mentally treated. Involuntary commitment laws hike federal, state, county, city and private health care costs under the strange circumstance of a patient-recipient who cannot say no.

The crime rate, including sexual violence, is on a long-term increase, and has reached epidemic proportions. The fact that most criminals pass through psychiatry’s portals before the crime speaks for itself. The number of mentally ill, per the statistics of psychiatric bodies themselves, continues to rise each year — which serves to point out the ironic existence of a profession which must constantly advertise its failures in order to gain greater government funding.

Psychiatrists’ own conduct, their interest in easy seizure of people, their inhuman acts and torture committed in the name of “treatment” and their fraudulent and failing “science,” is at complete variance to their public facade of “mental health.”

If a dangerous offense is committed by a person, then the fact remains criminal statutes exist to address this. As the late Dr. Thomas Szasz stated, “All criminal behavior should be controlled by means of the criminal law, from the administration of which psychiatrists ought to be excluded.”

Contact your Missouri State Senator and Representative and ask them to remove the SORTS program from Missouri law.

Nursing Homes Abusing Dementia Patients with Antipsychotics

A Human Rights Watch report found that many nursing homes are sedating their dementia residents by misusing antipsychotic drugs.

Former nursing home administrators admitted doling out drugs without having appropriate diagnoses, securing informed consent or divulging risks.

Having observed this personally for myself in a local St. Louis elder care facility, it is no surprise.

The report estimates that each week more than 179,000 elderly people living in U.S. nursing homes are fraudulently given antipsychotic drugs, without an approved psychiatric diagnosis, to suppress difficult behaviors and ease the load on overwhelmed staff.

This abusive practice benefits drugmakers to the tune of hundreds of millions of dollars, largely at the expense of the U.S. government.

Furthermore, the FDA has not deemed antipsychotic drugs an effective or safe way to treat symptoms associated with dementia. In fact, the FDA cautions that these drugs pose dangers for elderly patients with dementia, even doubling the risk of death.

Missouri’s antipsychotic use rate has remained around 18.5% or higher since 2016, and at 18.6 percent it’s now fifth worst in the nation.

Current research indicates that the fewer nurses available per patient, the more likely antipsychotics are to be improperly prescribed.

The shocking truth is that one in five seniors in the U.S. suffers from abusively prescribed psychoactive drugs. The psychiatric industry gets away with this abuse because they have fraudulently redefined old age as a “mental illness” in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) and the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11).

Examples of diagnoses that could be age-related

DSM-5: Phase of life problem, Problem related to living in a residential institution, Insufficient social insurance or welfare support, Alzheimer’s disease; and of course the catch-all Unspecified mental disorder

ICD-11: Various categories of Dementia; and in contrast to the DSM, the ICD just names it outright as Old age

A For-Profit Disease

To psychiatrists old age is a “mental disorder,” a for-profit disease for which they have no cure, but for which they will happily supply endless prescriptions of psychoactive drugs or electro-convulsive therapy. In most cases, the elderly are merely suffering from physical problems related to their age; for which psychiatry’s answer is to label them “depressed” or having “dementia.”

Through these fraudulent diagnoses, psychiatrists can involuntarily commit the elderly to a psychiatric facility, take control of their finances, override their wishes regarding their business, property or health care needs, and defraud their health insurance.

If an elderly person in your environment is displaying symptoms of mental trauma or unusual behavior, ensure that they get competent medical care from a non-psychiatric doctor. Insist upon a thorough physical examination to determine whether an underlying, undiagnosed physical problem is causing the condition.

For more information, download and read the CCHR bookletElderly Abuse – Cruel Mental Health Programs – Report and recommendations on psychiatry abusing seniors.

Pain is inevitable. Suffering is optional. [Buddhist proverb]

The subject of pain is often in the news. This week (23 August 2019) we notice the St. Louis Business Journal carrying an article about the National Institutes of Health giving a $2.1 million grant to a St. Louis University pain researcher “to help open up a new avenue for pain medication research.”

We have a suspicion that the whole subject of pain is not understood very well by many people, so we thought we’d discuss it here.

