Pay to Play Psychiatry

The second-highest-paying job in the St. Louis area, with an annual mean salary of $236,630, is “psychiatrist.”

The data was released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics in summer 2017, and covers annual mean wages as of May 2016. It is the latest wage data available for the St. Louis metro area.

Nationally, “psychiatrist” is the eighth highest-paying job, at $194,740 median pay per year.

Considering that psychiatry by its own admission can produce no cures, and in fact harms more than it helps, one marvels that it is such a high-paying occupation. How could this be?

The coercive nature of psychiatric “treatments” is one answer. Fraudulently hospitalized citizens have been held until their mental health insurance benefits ran out. The psychiatric “diagnosis” was often changed to exhaust the insurance coverage. Mental health hospitals must be established to replace coercive psychiatric institutions.

Despite years of healthcare fraud investigations and convictions, psychiatrists and psychologists have not reformed the fraudulent practices that are rife within their ranks. Internationally, fraud in the mental health industry has been estimated to cost more than a hundred billion dollars every year.

Proper medical screening by non-psychiatric diagnostic specialists could eliminate more than 40% of psychiatric admissions. Medical studies have shown time and again that for many patients, what appear to be mental problems are actually caused by an undiagnosed and untreated physical illness or condition.

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is the key to escalating “mental illness” statistics and psychotropic drug usage. Untold harm and colossal waste of mental health care funds occur because of it. The unscientific and spurious nature of the DSM invites fraud. The DSM diagnostic system must be abandoned before real mental health reform can occur.

Ultimately, psychiatrists, psychologists, psychotherapists and their hospitals must be made fully accountable for their funding, practices and treatments, and their results, or lack thereof. Pay a psychiatrist only for proven, workable treatments that verifiably and dramatically improve or cure mental health problems.

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