Archive for November, 2016

Election Anxiety

Saturday, November 26th, 2016

anxiety: A sense of apprehension, uneasiness, or fear often over an impending or anticipated ill — from Latin anxius “troubled, uneasy”.

The mental health (aka psychiatric) community is all over this, warning Americans about election stress deteriorating into depression and salivating over the number of anti-depressant prescriptions they can write.

Many people are not only convinced that the environment is dangerous, but that it is steadily growing more so. For many, it’s more of a challenge than they feel up to. An “environmental challenge” exists in an area filled with irrationality. While we thrive on a challenge, we can also be overwhelmed by a challenge to which we cannot respond.

A wide variety of environmental stresses can contribute to the onset of anxiety. Find something in your environment that isn’t being a threat. It will calm you down.

The answer to this anxiety and stress is, of course, direct action. Take some positive action over which you have some small measure of control — write a letter to the editor; write a letter to your local, state and federal representatives; contribute time or money to a worthwhile cause; take some self-improvement course.

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), the billing bible of the mental health care industry, names stress explicitly as a billable diagnosis: Trauma- and Stressor-Related Disorders (an entire chapter in DSM-5); including various manifestations of PTSD, acute stress disorder, adjustment disorders, and reactive attachment disorder.

Their answer, however, is not action — it is drugs. They even have a class of drugs specifically marketed for this, called anti-anxiety drugs. These drugs come with side effect; one of the side effects is more anxiety. Other side effects can be hallucinations, delusions, confusion, aggression, violence, hostility, agitation, irritability, depression, and suicidal thinking. These are also some of the most difficult drugs to withdraw from.

We would like to make it very clear that ANXIETY and STRESS ARE NOT A MENTAL ILLNESS! They are the reaction to a stressor, something over which you have no control. The answer is to find something over which you do have some measure of control, and take action on it.

One of the more common American causes of anxiety is hypoglycemia. Yes, mental anxiety is one of the symptoms of low blood sugar, which is usually caused by consuming too much sugar.

So, if you are feeling down about the election, forego that self-indulgent donut and write your congressman instead!votazac

Trintellix by any other name

Thursday, November 24th, 2016

This year (in May, 2016) the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in cooperation with drug distributor Takeda Pharmaceuticals has changed the brand name of the antidepressant Brintellix to Trintellix. The generic name vortioxetine remains the same. The name change was made because of continued prescribing and dispensing errors with a completely different blood-thinning drug called Brilinta.

Of course, we don’t recommend taking the drug regardless of what it is called. It supposed to be prescribed for something called “major depressive disorder [MDD].” In practice, it is just another SSRI, messing with the levels of serotonin in the brain. To quote from the manufacturer’s Medication Guide, “The mechanism of the antidepressant effect of vortioxetine is not fully understood.”

Interestingly enough, one of the potential side effects is actually called “Serotonin Syndrome,” whose symptoms may include agitation, hallucinations, delirium, coma, tachycardia, labile blood pressure, dizziness, diaphoresis, flushing, hyperthermia, tremor, rigidity, myoclonus, hyperreflexia, incoordination, seizures, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.

“Pooled analyses of shortterm placebo-controlled studies of antidepressant drugs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors
[SSRIs] and others) showed that these drugs increase the risk of suicidal thinking and behavior (suicidality) in children, adolescents, and young adults (ages 18 to 24) with MDD and other psychiatric disorders.”

See our previous blog on Brintellix for more information.
See this also for more information.

We must recognize that the real problem is that psychiatrists and other medical practitioners fraudulently diagnose life’s problems as an “illness” and stigmatize unwanted behavior as  “diseases.” Psychiatry’s stigmatizing labels, programs and treatments are harmful junk science; their diagnoses of “mental disorders” are a hoax – unscientific, fraudulent and harmful.

CCHR believes that everyone has the right to full informed consent. FIND OUT! FIGHT BACK!