What is Pain?

The first order of business should be a useful definition of pain. As is usual with many English words, there are multiple definitions of the word. Pain is a perception available to living beings.

English definitions: punishment; an unpleasant bodily sensation; physical discomfort; mental or emotional distress or suffering; something troublesome; a result of loss; a result of causing bad acts.
[Middle English, from Anglo-French peine, from Latin poena, from Greek poin? “payment, penalty”]

Technical definitions: Pain is the randomity (misalignment) produced by sudden or strong counter-efforts (i.e. efforts opposing optimum survival); the ultimate penalty of destructive activity; the warning of loss; the threat of non-survival; the punishment for errors in trying to survive.

Memories of pain can be just as damaging as the actual pain itself. Unconsciousness to greater or lesser degree is a symptom of pain. Unfortunately for humans, any sensation is better than no sensation; so in the absence of any sensation one desires pain.

Pain can be synthesized as an electronic flow. Psychiatrists use the pain of electroshock and other harmful psychiatric treatments as a coercive control mechanism — a means of getting someone to behave as they have decided one should behave. A person can be so overwhelmed by pain that they become addicted to it.

Painkillers

Doctors prescribe pain killers to relieve pain. However, it has never been known exactly how or why these “work.” Research into pain killers generally occurs by accidental discoveries, and the results often have undesirable side effects. The actions of pain killers include impeding the electrical conductivity of nerve channels, rendering a person unfeeling. Pain drugs block wanted sensations as well as unwanted ones.

Psychiatric Drugs

Psychiatric drugs are prescribed for various types of physical pain and mental trauma. Read the manufacturer’s fine print for any psychiatric drug and it will say in so many words that “we don’t really know how this drug works,” and they all have bad side effects; although one could say that there are no “side effects” since these are the actual effects of the drugs, albeit unwanted. It could be dangerous to immediately cease taking psychiatric drugs because of potential significant withdrawal side effects. No one should abruptly stop taking any psychiatric drug without the advice and assistance of a competent medical doctor.

Because of the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), psychiatrists have deceived millions into thinking that the best answer to life’s many pains lies with the “latest and greatest” psychiatric drug. The DSM has led to the unnecessary drugging of millions of Americans who could be diagnosed, treated, and cured by non-psychiatric health care providers without the use of toxic and potentially lethal drugs.

Since psychiatric drugs do not actually cure conditions, but merely suppress symptoms, the patient may be lulled into a temporary sense of wellness; whatever condition has caused the symptom is still present and often growing worse.

A person in chronic physical pain may be misdiagnosed with a so-called mental disorder, labeled neurotic, and given a psychiatric drug which only makes the condition worse.

Authors Richard Hughes and Robert Brewin, in their book, The Tranquilizing of America, warned that although psychotropic drugs may appear “to ‘take the edge off’ anxiety, pain, and stress, they also take the edge off life itself … these pills not only numb the pain but numb the whole mind.”

Did we mention that the three Sackler brothers of Purdue Pharma, major enablers of the opioid addiction crisis, were all psychiatrists? A June 26, 2017 article on Kaiser Health News by Vickie Connor presents the information that, “Adults with a mental illness receive more than 50 percent of the 115 million opioid prescriptions in the United States annually.” We don’t really know which came first — the mental trauma or the physical pain; but it doesn’t really matter which comes first. The bottom line is that neither opioids nor psychiatric drugs are workable treatments.

What About the Suffering?

So how does one in pain overcome the suffering, as the ancient Buddhist proverb goes? Basically, understanding relieves suffering. We want you to understand that psychiatry kills. Find Out! Fight Back!

It’s All In Your Brain (Not!)

The Year of the Brain

President Obama announced The BRAIN Initiative (Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies) on April 2, 2013. The White House wanted to spend $100 million taxpayer dollars in 2014 on brain research.

We had little faith that $100 million would be used for developing anything but more abusive psychiatric drugs or more torturous devices such as Vagus Nerve Stimulation or Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation.

The problem is that the biological brain drug model based on bogus mental disorders in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) prevents governments from funding real medical solutions for people experiencing difficulty.

