You’re Not Paranoid, It’s Really Happening

Abilify Mycite® (aripiprazole tablets with sensor, from Otsuka Pharmaceutical) is a prescription drug of an aripiprazole tablet (an atypical antipsychotic) with a metallic Ingestible Event Marker (IEM) sensor inside it, used in adults for diagnoses of schizophrenia, bipolar I disorder, and major depressive disorder. A month’s supply of it costs around $1,650. The actual mechanism of action of aripiprazole is unknown, although it messes with the levels of dopamine and serotonin in the brain, which is playing Russian Roulette with your mind.

The sensor is intended to track, with a smartphone app, if the drug has been taken. The ability of this drug to improve patient compliance or modify dosage has not been established. The only thing the FDA approved was functions related to tracking drug ingestion. The use of this drug to track drug ingestion in real-time or during an emergency is not recommended because detection may be delayed or not occur.

The drug sends information to a patch worn on the patient’s arm, which is then logged on a mobile app, which then sends the data to their doctor. Some experts warn that the idea of swallowing a tracking chip may be too much for paranoid patients to handle.

Said one expert, “I am concerned about the formation of new pharmaceutical persons who are digitally enhanced to be compliant with the profit motives of corporations and the directives of health providers and drug companies. … The fact that the drug is Abilify, which is prescribed to people who experience serious mental distress, should raise many ethical red flags. These concerns are especially relevant because the patent for the original Abilify drug expired in 2016… My concern is that … the company will be motivated to profit from the technology as much as possible, regardless of whether the drug actually improves health.”

The idea for this gross invasion of privacy comes about because refusing to take prescribed drugs is a particular psychiatric concern, and is even enshrined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V) as “Nonadherence to medical treatment.”

Abilify MyCite is still not widely used in the US, possibly because of skepticism from patients, prescribing doctors and insurance providers, although Otsuka has collaborated with Magellan Health to roll the drug out to the US, and UnitedHealthcare has developed complex rules for insurance authorization.

This drug has potentially severe side effects including stroke; akathisia; neuroleptic malignant syndrome; tardive dyskinesia; unusual urges such as compulsive gambling, sex, eating, or shopping; seizures; suicidal thoughts or behaviors. Side effects may be considerably more severe with known CYP2D6 poor metabolizers (a Cytochrome P450 enzyme.)

This drug also has a Boxed Warning about an increased risk of suicidal thinking and behavior in children, adolescents and young adults.

Recognize that the real problem is that psychiatrists fraudulently diagnose life’s problems as an “illness”, and stigmatize unwanted behavior as “diseases.” Psychiatry’s stigmatizing labels, programs and treatments are harmful junk science; their diagnoses of “mental disorders” are a hoax — unscientific, fraudulent and harmful.

If you are taking this drug, do not stop suddenly. You could suffer serious withdrawal symptoms. You should seek the advice and help of a competent medical doctor or practitioner before trying to come off any psychiatric drug.

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