How psychiatry Perpetuates Hunger and Malnutrition

Reference:  United Nations Promoting Sustainable Development

Resolution adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on 25 September 2015

“Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development”

Sustainable: Of, relating to, or being a method or lifestyle for using resources so that the resources can be maintained and continued, and are not depleted or permanently damaged.

[from Old French sustenir (French: soutenir), from Latin sustineo, sustinere, from sub- (under) + teneo (hold, uphold, possess, guard, maintain)]

The U.N. Sustainable Development Goals

The 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) and their 169 associated targets adopted in 2015 and accepted by all Member States seek to realize the human rights of all and balance economic, social and environmental factors towards peace and prosperity for all.

To this end we examine some of the existing factors which block or inhibit the realization of these goals, and which must be eliminated so that the goals can be achieved in practice.

SDG 2: End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and
promote sustainable agriculture

Target 2.2: By 2030, end all forms of malnutrition, including achieving, by 2025, the internationally agreed targets on stunting and wasting in children under 5 years of age, and address the nutritional needs of adolescent girls, pregnant and lactating women and older persons.

How Psychiatry Obstructs Target 2.2

The possible side effects of common psychiatric drugs typically include adverse health and nutritional effects that would interfere with proper growth and digestion, particularly for children whose tolerance for adverse reactions may be lower than that of adults. There are approximately 8 million children in the U.S. who are regularly being given psychiatric drugs, and up to 20 million worldwide.

Here are some examples of such side effects.

Psychostimulants (such as ADHD drugs): anorexia, liver problems, loss of appetite, stomach pain, stunted growth, vomiting, weight loss.

Newer antidepressants (such as SSRIs): changes in ability to taste food, heartburn, loss of appetite, indigestion, nausea, problems with teeth, stomach pain, sudden upset stomach, vomiting, weight loss.

Older antidepressants: changes in appetite or weight, constipation, diarrhea, difficulty swallowing, gas, heartburn, jaw spasms, liver problems, nausea, stomach pain, vomiting, swelling of the throat or tongue, unusual taste in the mouth.

Antipsychotics (major tranquilizers or neuroleptics): birth defects, blood disorders, blood-sugar abnormalities, constipation, liver failure, diabetes, diarrhea, difficulty swallowing, excessive weight gain, heartburn, hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, indigestion, loss of appetite, nausea, pancreatitis, sore throat, vomiting.

Anti-anxiety drugs: susceptibility to infection, changes in appetite, constipation, diarrhea, seizures, heartburn, liver problems, nausea, stomach pain, swelling of the tongue or throat, upset stomach, vomiting, weight changes.

Barbiturates: kidney disease, liver disease, upset stomach.

Lithium: change in the ability to taste food, constipation, decreased appetite, diabetes, diarrhea, gas, indigestion, loss of appetite, nausea, seizures, stomach pain, swelling of the tongue or throat, thyroid problems, tongue pain, vomiting, weight gain or loss.

Of course, the real problem is that psychiatrists fraudulently diagnose life’s problems as an “illness”, and stigmatize unwanted behavior or study problems as “diseases.” Psychiatry’s stigmatizing labels, programs and treatments are harmful junk science; their diagnoses of “mental disorders” are a hoax — unscientific, fraudulent and harmful. All psychiatric treatments, not just psychiatric drugs, are dangerous.

Psychiatry must be eradicated so that SDG 2 can occur.

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