Despite the billions of government and pharmaceutical company funding in support of psychiatry’s brain chemical imbalance theory, this psychiatric “disease” model has been thoroughly debunked. The whole theory was invented to push drugs for profit.

The Brain of the Year

But it’s not just a matter of psychiatric drugs. The entire psychiatric and psychological industries are oriented on the brain. They have a number of names for it: neuropsychology, neuropsychiatry, neurocomputation, neurological psychology, neurological psychiatry — it all just means that psychiatry and psychology, in another attempt to make their pseudosciences seem more scientific, have joined up with the legitimate neuroscience field, in another attempt to blame it all on the brain. You might as well just blame it on the Bossa Nova.

One research paper claims that perception is often biased, selective, and malleable, and it all happens in the brain with neural activity.

Granted, the brain does play a role in perception. The brain might even be fooled by a trompe l’oeil, a visual illusion. But if you buy in to the cry that “it’s all brain” then you have abandoned your humanity, and your spirit, in favor of chemistry; you have bought into the reductio ad absurdum argument that there is no objective reality, it’s all in your brain.

Of course, once the psychopharmaceutical industry gives all its attention to the brain, then the brain is miraculously transformed into the seat of consciousness, and altering consciousness with drugs becomes commonplace. And we get the disastrous psychedelic psychiatric movement, where magic mushrooms will lead you to a better life.

Apparently enough time has passed that the public has forgotten what happened when psychedelics gained notoriety in the 1960s, when LSD pushed by psychiatrists spread into society as a recreational drug and started destroying lives with induced psychosis.

Brain Dead

Knowing nothing about the underlying causes of serious mental disturbance, psychiatry still sears the brain with electroshock, tears it with psychosurgery and deadens it with dangerous drugs.

Next time you are told that a psychiatric condition is due to a biochemical imbalance in the brain, ask if you can see the lab test results. There won’t be any.

The true resolution of many mental difficulties begins, not with a checklist of symptoms, but with ensuring that a competent, non-psychiatric health care professional completes a thorough physical examination.

If It’s Not The Brain, What Is It?

Rather than get all metaphysical, let’s just observe that for many questions, there is not just one answer. That’s a particularly relevant observation for psychiatric, brain and drug based research — the search for the One Thing that answers “Why did this happen?” This attitude only leads to a list of things, a list of symptoms, say, in the DSM.

Using the DSM, a psychiatrist need only label the patient with a single “mental disorder”, prescribe a drug and bill the patient’s insurance. The psychiatrist with the DSM in hand can try various diagnostic labels on the patient as if they were different sizes of apparel until he finds one that either fits the patient’s symptoms or comes close enough to allow him to bill the patient’s insurance. It’s the One Answer, you see, to all the patient’s problems. At least, it’s the only one needed to submit an insurance claim.

But the question, “Why is the patient behaving this way?” does not have just one answer; it can have many, many answers.

Let’s give an example, the classic Country Blues one.
Question: “Why do I feel so blue?”
Answer: My dog ran away. My wife left me. My husband left me. (We’re not sexist here.) My truck died. I’m broke. I’m broken hearted. I’ve been betrayed. No one really cares. No one ever listens to me. I did you wrong and now you’re gone.

You see, there’s more than one answer, and it isn’t “you’re depressed and need to take an antidepressant.”

It wasn’t the brain, you see. It was the dog, the wife, and the truck. It all piled on until the stress of it overwhelmed. You get the idea.

So what is the resolution of mental trauma? Well, each answer would have it’s own resolution. Get another dog, get another wife, get another truck, listen to others so they listen to you. Whatever it takes. You get the idea, again. An antidepressant makes the feeling go away, for a time (it makes ALL feelings go away, the good and the bad); but the dog is still gone, the wife is still gone, and the truck is still broken. And you can be sure your psychiatrist isn’t listening to you, except to hear for which DSM symptom he can prescribe a drug and bill your insurance.

So of course one’s perception can be biased, selective and malleable. It isn’t, however, the brain. It’s Life. Get Over It!